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acnesince13

Regeneration

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For the most part, this is speculative, but did you know animals with it do not form scars, and the skin/tissue grows back just as it used to. I would love to have this. Perhaps it can be done one day for humans.

But for those of us who already have scars, it won't work, I don't believe. Somehow the body puts the tissue back the way it should be when you are injured, regrows the dermis, not sure how it does this.

Edited by acnesince13

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whenever a injury occurs the body attempts to heal the site of injury as fast as possible, what it does in the end result is create scar tissue. your body sees scar tissue as "healed" so it does not even bother with it.

animals do scar as well, im not sure what would you give the idea that they dont.

Science is getting close at getting rid of scars through stem cell research, stem cells are proving there selfs worthy at getting rid of destroyed nervous tissue(paralysis) and replacing it with healthy nerve cells, and returning it to normal.

Stem Cells do the same thing and dont see scar tissue as "healed" they see it as damaged and want to repair it.

Stem Cells for acne scars is finally seeing a small breakthrough in being mainstream, but the only reason it took so long is because of damn politics.

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It's a bit different for acne scars. Most acne scars occurred because of a LACK of healing, specifically in that collagen didn't form quickly enough.

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It's a bit different for acne scars. Most acne scars occurred because of a LACK of healing, specifically in that collagen didn't form quickly enough.

not necessarily, most superficial damage does not create scars, but whenever acne damages the dermis layer of the skin is a differnt story. With a damaged dermis layer it results in damaging the basal layer (very bottom of the epidermis), the basal layer is where all your (skin) stem cells and what not exist. so without this layer and stem cells, your body can not really grow skin ontop of the damaged area. Afterall stem cells can turn into whatever they want to give your skin that natural appearance to it.

This is why I cant wait for the SCAAR Fx to come out, it sounds very promising. Since it goes through the entire dermis layer perhaps it will force your skin to make a new dermis layer, whcih in turn will create a new basal layer.

The basal layer will produce stem cells to help restore your skin.

Thats what im hoping but maby thats just wishful thinking :)

Edited by LZOMG

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It's not going to do anything. These mechanical treatments don't target the source of the problem, they just further mess with your skin in the hope that it will randomly give you something that looks more acceptable, but inside it just fucks your shit up further.

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It's not going to do anything. These mechanical treatments don't target the source of the problem, they just further mess with your skin in the hope that it will randomly give you something that looks more acceptable, but inside it just fucks your shit up further.

The SCAAR FX? how can you make such claims when their are really no details on how effective this is.

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animals do scar as well, im not sure what would you give the idea that they dont.

I'm confused here, you did read what I wrote, correct? Yes, animals that don't have regeneration do scar. But say a laceration into the dermis of a newt would not heal the same way a human's wound would. It would put it back exactly as it was before. It can regenerate lost limbs, and other parts, though not all.

More specifically

http://www.viewzone2.com/regen.html

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animals do scar as well, im not sure what would you give the idea that they dont.

I'm confused here, you did read what I wrote, correct? Yes, animals that don't have regeneration do scar. But say a laceration into the dermis of a newt would not heal the same way a human's wound would. It would put it back exactly as it was before. It can regenerate lost limbs, and other parts, though not all.

More specifically

http://www.viewzone2.com/regen.html

Animals do scar (im sure you have seen atleast one dog with a scar on its face), but I didnt know yuo were specifically talking about regeneration of starfish,

University of Montreal researchers have identified a gene that allows limb regeneration in the axolotl, a salamander that lives in Mexican lakes.

The gene, called TGF-beta 1, controls the generation and movement of new cells, and allows the axolotl to regrow complex structures like limbs, tail, jaw, spinal cord and even parts of its brain.

Humans also have this gene. The difference is that in humans, instead of telling a limb to regenerate, the gene tells the wounded area to heal and form a scar. If scientists can find a way to manipulate TGF-beta in humans, it could lead to the ability to regrow organs and limbs, as well as treatments for spinal cord injury and severe burns.

No word on whether we will also grow our own feather boas.

In the study, the scientists used a drug that inhibited the gene in axolotls. The treated axolotls couldn’t regrow their limbs, proving that TGF-beta plays a role in regeneration.

http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2007/11/scientists-iden/#ixzz12IebLlKd

But like I originally said ,we are close to regenerating scar tissue with the help of stem cells

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Animals do scar (im sure you have seen atleast one dog with a scar on its face), but I didnt know yuo were specifically talking about regeneration of starfish,

Starfish are different. They have radial symmetry and can regenerate an entirely new starfish. I don't think this would be possible with a human (or desirable either I wouldn't want more than one me running around)

University of Montreal researchers have identified a gene that allows limb regeneration in the axolotl, a salamander that lives in Mexican lakes.

The gene, called TGF-beta 1, controls the generation and movement of new cells, and allows the axolotl to regrow complex structures like limbs, tail, jaw, spinal cord and even parts of its brain.

Humans also have this gene. The difference is that in humans, instead of telling a limb to regenerate, the gene tells the wounded area to heal and form a scar. If scientists can find a way to manipulate TGF-beta in humans, it could lead to the ability to regrow organs and limbs, as well as treatments for spinal cord injury and severe burns.

No word on whether we will also grow our own feather boas.

In the study, the scientists used a drug that inhibited the gene in axolotls. The treated axolotls couldn’t regrow their limbs, proving that TGF-beta plays a role in regeneration.

http://www.wired.com.../#ixzz12IebLlKd

But like I originally said ,we are close to regenerating scar tissue with the help of stem cells

The newt has stem cells in it's body, as do planeria and starfish. Here's a very good lecture on it (an hour long though) It involves that gene you mentioned.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eBpTPhGaHYE

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Looks like this is as close to regeneration as we can get with todays technology.
/>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJqZn9d8a3o&feature=player_embedded

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