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Any thoughts on sunblock and the regimen? Does anyone know of any sunblock I can use which won't cause me to breakout. I do have some mild acne on my back by my shoulder area and that's usually the spot that gets the most sun damage. Any suggestions will be great!

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Any thoughts on sunblock and the regimen? Does anyone know of any sunblock I can use which won't cause me to breakout. I do have some mild acne on my back by my shoulder area and that's usually the spot that gets the most sun damage. Any suggestions will be great!

I believe Aveeno has its Ultra-Calming moisturizer with SPF 15; many people on this forum have recommended it and it is hypoallergenic (unlikely to cause an allergic reaction) and non-comedogenic (doesn't block pores). Just remember to apply moisturizers about fifteen minutes after you do the regimen so that the benzoyl peroxide has adequate time to be absorbed in the skin.

, John

PS: If you can find hypoallergenic, non-comedogenic sunblocks, they are unlikely to interefere with your regimen. However, I would like to stress that you should not expose yourself to a lot of sun until at least three hours after the application of the regimen. Acne medications may increase your skin's sensitivity to UV radiation. It is also not good for you to be out in the sun too much from 10AM-4PM. This time period is when the sun's rays are most intense. Think of it as a bell curve. The most intense rays would be around noon to 2PM, when the sun is pretty much directly overhead. Allow the sun to start setting so that its rays have to travel through more atmosphere and thus more of the UV radiation is absorbed. Tanning around 4PM-5PM might be a good bet unless your skin is overly sensitive. You might even consider tanning close to six. Just remember, when you start to sunburn, stop tanning! That is when the benefits of tanning suddenly stop. So, depending on the amount of sunburn you may get, you may not want to go out again for a day or two. Wait until the sunburn is completely gone plus a day--that's what I say (ooh, I rhymed). Start gradually like with anything. You can look at my thread "The Clear Skin Regimen and the War on Acne."

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I'm using Coppertone oil-free spf 30 on days when I am outside alot. For normal days when I only get incidental sunshine, my moisturizer with spf 15 is fine, but for any sort of length of time outside, I"m putting on that Coppertone.

So far it's been working very well, no sunburn and no breakouts!

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I'm a lifeguard, and my typical hours are from 9:30am -8pm. I can't avoid sun exposure. I have neutrogena dry touch sunlock. My question is, do I need to moisturize AND use the sunblock, or will the sunblock moisturize enough?

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There is a new breakthrough Sunscreen on the market called "L'Oreal Ombrelle SPF 45" - it has 2 new ingredients called Mexoryl and Titanium Dioxide. These 2 ingredients are the most effective things to combat UVA and UVB rays. The majority of sunblocks only protect you from superficial sun damage (which causes skin cancer, etc), however does not protect deep down in your skin to prevent aging of the skin and wrinkles.

This sunblock I have is non-comedogenic, oil free, and fragrance free. The only drawback is it can not be used as a moisturizer, due to the fact Titanium Dioxide does not fully absorb into the skin. It does NOT leave a obvious white mask on your face, it absorbs about 80%, so you can see a minor white glow afterwards.

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I'm a lifeguard, and my typical hours are from 9:30am -8pm. I can't avoid sun exposure. I have neutrogena dry touch sunlock. My question is, do I need to moisturize AND use the sunblock, or will the sunblock moisturize enough?

yes, do go ahead and use your moisturizer, and then apply the sunscreen last.

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There is a new breakthrough Sunscreen on the market called "L'Oreal Ombrelle SPF 45" - it has 2 new ingredients called Mexoryl and Titanium Dioxide. These 2 ingredients are the most effective things to combat UVA and UVB rays. The majority of sunblocks only protect you from superficial sun damage (which causes skin cancer, etc), however does not protect deep down in your skin to prevent aging of the skin and wrinkles.

This sunblock I have is non-comedogenic, oil free, and fragrance free. The only drawback is it can not be used as a moisturizer, due to the fact Titanium Dioxide does not fully absorb into the skin. It does NOT leave a obvious white mask on your face, it absorbs about 80%, so you can see a minor white glow afterwards.

I use Ombrelle too! I have both the SPF 45 (for adults) and the SPF 60 suncream. Titanium Dioxide is actually a well-known physical sunblock ingredient that has been used for years. Mexoryl, on the other hand, is fairly "new" and can only be found in sunscreens in Europe, Canada, and possibly Asia. It is not yet FDA approved in the US. The great thing about Mexoryl is it provides significantly much better protection against UVA rays, which are believed to be the primary cause of photoaging. I live in the US and order mine online from Canada. :ninja:

Citygal, depending on where you live, a sunscreen containing Mexoryl would be an excellent choice. Since Mexoryl is patented by L'Oreal, you could find it in sunscreen brands under the L'Oreal corp. such as Vichy, La Roche Posay, Biotherm, Lancome and of course, Ombrelle, which is cheaper compared to the rest. If you live in the US, Neutrogena's Ultra Sheer Dry-Touch SPF 55 would be a great option. It is photostable and protects well against UVA rays, unlike the SPF 30 & 45 under this line. Most other sunscreens in the US don't provide much protection, if any, against these rays. Hopefully, your local drugstores carry it. It cannot be found locally where I'm at (or maybe I'm not looking hard enough) but oddly, a little up north in the same state, it's everywhere in drugstores! ...okay, I'm exaggerating. I just mean, they have it up north but not here down south.

Also, you could indeed get a sunblock. Sunblocks are different from sunscreens though. Sunblocks have either Zinc Oxide, Titanium Dioxide, or a combination of both. These two are known as "physical ingredients" because they simply "sit" on the skin and provide a physical barrier against UV rays. They block out the rays; hence, the name sunblock. Sunscreens, on the other hand, contain chemical active ingredients that the skin absorbs, such as Mexoryl, and usually, a physical ingredient is added into the mix for added protection. Sunscreens filter out UV rays so as to make them less harmful to the skin. It is quite difficult to recommend a sunblock brand since you hardly find any at stores and there isn't really a well-known sunblock out there (from what I know) so I'm sticking with the sunscreens mentioned. =)

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