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Tyler R

Acne and your career?

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I have extremely oily skin, rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, and acne.  My skin is flaky, oily, red and bumpy.  I have relatively mild-light acne, but it never goes away.  I could deal with all the other things, but acne looks childish and ugly.  I've seen plenty of people with red skin and they look fine.

How does acne affect your career?

I plan on entering a program next year where I have to teach one college class a semester and in return my Master's degree gets paid for.  I'm deathly afraid, but I can't pass up the opportunity.  I already look young for being 25, and I just don't know how I'm going to get up in front of a class everyday with pimples.  

I mainly have closed comedones that get inflamed.  They always come back.  I'm considering wearing makeup.  It's that bad.

Any tips for handling situations like this?

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I'm a classroom teacher of 11 years and i work with elementary school age Pre-K - 5th grade.  They don't get more honest than that.  I say go for it.  You cant control what your students say about you and your pay check is not contingent on it so do your best to ignore it.  If wearing makeup helps....do it.  I have struggled with acne since i started teaching and haven't quit yet.

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1 hour ago, leelowe1 said:

I'm a classroom teacher of 11 years and i work with elementary school age Pre-K - 5th grade.  They don't get more honest than that.  I say go for it.  You cant control what your students say about you and your pay check is not contingent on it so do your best to ignore it.  If wearing makeup helps....do it.  I have struggled with acne since i started teaching and haven't quit yet.

Thanks for the encouragement.  I forgot to mention I will be teaching college...as an adjunct.  Sometimes I just hate leaving the house, or talking to anyone in person.  It's hard for me to fathom speaking in front of a whole class on days when I'm feeling particularly down because of my skin.  Gaining my peers respect is of utmost importance due to my young age and partial qualifications.  I don't know if it's just me, but I think people have a certain disdain for people with skin conditions.

Also, as a man, I've found making makeup look natural is harder than it seems.  My oily, flaky skin doesn't seem to like it very much, though it would be nice to have some help on days. Edited by Tyler R
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We are in nearly identical situations based on your symptoms and circumstances. I suffer from the extremely oily skin, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis. I also have dealt with bouts of hives and persistent fordyce spots on lips. I do feel like some people carry disdain, but I'm at a point where opinions of others matter less to me. "Other people's opinions don't have to become your reality," is a quote a recite to myself from time to time. 

As far as classroom goes consider these points:
1- Between tablets, phones, and laptops,  student's attention is diverted to a plethora things other than instructor. At times, you could put on a pink afro wig and half class would't notice until its time to leave
2- Powerpoint/Prezi lectures allow to dim lights which feels a little more comfortable on bad days
3- Flip the script -give students opportunity to present lecture material or share presentations. This alone will have some students petrified as spotlight shifts directly to them. It is also a necessary evil for their development.
4- Keep lectures interesting, possibly interactive? For ex. in class group assignments, videos, etc...
5- Finally, you are the person in charge. They will show you respect as long  as you carry yourself in manner which commands it, regardless of skin problems. 

Hope this is helpful!

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17 hours ago, SWILL061 said:

We are in nearly identical situations based on your symptoms and circumstances. I suffer from the extremely oily skin, rosacea, and seborrheic dermatitis. I also have dealt with bouts of hives and persistent fordyce spots on lips. I do feel like some people carry disdain, but I'm at a point where opinions of others matter less to me. "Other people's opinions don't have to become your reality," is a quote a recite to myself from time to time. 

As far as classroom goes consider these points:
1- Between tablets, phones, and laptops,  student's attention is diverted to a plethora things other than instructor. At times, you could put on a pink afro wig and half class would't notice until its time to leave
2- Powerpoint/Prezi lectures allow to dim lights which feels a little more comfortable on bad days
3- Flip the script -give students opportunity to present lecture material or share presentations. This alone will have some students petrified as spotlight shifts directly to them. It is also a necessary evil for their development.
4- Keep lectures interesting, possibly interactive? For ex. in class group assignments, videos, etc...
5- Finally, you are the person in charge. They will show you respect as long  as you carry yourself in manner which commands it, regardless of skin problems. 

Hope this is helpful!


 

This is very helpful SWILL, thanks!

How do you cope with it though, physically?

Right now, my face is covered in oily after an hour and 15 minute class session.  I usually blot right after class or sometimes go to the bathroom and do it in class.  

As for rosacea, I tend to be a flusher in certain situations where I am nervous, but for the most part this is in WARM rooms.  The problem is I have no control over the rooms temperature.  I've been in some rooms so far this semester where I know I would flush violently if I had to speak in the spotlight.  In cool, air conditioned rooms, I find I have no trouble speaking.  It's funny, because I was by far the funniest, and one of the most confident speakers in my public speaking class in the summer when the rooms were air conditioned...sigh.  I can't even answer a simple question without burning when the room is warm/hot.

Any flushing issues?
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Tyler-
Again, our experiences are ridiculously similar. I have had significant flushing issues which for me have been caused by nerves, temperature, and diet. Warm rooms can be a nightmare for me too. I live in Louisiana, so no real escape from excess warmth and humidity most of the year. I always try to keep cool drinks with me. However, what helps me most are ice packs like back pads.

The ice packs help reduce my flushing by I'd say 75%. In other words flushing is a non-issue in certain situations. I've worn them off and on for years and certain types aren't easily noticed. Know it may sound crazy, but it works for me. I don't like mental toll our skin problems create, so I get creative to minimize their presence and live my life comfortably. 

I do have a few skin care regimens which vary depending on exact issue and severity. My worst breakouts cause heavy flaking around nose, chin, eyebrows, and ears along with heavy redness, and hives. My primary solution is ACV and jojoba based. 24-48 hrs I'm good to go. We should definitely talk more. 


 

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I work in a different field, but know exactly how you feel.  Today I was in a big meeting and looking around I was the only person in the room with acne.  It's such a hard pill to swallow.  I'm 32 and am more uncomfortable in my skin than ever before.  Hang in there.  At least we are not alone.

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On 3/9/2016 at 2:51 PM, SWILL061 said:

Tyler-
Again, our experiences are ridiculously similar. I have had significant flushing issues which for me have been caused by nerves, temperature, and diet. Warm rooms can be a nightmare for me too. I live in Louisiana, so no real escape from excess warmth and humidity most of the year. I always try to keep cool drinks with me. However, what helps me most are ice packs like back pads.

The ice packs help reduce my flushing by I'd say 75%. In other words flushing is a non-issue in certain situations. I've worn them off and on for years and certain types aren't easily noticed. Know it may sound crazy, but it works for me. I don't like mental toll our skin problems create, so I get creative to minimize their presence and live my life comfortably. 

I do have a few skin care regimens which vary depending on exact issue and severity. My worst breakouts cause heavy flaking around nose, chin, eyebrows, and ears along with heavy redness, and hives. My primary solution is ACV and jojoba based. 24-48 hrs I'm good to go. We should definitely talk more. 


 

SWILL, the ice pack method is genius!  From what I take it, you strap an ice pack to your back to keep your body temperature from raising?  Or do you buy one already constructed for that purpose?  Only problem I could potentially see with this is if the ice pack starts to melt and seeps through your shirt leaving you with a soaked back.  

And you find that ACV helps with the flakes?  I know ACV is supposed to be good for flakiness, but I've never really found it to eradicate much.  Still, I know it's good for skin ph and overall texture.  I actually was planning to add this into my daytime regimen but was afraid of the smell.  I thought I was the only person out there with this multitude of skin problems.  Almost every time I look in the mirror I see new flakes to pick off.  I carry tweezers around in my back pocket to use throughout the day.  It's embarrassing to say the least.

Do you blot your face often during the day?  Another thing I'm worried about--I know I worry too much--is situations other teachers have been in where they are around students for long hours and don't get a chance to go to the bathroom or anything to blot.  Do you find time to do this before your face becomes an oily mess?

20 hours ago, ABF32 said:

I work in a different field, but know exactly how you feel.  Today I was in a big meeting and looking around I was the only person in the room with acne.  It's such a hard pill to swallow.  I'm 32 and am more uncomfortable in my skin than ever before.  Hang in there.  At least we are not alone.

It's very discouraging.  I want to try and wear makeup for days like those^ but I can't bring myself to do it.  It's crazy how everyone who had it in high school--who made you feel comfortable to be around because they had it to--has grown out of it.  Then there are people like us who just can't get past it.  I just don't get it.
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Any advice on flushing?
I do it when i get nervous- and i get nervous whenever i talk with sb cause i know my face will flush - god hate it, possible to cut some nerves or? 
I dont flush when i have foundation cause i know that if i flush - nb will see.  :but i have acne and clogged pores all over my face so i cannot wear foundation... uhhh i try aways myself to stay calm and dont flush but my face get burning hot despite that...

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1. you need to see a dermatologist to find any medical cause for your flushing, if none then,

 2. some people use Afrin spray (nasal decongestant) smeared onto skin 3x/wk to shrink skin blood vessels and therefore reduce redness

3. other people decide on intense-pulsed light  (IPL) treatment by a dermatologist to reduce the number of capillaries in the skin

Also pay attention if some foods and drinks or even medications (usually those for blood pressure) make your flushing worse.

Best!

Vise

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What icepacks do you use, if you dont mind me asking? I'd be really interested in getting some.

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Hi Tyler!
Im a 32 year old female who has had acne for 20 years. Its been back and forth between mild and cystc but it absolutely held me back in my career and i regret that. I have anxiety and i recently lost a job due to missing work. I suggest not allowing it to control your life. I'm on anxiety meds and it helps a lot.
I dont have an answer but sea buckthorn oil is great topically for me. Some people take coconut oil internally for those conditions.Since youre male and makeup is difficult I'd suggest applying Milk of Magnesia with a cotton ball its invisible and helps with shine. Its never made my skin worse. I'm using evening primrose oil but idk if its OK for males. There are meds like oracea and laser for flushing if you are interested, ask your derm. My advice is try not to dwell on your skin. Treat it as need be and DONT let it define you.People will respect and like you no matter what your face is going through. I truly sympathise.

Edited by snarkygirl
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On 4/15/2016 at 8:54 PM, holdingontohope said:

I didn't really read the thread but have you changed your diet? Sugar and milk? 

Anyways, yes, wear the makeup! Do what you have to do for today.

I have changed my diet.  It's not perfect, but it's a lot ''healthier than most people's my age with clear skin.  For example, if I eat an egg sandwich, I make it using Ezekiel bread.  I opt for the healthier alternative.  No milk (a little cheese, though), no high glycemic carbs, no artifical sugar or processed foods.  I do still eat carbs like rice and rice cakes.  I eat peanut butter a lot, and use fattening salad dressings (ranch).  So, for the most part I eat healthy.  Kind of like a modified Paleo.

I've realized that my skin is way to oily/flaky to use makeup.  It will just cake up and smear off.

I'm thinking it might be candida issues as I ate like complete shit during and after my years of  teenage acne, antibiotic treatments.  
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Thought I'd add my voice to this thread...

I'm a 33 year old male from the UK and like many others on here have suffered with acne since early teens.

I work as an Emergency Medicine doctor, and I can honestly say acne is the only thing that affects my confidence. I've been told I'm a reasonably attractive guy, I train regularly and stay in shape so it is frustrating when you have acne in your 30s and often feel helpless in not being able to do anything about it. I dont and never have received any comments about my acne at work like some of you guys from the kids, which I can imagine is much worse and humiliating, but it does cross my mind at times how much confidence patients would have in  a physician who cant even control his own acne. If I'm perfectly honest, since i work in A&E, I doubt it even crosses their minds (unlike for example had I worked in dermatology) but it honestly is a day to day frustration and a regular blow to my self confidence.

I think it doubly hurts at my age now as, previously it was only about how I looked, but something I shared with other teenagers, young people in their 20s, now I look around and everyone's skin is clear. Even if they had acne, years of not having it would have cleared the scars. 

Having said all that, in recent months the acne has reduced considerably since the consistent use of oxytetracycline.

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On 5/2/2016 at 9:07 PM, Achilles82 said:

Thought I'd add my voice to this thread...

I'm a 33 year old male from the UK and like many others on here have suffered with acne since early teens.

I work as an Emergency Medicine doctor, and I can honestly say acne is the only thing that affects my confidence. I've been told I'm a reasonably attractive guy, I train regularly and stay in shape so it is frustrating when you have acne in your 30s and often feel helpless in not being able to do anything about it. I dont and never have received any comments about my acne at work like some of you guys from the kids, which I can imagine is much worse and humiliating, but it does cross my mind at times how much confidence patients would have in  a physician who cant even control his own acne. If I'm perfectly honest, since i work in A&E, I doubt it even crosses their minds (unlike for example had I worked in dermatology) but it honestly is a day to day frustration and a regular blow to my self confidence.

I think it doubly hurts at my age now as, previously it was only about how I looked, but something I shared with other teenagers, young people in their 20s, now I look around and everyone's skin is clear. Even if they had acne, years of not having it would have cleared the scars. 

Having said all that, in recent months the acne has reduced considerably since the consistent use of oxytetracycline.

i hear you, its embarrassing I get you (to be a doctor and can't control your own acne). I used to do make up and hair for a living...same issue.
I'm sure you know this but, antibiotics can possibly make the problem worse in the long run. But it does work short term so its tempting. Acne sducks.
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On 5/2/2016 at 9:07 PM, Achilles82 said:

Thought I'd add my voice to this thread...

I'm a 33 year old male from the UK and like many others on here have suffered with acne since early teens.

I work as an Emergency Medicine doctor, and I can honestly say acne is the only thing that affects my confidence. I've been told I'm a reasonably attractive guy, I train regularly and stay in shape so it is frustrating when you have acne in your 30s and often feel helpless in not being able to do anything about it. I dont and never have received any comments about my acne at work like some of you guys from the kids, which I can imagine is much worse and humiliating, but it does cross my mind at times how much confidence patients would have in  a physician who cant even control his own acne. If I'm perfectly honest, since i work in A&E, I doubt it even crosses their minds (unlike for example had I worked in dermatology) but it honestly is a day to day frustration and a regular blow to my self confidence.

I think it doubly hurts at my age now as, previously it was only about how I looked, but something I shared with other teenagers, young people in their 20s, now I look around and everyone's skin is clear. Even if they had acne, years of not having it would have cleared the scars. 

Having said all that, in recent months the acne has reduced considerably since the consistent use of oxytetracycline.

I have had some similar experiences.  My acne isn't bad enough to warrant any concern through comments and questions.  Nobody ever remarks on it, but it is my number one insecurity, and the only thing that affects my confidence as well.  When I've told a select few people about my issue they were in disbelief, and said things like, 'so what? you're goodlooking'.  They just didn't understand.  In a couple of months I'm going to be in front of a classroom three times a week.  I don't know how I'm going to do it.  I'm worried about how much respect students only a few years younger than me will have for someone who has bad skin and flushing episodes.  Kind of a similar situation with patients.

What kind of acne do you have?  I have closed comedones/clogged pores that turn into whiteheads, and oily, flaky, red skin.  I rarely get the inflammatory overnight bump.  Sometimes I get hairs growing out of them in my mustache and beard. Edited by Tyler R
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