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holdingontohope

Using Automated Needling Device as a Stamp

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I have had needling done before and I am thinking of doing it myself this time. I've had it done with a roller and pen. I've heard with the roller skin can tear and the angle isn't good. When I had the pen done, he moved it around like crazy (as you see on youtube). I felt sometimes it would get stuck to my skin as he would move it around.

So I was thinking of getting a stamp,but then I came across a guy on Youtube who was essentially using a pen and stamping it on his skin instead of doing crazy circular motions. 

I was trying to do more research on the pen, can someone tell me what this means? http://www.fda.gov/ICECI/EnforcementActions/WarningLetters/ucm429899.htm

I know the dermapen is probably expensive but willing to do whatever it takes at this point. 

 

Edited by holdingontohope
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I think the roller part only applies to longer needles, you don't specify the length you intend to use...

Anyway, from reading mostly everywhere it should be the same for both pens and stamps so I think you'll be fine just using the pen... Besides it should be easier to penetrate evenly with the pen.

Cheers m8!

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I'm not sure what you mean as isn't the Dermapen a stamp itself?... just an automated one. You wouldn't need to use a stamping motion with the pen as it does it by itself - unless what you mean is whole it steady in one place. In that case, you only really want to make singular impressions in different locations rather than hitting the same holes repeatedly. This is why if using a roller, you should lift after going it one direction so that you don't end up going over the same "train tracks" when you go back the other way. The objective is to create as many different holes as close together as possible.

I can only speak from experience of using a Derminator as opposed to a Dermapen, although it is essentially the same thing. You need to move it around in circular motions in order to keep hitting different areas of the skin otherwise you would just keep repeatedly hitting the same bit over and over. The needles go in and out so fast that you don't tear the skin sideways if that's what you're concerned about. 

Re: using a dermaroller, people have had success with it in the past but a stamping action is considered the better option these days as it is simply makes vertical penetrations into the skin. If you think about it, the needles rotating on a roller will enter the skin at one angle and leave at another, making triangular traumas into the skin. 

PS. Perhaps if you can post the YouTube videos you mention we might be able to understand what you mean better.

Edited by Paul B
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Don't know what anyone else thinks but personally I do not get it. I don't know what he thinks he is achieving by using a stamping motion when it's already operating as a stamp. Seems that he thinks he'll go deeper by doing that but the reality is you can achieve maximum depth just by holding the device against your skin or applying a bit more pressure. You'd be better off using an actual dermastamp if you wanted to do that sort of thing otherwise you are relying on the needles being in the outermost position the exact moment you thrust the Dermapen against your skin if you see what I'm saying... it's constantly going in and out - whereas a stamp has a constant needle length.

Edited by Paul B
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7 hours ago, Viseslav Tonkovic-Capin said:

No circular motions should be used with micro-needle stamping devices since you may do micro-tears of the skin, i.e. cause unnecessary damage to the skin. 
Best!

Ha. Well, this is about as clear as mud - and I think one of the problems is we are talking at cross-purposes here...

In summary:

Dermarollers/dermastamps - makes sense not to move vertically/horizontally/in circles as you would just be tearing the skin (if you don't lift)
Derminator - This product's very instructions state that you do should use circular motions
Dermapen - Looks to me like the guidelines are that you glide over the skin in straight lines, though it says you can use circles in the nose, eyes and chin - but why should that be any different to anywhere else?

On the subject of micro-tearing, I believe there is supposed to be a lower risk of that using the Derminator than anything else. Whether the technique used for the Dermapen or Derminator should differ from one another is seemingly up in the air. Edited by Paul B
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So I am thinking of purchasing a dermapen. I just checked, they don't sell them in the US, but it seems they are $2700 and then they sell cartridge heads that are disposable for like $750 a box. Anyone know why so much? 

At this point, I don't even care. I'll spend my last penny if it means I actually have a life. 

Edited by holdingontohope
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Sounds like a huge waste of money, I would look into alternatives like the derminator. Or just keep it simple and get a dermastamp, then you save all that money and avoid the chances of skin tearing you are trying to avoid.

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On June 3, 2016 at 2:47 AM, holdingontohope said:

All the videos I have seen of the dermapen have used circular motions. When I had the dermapen done to me, the doc used circular motions as well and I felt many times the needles get stuck to my skin.


Yeah I'm confused about that too, why do they use circular and gliding motions and not a stamping motion? Do you have to be a professional in the medical field to purchase a dermapen or anyone can?
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8 hours ago, Angelinna said:

Yeah I'm confused about that too, why do they use circular and gliding motions and not a stamping motion? Do you have to be a professional in the medical field to purchase a dermapen or anyone can?

No idea why they do circular motions because it got stuck on my skin many times and either jammed it or something. He had to take it off and restart 

They don't sell it in the US (something to do with FDA but if I do go this route, I will have someone out of the US purchase it for me. I'm pretty sure anyone can get it. Not sure how the doctors are using the device if it's not approved for the US. 

Im wondering how much the guy in the YouTube video got his for. I will message him. Probably sponsored. 

I could just buy the stamp and stamp myself but I'm hesitant. Would rather have something mechanically do it and with the same effect each time. 

I guess though I should get some stamps first and see if I'm able to do it correctly.

The other thing I have thought of is should I get my health in order before I start stamping? Meaning I feel like I have thyroid problems that result in poor wound healing. 
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Ok so before jumping into something that expensive, I want to try something automated and in a stamping motion, instead of circular. 

Besides the dermapen, anything else out there? 

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