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Milk and dairy products

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High school dietary dairy intake and teenage acne

Clement A. Adebamowo, Donna Spiegelman, F. William Danby, A. Lindsay

Frazier, Walter C. Willett, Michelle D. Holmes

Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, February 2005, Vol. 52, No. 2

ABSTRACT:

Background Previous studies suggest possible associations between Western diet and acne. We examined data from the Nurses Health Study II to retrospectively evaluate whether intakes of dairy foods during high school were associated with physician-diagnosed severe teenage acne.

Methods We studied 47,355 women who completed questionnaires on high school diet in 1998 and physician-diagnosed severe teenage acne in 1989. We estimated the prevalence ratios and 95% confidence intervals of acne history across categories of intakes.

Results After accounting for age, age at menarche, body mass index, and energy intake, the multivariate prevalence ratio (95% confidence intervals; P value for test of trend) of acne, comparing extreme categories of intake, were: 1.22 (1.03, 1.44; .002) for total milk; 1.12 (1.00, 1.25; .56) for whole milk; 1.16 (1.01, 1.34; .25) for low-fat milk; and 1.44 (1.21, 1.72; .003) for skim milk. Instant breakfast drink, sherbet, cottage cheese, and cream cheese were also positively associated with acne.

Conclusion We found a positive association with acne for intake of total milk and skim milk. We hypothesize that the association with milk may be because of the presence of hormones and bioactive molecules in milk.

(mail me if you need the original paper)

from discussion: "In this large cohort study of women, we found that intake of milk during adolescence was associated with history of teenage acne. This association was more marked for skim milk than for other forms of milk suggesting that the finding is unlikely to be caused by the fat content of milk. Instant breakfast drink, cream cheese, and cottage cheese were also associated with acne. These associations may be because of the milk content of these foods.

In addition, there was weak inverse association with saturated fat and positive associations with transunsaturated fat and energy intake, which may be caused by chance.We found positive associations with total vitamin D and vitamin D from supplements, and relatively weaker positive associations with vitamin D from foods. The active metabolite of vitamin D, 1a, 25-dihydroxyvitamin D3, plays an important role in epidermal differentiation by inhibiting the proliferation of keratinocytes while augmenting their differentiation.18 It positively interacts with testosterone’s actions in several organs systems.19 Our result suggests that there may be an independent association with vitamin D intake from supplements. We also found positive associations with correlates of early sexual maturity such as BMI and age at onset of menarche, which is consistent with results of other studies.20,21"

We need some vitamin D experts now! Is there a connection between vitamin D supplementation and diseases like acne? If you want some additional info, please read the following paper:

Lisa Tseng, University of California, Los Angeles: Controversies in Vitamin D Supplementation

[attachmentid=434]

nutritionbytes_Dvitamin.pdf

nutritionbytes_Dvitamin.pdf

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Back in October/November, I went on a tangen and was drinking loads of chocolate milk. Accompanied by that I noticed I was experiencing more breakouts. I brought this up to my mom, saying "is it true you can breakout if you drink a lot of milk?" , and of course she looked at me like I was crazy. But, what does she know anyways..... I definitely think milk has an effect on the skin. I just try to take it in moderation for now. But I sure do love chocolate milk lol!!

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Acne comes and goes in quite irregular patterns, so it is very easy to jump to conclusions. If you want to know what might work for you, you should try writing down your acne levels for two months while not drinking any milk, then drinking a lot of milk for two months, and compare. I did this myself, and saw no substantial difference.

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As I know, it was first pointed out in the 50's that there is a link between dairy products and acne, but unfortunately no paper was published at that time. I think it is a milestone in dermatology, since it is the first scientific proof that there is something wrong with our diet.

The authors speculated that some of the "bioactive" molecules are responsible for the acnegenic effect in the milk, and presumably it is one of the hormones. Another interesting fact is that there was a positive association with vitamin D intake, especially in the form of supplements. But if it is the vitamin D supplement that cause acne (which is usually added to milk), you can have problems with other foods as well...

Although, I am not an expert in the field, but I know that natural vitamin D and the artificial supplement is not the same.

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I don't notice a difference with my face, when I drink/eat dairy products, but, hey, somebody said it so I'm not having any more dairy. Wish me luck, I don't know how I'm going to survive without it..........

Lil' off topic: Chocolate Milk Rules! lol

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In desperation I gave up dairy a week ago. I would typically consume 1-2 glasses of milk a day and 2 servings of cheese a day. Only 7 days into this and I have not had any new cysts forming. I'm going to keep it up and see what happens. Its worth a try.

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Everyone is different, but I tried giving up dairy for about 1.5 months and saw no change.

On the vitamin D front, I take supplements. I read that it is VERY important for fair skinned people who avoid the sun because it's a good cancer fighter as well as other things.

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On the vitamin D front, I take supplements.  I read that it is VERY important for fair skinned people who avoid the sun because it's a good cancer fighter as well as other things.

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