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On 1/1/2017 at 10:14 PM, WarrantedAide said:

Sorry to hear about your virus.
So you wont take the B5 anymore and you are confident about your level of oil ?
It means your diet and healthy life style is enough to control your sebum now ?

Happy New year ! Wish you all the clearest skin :)


Yes I found when my diet and exercise was in check and I had some abs visible then oily skin was not a problem, I'd say this is down to controlled glucose/insulin, lower cholesterol lvls, and efficiantly working organs and hormones boosted by a lot of nutrients (nutribullet).

BUT.....
, as of right now coming off being very ill I am fat in the belly area, non existant exercise, and a messed up sleep pattern(this screws with hormone lvls too)
And no surprise I'm super oily again!

So around I go again.  

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Hi Guys

Update: Good and Bad news....

26  days since last post, 
Good: I dropped my weight back down after a regimented exercise routine for about 16days of cycling and weights non-stop each day after the last post, belly was gone and abs came back and arms show some vascularity and hey presto my skin is dry again. Then ...
Bad: Got lazy over the last 10 days and started eating..alot! belly has bulged back a bit and yup oily skin too. Life!


Instead of sulking, there is something I can learn here. Clearly I'm no Whale to be able to show abs from a little belly fat to vasculer within weeks, this makes it clear that the fat and Cholesterol "build up" idea is indeed setting off my oily skin production.
Time for some research....

Source : Wikipedia...


What is Sebum made of?....

Sebum[edit]

Sebum, secreted by the sebaceous gland in humans, is primarily composed of triglycerides (~41%), wax esters (~26%), squalene (~12%), and free fatty acids (~16%).

What I've Learned: So Sebum is 41% triglycerides, interesting.  



What stimulates its release?....
Source : Wikipedia..
Sex steroids are known to affect the rate of sebum secretion; androgens such as testosterone have been shown to stimulate secretion, andestrogens have been shown to inhibit secretion.[16] Dihydrotestosterone acts as the primary androgen in the prostate and in hair follicles.[17][18

What I've Learned: The quote here "known to affect the rate of sebum secretion" sebum is "already loaded up" in the body at this point and hormones unleash it. "Sex steroids are known to affect the rate of sebum secretion" Dihydrotestosterone is the primary culprit here.


Now as Sebum is 41 % triglycerides, ....
 

What are triglycerides?

Triglycerides are the main form of fat in the body. When you think of fat developing and being stored in your hips or belly, you're thinking of triglycerides. Consider these things:

  • The fat we eat exists in relatively huge molecules inside food. Triglycerides are the end product of digesting and breaking down these bulky fats.
  • Any extra food we eat that's not used for activity right away - carbohydrates, fat, or protein - is also chemically converted into triglycerides.
  • Triglycerides are then bundled together into globules. These are transported through the blood. Proteins (called lipoproteins) help transport these triglyceride blobs.
  • The triglycerides are taken up by adipose (fat) cells to be used for energy if food isn't available later- or during your next diet.

What I've Learned: quote "Any extra food we eat that's  "not used for activity" right away - carbohydrates, fat, or protein - is also chemically converted into triglycerides." 


Now for the Trigger....
Dihydrotestosterone

Print Print | Email  Email article to a friend | Last updated: January 06, 2015

How is dihydrotestosterone controlled?

The amount of dihydrotestosterone present in the body from day to day depends on the amount of testosterone present. When levels of testosterone increase, more of it is converted to dihydrotestosterone and so levels of dihydrotestosterone therefore also increase as a result.

Control of dihydrotestosterone levels in the body is therefore achieved through control of testosterone production, which is controlled by the hypothalamus and the pituitary gland.  In response to decreasing levels of testosterone (and therefore reduced amounts of dihydrotestosterone), the hypothalamus releases gonadotrophin-releasing hormone which travels to the pituitary gland, stimulating it to produce and release luteinising hormone into the bloodstream. Luteinising hormone in the blood then travels to the Leydig cells in the testes in men (or ovaries in women) and stimulates them to produce more testosterone. As testosterone in the blood increases, more of it is also converted to dihydrotestosterone, resulting in higher levels of dihydrotestosterone as well.

What happens if I have too much dihydrotestosterone?

Too much dihydrotestosterone, often resulting from excess testosterone production, has variable effects on men and women. It is unlikely that levels of dihydrotestosterone will be raised before the start of puberty. It is also unlikely that adult men with too much dihydrotestosterone would undergo recognisable changes. Women with too much dihydrotestosterone may develop increased body, facial and pubic hair growth (called hirsutism), stopping of menstrual periods (amenorrhoea) and increased acne. Abnormal changes to the genitalia may also occur in women with too much dihydrotestosterone.

What happens if I have too little dihydrotestosterone?

Dihydrotestosterone is thought to have fewer effects in women and, as a result, it is believed they are relatively unaffected by having too little dihydrotestosterone. It is possible, however, that the start of puberty may be delayed in girls with too little dihydrotestosterone and the amount of pubic and body hair present in adult females may also be reduced.

In contrast, low levels of dihydrotestosterone in men can have dramatic effects. If there is too little dihydrotestosterone whilst male foetuses are still in the womb, for example, they may not be ‘masculinised’ and their genitalia may seem similar to that seen in girls of the same age. Later, boys with too little dihydrotestosterone may undergo some of the changes usually seen in puberty (such as muscle growth and production of sperm) but will not develop normal body hair growth and genital development. 

 



 

CONCLUSION:
My protocol has been effecting the quantity of excess triglycerides in my body, remember we learned that Sebum is made from 41% triglycerides. And that any extra food we eat that's  "not used for activity" right away - carbohydrates, fat, or protein - is chemically converted into triglycerides. SO each time I drop my body fat to become Abs visible and Vascular hey presto my skin is oil free. Makes perfect sense. The supply for the Sebum factory is being restricted.

Now to the second part and unfortunatly the reason we as Oily people are different to everyone else, EVEN those who are very fat and should have a massive supply of Sebum producing triglycerides available. Which is the trigger and unleasher of Sebum- dihyrotestosterone, in excess. Our genes decided that we are coded to produce excess DHT and or be hyper sensitive to it. And that's it.

The option of either I have too much DHT or am hyper sensitive to it , or more likely a combination of both. Leaves a problem, do I want to start messing with the amount of DHT I produce. Via Finesteride, dutasteride, Saw palmetto etc.. and i HAVE tried this several times over the years with very little to no success. In theory it should have worked, but it just didn't.

Its unfair tbh that those who are hugely overweight have better skin than those of us who are slightly tubby at times but have excess DHT/hyper sensitivity, that causes the unleashing of sebum at the slightest fat gain. Lifes unfair so i'll make lemondade, ...  

So the only option (apart from Accutane which is about as safe in the long run as a daily shot of vodka), is fat and triglyceride reduction and control. 
Achieved via diet, exercise, and supplements that assist in fat metabolism.

(Now i inderstand how and why pantethine works. quote "Pantethine increases the concentrations of chemicals that lower blood cholesterol and triglycerides.")... When I used to be on B5 many years ago, I couldn't understand why it worked for a short period and then stopped. All I recognised was that I had put on some weight but didn't put the two together in terms of all of this.

I hope this is helpful for some of you, and would like to hear from anyone trying this method out. 
From the start of this blog my theory and regime was based simply on experience and trial and error, but with a little more research exactly what is happening is so much clearer.


All the best  

 

(Lastly, I have purchased a few days ago a red infrared lamp after reading its supposed benefits in reducing oily skin. I'll report back on this later. ) 







 



   Edited by OilyOneCanobe

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Hi OilyOneCanobe,

Thanks for sharing your journey. It sometimes feels like you'll go to the ends of the earth to find an answer for your oily skin. I've had a similar journey, full of ups and downs, but I'm in a really good place right now with it. Here some takeaways from my journey... 

For starters, the goal I set for skin is to get back to balance, or homeostasis. Without this goal, any solution you find will be temporary. This is why I don't see using large quantities of anything as a solution, it's only a matter of time before your body rebels against those solutions. 

My realization came when I saw that someone can eat the same things as me, use the same skincare, take the same supplements, and not have oily skin. To me this meant the answer definitely lies within our body. Instead of trying to fight oil, I wanted to figure out how to get my body back to a point where it, well, just behaved like it should.

What I found was that most people with oily skin have 3 deeper issues that prevent them from being normal, and if you manage to address all 3, you put yourself in position to get back to normal. I'm still fine tuning these, but so far they are: 1. a fatty acid (linoleic) deficiency, 2. excessive dht conversion, and 3. chronic stress that your skin can't escape. I don't know a single person with oily skin that don't have these, including my old self. These issues don't cause oily skin, but once they're addressed, they can make oily skin almost disappear. Of course, it's sometimes more art than science getting these right, as each person has different contributing factors. 

From where you stand now, I would recommend the following - 

1. Use only gentle products on your skin that have high quantities of linoleic acid and low quantities of oleic acid. Your sebum has changed to a thick sticky sebum, and it's the fatty acid content that contributes to this. By using only specific oils, you can mimic the effect of having normal sebum. PM me if you want some specific product recommendations. 

The next step, hanging the makeup of your sebum, is a little more challenging. As you've noted with your triglyceride observation above, the wrong fats and oils can send you into a tailspin. I always try and get some natural omega 3 fatty acids into my diet, every day, and I find if I do, my body produces sebum that seems to be lighter and less greasy looking. I think that's vital, but what I also think is happening is your body can't handle low quality omega 6 oils anymore, like cooking oils, fried foods, etc. I recommend giving your body easy to tolerate doses of high quality omega 3, and take supplements that support the process of breaking down fats. Betaine HCL with pepsin is one I realized I needed, and when I combined that with a supplement that helped thin and promote bile production (AF Betafood or, beet root, essentially), the results were great. If you can't process fats, there's almost no chance your body is able to get any fat soluble vitamins, which is why you probably had to take a boat load of vitamin A to see any results. Instead of focusing on more, focus on better efficiency. Give your body a "softball", so to speak, an small, simple, easy to digest meal to get back on track. For me, eating just sardines with those recommended supplements gave my body what it needed for the first time in years, and my oily skin responded very positively. 

2. Unless you want to always be super reactive to your triggers, you need to reset your hormones. For your skin, it's easy. Green Tea Extract, diluted to around 3% will gradually reduce sebum output by controlling the conversion of testosterone to dht (topically). It'll take weeks to see results, but stick with it (and be sure to moisturize and use products that will support the stress your skin will go through in the process). Initial studies are proving it works.

Internally, I had a lot of luck using ashwagandha. It's an adaptogenic herb that does wonders for calming your body's response to stress triggers. When my oily skin went from "much better" to "holy sh*t , I think I'm normal again" was when I added in that herb. Of course, I was already on the right track by doing a paleo type diet, cutting out sugars, reducing grains and dairy, supporting my gut with probiotics, taking some supplements,  etc. But this took me to another level. Combine this with the green tea extract, and mmmm boy...

3. Understand the stress your body is experiencing. Your body can't be normal with deficiencies, and in times of stress, it needs more raw materials than when it's normal.  Vitamin B complex (especially Riboflavin for me), zinc, and all the vitamins and minerals you take should work to get the body to operate as normal. No crazy doses of anything, just looking to gentle support the body's ultimate goal of homeostasis. Use these while you deal with removing stress. 

The reason your body, or any part of it, leaves homeostasis is stress. Not emotional stress, per say, but physical stress or strain. Stress is ok in small doses, it makes the body swing into gear, and it's kind of the magic that makes life possible for us. But we can't abuse this power. If we do, it leads to exhaustion, which is the start of every chronic skin problem.
 
This is the reason for gentle skincare, the reason for avoiding anything inflammation inducing in your diet. The body can't operate as it should when stress has impacted it to the point of exhaustion, and that's what everyone with oily skin has right now, somewhere inside (or outside) his or her body. It's a very personal journey to spot and recover from this stress, but it's vital for every journey, or you'll always be fighting an uphill battle.

My journey settled into a really good place, and then stayed there once I started to strip away all stressors. My facial skincare regimen is now 1 product, once daily, and it's not even a cleanser. My supplements are as needed, but my diet and exercise are staples in my life. My skin is acne free, pores are a fraction of the size they used to be, and the natural oils feel great on my skin (That part actually takes time, to realize that natural oils from the right diet are ok, and wont turn your face into an irritating, greasy mess). I'm here to answer questions, if you want, but most importantly, let us know how you do with your next steps. It has been fun following along with your journey, and we'd all love to see it end in a great place.

Nate

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On 2/21/2017 at 10:47 PM, MyBody101 said:

Hi OilyOneCanobe,

Thanks for sharing your journey. It sometimes feels like you'll go to the ends of the earth to find an answer for your oily skin. I've had a similar journey, full of ups and downs, but I'm in a really good place right now with it. Here some takeaways from my journey... 

For starters, the goal I set for skin is to get back to balance, or homeostasis. Without this goal, any solution you find will be temporary. This is why I don't see using large quantities of anything as a solution, it's only a matter of time before your body rebels against those solutions. 

My realization came when I saw that someone can eat the same things as me, use the same skincare, take the same supplements, and not have oily skin. To me this meant the answer definitely lies within our body. Instead of trying to fight oil, I wanted to figure out how to get my body back to a point where it, well, just behaved like it should.

What I found was that most people with oily skin have 3 deeper issues that prevent them from being normal, and if you manage to address all 3, you put yourself in position to get back to normal. I'm still fine tuning these, but so far they are: 1. a fatty acid (linoleic) deficiency, 2. excessive dht conversion, and 3. chronic stress that your skin can't escape. I don't know a single person with oily skin that don't have these, including my old self. These issues don't cause oily skin, but once they're addressed, they can make oily skin almost disappear. Of course, it's sometimes more art than science getting these right, as each person has different contributing factors. 

From where you stand now, I would recommend the following - 

1. Use only gentle products on your skin that have high quantities of linoleic acid and low quantities of oleic acid. Your sebum has changed to a thick sticky sebum, and it's the fatty acid content that contributes to this. By using only specific oils, you can mimic the effect of having normal sebum. PM me if you want some specific product recommendations. 

The next step, hanging the makeup of your sebum, is a little more challenging. As you've noted with your triglyceride observation above, the wrong fats and oils can send you into a tailspin. I always try and get some natural omega 3 fatty acids into my diet, every day, and I find if I do, my body produces sebum that seems to be lighter and less greasy looking. I think that's vital, but what I also think is happening is your body can't handle low quality omega 6 oils anymore, like cooking oils, fried foods, etc. I recommend giving your body easy to tolerate doses of high quality omega 3, and take supplements that support the process of breaking down fats. Betaine HCL with pepsin is one I realized I needed, and when I combined that with a supplement that helped thin and promote bile production (AF Betafood or, beet root, essentially), the results were great. If you can't process fats, there's almost no chance your body is able to get any fat soluble vitamins, which is why you probably had to take a boat load of vitamin A to see any results. Instead of focusing on more, focus on better efficiency. Give your body a "softball", so to speak, an small, simple, easy to digest meal to get back on track. For me, eating just sardines with those recommended supplements gave my body what it needed for the first time in years, and my oily skin responded very positively. 

2. Unless you want to always be super reactive to your triggers, you need to reset your hormones. For your skin, it's easy. Green Tea Extract, diluted to around 3% will gradually reduce sebum output by controlling the conversion of testosterone to dht (topically). It'll take weeks to see results, but stick with it (and be sure to moisturize and use products that will support the stress your skin will go through in the process). Initial studies are proving it works.

Internally, I had a lot of luck using ashwagandha. It's an adaptogenic herb that does wonders for calming your body's response to stress triggers. When my oily skin went from "much better" to "holy sh*t , I think I'm normal again" was when I added in that herb. Of course, I was already on the right track by doing a paleo type diet, cutting out sugars, reducing grains and dairy, supporting my gut with probiotics, taking some supplements,  etc. But this took me to another level. Combine this with the green tea extract, and mmmm boy...

3. Understand the stress your body is experiencing. Your body can't be normal with deficiencies, and in times of stress, it needs more raw materials than when it's normal.  Vitamin B complex (especially Riboflavin for me), zinc, and all the vitamins and minerals you take should work to get the body to operate as normal. No crazy doses of anything, just looking to gentle support the body's ultimate goal of homeostasis. Use these while you deal with removing stress. 

The reason your body, or any part of it, leaves homeostasis is stress. Not emotional stress, per say, but physical stress or strain. Stress is ok in small doses, it makes the body swing into gear, and it's kind of the magic that makes life possible for us. But we can't abuse this power. If we do, it leads to exhaustion, which is the start of every chronic skin problem.
 
This is the reason for gentle skincare, the reason for avoiding anything inflammation inducing in your diet. The body can't operate as it should when stress has impacted it to the point of exhaustion, and that's what everyone with oily skin has right now, somewhere inside (or outside) his or her body. It's a very personal journey to spot and recover from this stress, but it's vital for every journey, or you'll always be fighting an uphill battle.

My journey settled into a really good place, and then stayed there once I started to strip away all stressors. My facial skincare regimen is now 1 product, once daily, and it's not even a cleanser. My supplements are as needed, but my diet and exercise are staples in my life. My skin is acne free, pores are a fraction of the size they used to be, and the natural oils feel great on my skin (That part actually takes time, to realize that natural oils from the right diet are ok, and wont turn your face into an irritating, greasy mess). I'm here to answer questions, if you want, but most importantly, let us know how you do with your next steps. It has been fun following along with your journey, and we'd all love to see it end in a great place.

Nate


Hi Nate , thanks for the great info

I've often thought that the stripping of skin oils every day irritates more than helps and contributes to overstimulating my skin oil, so would like to know more about the linoleic product you use. I have tried in the past the no face washing approach and skin calmed down initially but then broke out unfortunatly.. so perhaps a step too far, but there was a marked skin calmness in the first few days. As u mentioned that linoleic mimics normal skin this rang a bell!

The linoleic deficiency you mention, do u mean internally also? As I thought that omega 3's lvls were more in need of care than omega'6?

I agree that dht lvls and chronic stress are oily skin major factors, I have had massive massive lvls of both in the past. So unsurprisingly my lifetime of oily skin has been off the scale. Things are looking up , as factors of health are being improved. And my skin is now far far less oily, less red, and less bloated. 
My current regime is getting little tweaks, but is now as followed.. 

food:
Breakfast- 
Nutribullet smoothie...
2 fruits
Spinach
Celery
Carrot
Nuts
Blue-berries
2x teaspoons cocoa
Tablespoon of Apple Cider Vin

Lunch:
Usually Pasta with meat and tomato sauce (I'm italian, need Pasta!:) with steamed red cabbage, green cabbage, brocolli, and cauliflowers (steamed, chopped and stirred into sauce..yum!)

Dinner is eggs, and a big salad lettuce, spinach, tomato's, olives.

I drink about 5-10 coffee's a day. (Coffee research has been divided for years, but at the moment has some interesting results regarding fat in the blood and coffee correlation, so I am happy to go along with this one.Love coffee!)

Swapped all cows Milk for Almond milk. 


Then the alternative stuff I do:
I now have added is 10min a day of red low light therapy, after reading research papers on its effects on skin healing. So far so good.

Supplements
2xOmega 3 pills
1xB complex
1x VIT d and Calcium (there is no sun here)  

Skin care routine:
Wash/exfoliate , tea-tree toner, vit c toner, moisturise, differin 0.1%
And I derma-roll once every 4 weeks.

Exercise:
Enough to burn blood sugar out of my system, and some weights.

Other factors
Get quality sleep at night, keep stress very low. And Keep body fat to an abs visible lvl.

I'm not super strict following this all, but it is my go-to regime each day. Which is showing to be good enough by the results

  Edited by OilyOneCanobe

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On 2/23/2017 at 6:40 AM, WarrantedAide said:
Very good post, a lot of common sense. A huge thanks.
One small question: when you talk about green tea, how do you apply it locally? A tea bag wet on the face?

Hi WarrantedAide,

You actually want to find the plant that green tea is made from, Camellia sinensis, and without picking it from the ground, hold your face against it for 2 - 4 hours. 

Kidding of course.

Use a green tea extract, alcohol free, that way the EGCGs are intact when it hits your skin. That would be tough to do with a tea bag. EGCGs are "The most significant phytochemical in green tea is a polyphenol called epigallocatechin-3-gallate, or EGCG for short" and are GREAT for sebum reduction when used over weeks or months.

This is the brand I started with - 

https://www.amazon.com/Natures-Answer-Alcohol-Free-Green-1-Fluid/dp/B004GWASAU/ref=sr_1_12_s_it?s=hpc&ie=UTF8&qid=1488515570&sr=1-12&keywords=green+tea+extract


A single bottle of that will last you years, but warning, it's strong as sh*t. I highly recommend diluting it in a grapdeseed carrier oil, and using 20 drops of grapeseed oil for every 1 of green tea extract. Mix really well, and apply no more than 3 drops onto your face at night of the mixture. I saw really good results putting it on my face for a half hour to an hour, then washing it off. It takes time to do it's thing, so be patient!

 

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On 2/25/2017 at 1:25 PM, OilyOneCanobe said:

Hi OilyOneCanobe (GREAT name btw, makes me laugh every time I see it)
 
Quote

The linoleic deficiency you mention, do u mean internally also? As I thought that omega 3's lvls were more in need of care than omega'6?


That's the biggest puzzle when it comes to oily skin, and probably the single biggest reason there's not a full understanding of it! We get (by doctors accounts) a lot of omega 6 in our diets, yet our skin is deficient in omega 6, and that leads to a host of skin troubles (if you have oily skin, or acne). That's why I suggest applying it topically while you figure out your internal stuff.

A body that can digest fats appropriately is EVERYTHING when it comes to oily skin, and internally, it means a proper ratio of omega 3 to omega 6 oils (shoot for a 1 to 1 ratio, which is really hard, but allows for a little wiggle room when you don't hit it). What throws everyone off is the crazy amount of oxidized toxic omega 6 oils (like you find in cooking oils and processed food), which is why it's very important to get a lot of omega 3, reduce the omega 6 toxic stuff, get some high quality omega 6, and definitely use the supplements (like beet root and betaine HCL) to help your body actually use all these good  fatty acids you consume, or really all your efforts are for not.

Your diet looks good, but there's ways to tighten it up some. A few teaks there will probably allow you to have to do less in the skincare an alternative therapies. 

I would cut out the fruits and pasta. Those simple carbs lead to "insulin resistance and chronically high levels of these acne-causing hormones." I have some italian in me too, and started converting over to some sausage and peppers.

Also, another thing, switch at least 2 cups of coffee a day over to a tea. A crazy study in 2012 showed the chinese rate of sensitive skin is around 20%, compared to 80% for the rest of the world. One of the major things they do is to not treat things first with skincare, but rather use teas to detox.  Heal from within. Solid concept that has great results. I recommend is Puer tea, which should be taken after fatty greasy meals, helps with digestion. 

For your supplements, I may add zinc into the mix if you feel you're deficient. I feel like there's some kind of thyroid support that would help too, but I don't know enough to recommend anything.

I feel like if you added beet root (or each beets with every fatty meal) and take some Betaine HCL (or possibly even do a shot of raw apple cider vinegar like Braggs) before meals, it would help tremendously. 

I use this beet root supplement - 

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B017KYQCFU/ref=twister_B017KYQCEG?_encoding=UTF8&psc=1

Lasts 6 months to a year depending on use, and it's under $20. 

PM me if you want specific skincare advice, happy to share those privately. 
 

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@MyBody101 " I highly recommend diluting it in a grapdeseed carrier oil, and using 20 drops of grapeseed oil for every 1 of green tea extract. Mix really well, and apply no more than 3 drops onto your face at night of the mixture"

Hi, I read your share and have some questions, please answer me. Thanks.

1. Would you recomment the place selling Grapeseed Carrier Oil?
2. As I understand, so in order to use the mixture, I need to mix Grapeseed Oil with Green Tea Extract in a bottle following the ratio 20:1 then use 3 drops every night. Right?

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After doing some research into green tea thanks to the heads up from @MyBody101, the results achieved in several studies are interesting. No matter if its brewed tea, extract combined with emulsion carrier, or even combined with distilled water. They still get good % reductions in oily skin across the board.
So a quarter cup of green tea brewed for drinking, and then using the tea bag to soak on my face in the evening has been added to my regime. I was concerned that perhaps the ECGC would just evaporate and not sink into my skin. But the results some of the studies have achieved from a varied chain of methods suggest that brewed tea should do the trick, especially if the brewing is limited to a quarter cup (just enough to cover the tea).

At the moment I'm throwing everything and the kitchen sink at my oily skin, I'm pleased to say as my health markers improve my oily skin is vastly improving also

The Oil's have been strong with the dark-side for too long,
closer to a memory one day it shall be ... yesss.
  

Edited by OilyOneCanobe

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On 3/19/2017 at 4:08 AM, Sunny88 said:
@MyBody101 " I highly recommend diluting it in a grapdeseed carrier oil, and using 20 drops of grapeseed oil for every 1 of green tea extract. Mix really well, and apply no more than 3 drops onto your face at night of the mixture"

Hi, I read your share and have some questions, please answer me. Thanks.

1. Would you recomment the place selling Grapeseed Carrier Oil?
2. As I understand, so in order to use the mixture, I need to mix Grapeseed Oil with Green Tea Extract in a bottle following the ratio 20:1 then use 3 drops every night. Right?
Hi Sunny88,

I don't have a recommendation in mind for grapeseed oil. You can probably find a high quality one on Amazon for not a lot of money. Try to get organic if you can. At this stage of the game, the green tea extract is far more important than the carrier oil you place it in. 

You are correct in the process for making it as well. You should only use it on the oily areas of your skin, as it can dry out other areas. 

Just remember, if you don't try and fix the fatty acid absorption issue in your body, your skin will still produce the thick, sticky kind of oil, just less of it. You must address those organs, as well as keeping a 1:1 omega 3 to omega 6 (or at least try for that ratio) in order to have sebum that's thin and that feels great on your face. Hormones too are another biggie too...
10 hours ago, OilyOneCanobe said:

After doing some research into green tea thanks to the heads up from @MyBody101, the results achieved in several studies are interesting. No matter if its brewed tea, extract combined with emulsion carrier, or even combined with distilled water. They still get good % reductions in oily skin across the board.
So a quarter cup of green tea brewed for drinking, and then using the tea bag to soak on my face in the evening has been added to my regime. I was concerned that perhaps the ECGC would just evaporate and not sink into my skin. But the results some of the studies have achieved from a varied chain of methods suggest that brewed tea should do the trick, especially if the brewing is limited to a quarter cup (just enough to cover the tea).

At the moment I'm throwing everything and the kitchen sink at my oily skin, I'm pleased to say as my health markers improve my oily skin is vastly improving also

The Oil's have been strong with the dark-side for too long,
closer to a memory one day it shall be ... yesss.
  

Excellent! 

I'm doing some additional research on the HPA axis, will report back soon with a possible connection to excess testosterone being produced...

 

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@MyBody101 Thanks for your reply.

I am taking Kirkland Omega 3 Fish Oil 1000mg/day (equal 300mg Omega 3 (EPA > DHA).  Is this supplement considered "high quality"?
And regarding to support the bile production, could I eat daikon ( https://goo.gl/58RIoG ) instead of beetroot?

Thanks,

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20 hours ago, Sunny88 said:
@MyBody101 Thanks for your reply.

I am taking Kirkland Omega 3 Fish Oil 1000mg/day (equal 300mg Omega 3 (EPA > DHA).  Is this supplement considered "high quality"?
And regarding to support the bile production, could I eat daikon ( https://goo.gl/58RIoG ) instead of beetroot?

Thanks,
I believe daikon and beets do slightly different things, but both seem like they can be of benefit. Daikon helps to stimulate bile production and eliminate fats, while beets thin bile, so their duties are slightly different. Both beneficial, but thinning bile seems to be important for oily skin. However, you should try it out and report back what you find out. 

I would not consider kirkland brand high quality, just because it's more of a mass produced product with unspecified content. It's always hard to say how long the product has been sitting on shelves or in a warehouse somewhere, and what conditions the product has been exposed to.

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17 hours ago, Sunny88 said:

After eating beetroot, I see that color of my poo is purple. Do you think it is normal?


Shouldn't happen unless its Undigested beets, or partly digested. Avoid drinking with your meal, 30min before and after. If still happens then an apple cider vinegar shot 30min pre-meal should help. Works for me.  
 

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Hey OilyOneCanobe,
I've known your topic since you first started writing, it's nice to know that you're still keeping us updated, keep on the good work!

In my previous post on your topic, I mentioned that I was taking 10mg of Roaccutane per day. Overall, I was very pleased with my results during the time I was taking it. However, I completed my course less than 2 months ago, and I already have my very oily skin back, along with bad, inflamed acne that's pretty awful. It's clearly not as bad as before Accutane, but still it's a big step back.

The only conclusion is that Roaccutane didn't solve the root problem of my acne, and even if I will take it again, the acne will probably return. You can see a more detailed description here, if you have time.

Anyway, with no intention to hijack your topic, I'd like to ask you a few questions, that should help me and others in similar situations:

1) I remember you mentioned taking Accutane. If so, what dose did you take, and for how long? Did you reach your cumulative dose? For how long were you satisfied with your skin after stopping it?

2) Do you manage to keep your oil under control using your regimen, such that you can live a "normal" life? If so, does this work under (very) stressful conditions?

3) Do you think it's worth the time and money to invest into making some healthy smoothies? Did you notice any improvements directly linked to them? Most people are very positive about them, but I can't see how some veggies can have any effect on such persistent acne.

4) Are there any supplements that you recommend for long-term use? I think a mega dose might be useful to kick things up, but I'm not so sure about prolonged use. I took some "famous" supplements like zinc, saw palmetto and multivitamins some years ago but they didn't seem to help.

5) I am almost 20, and I am pretty sure that my acne is hormonal. Do you think that supplements that inhibit DHT might be too dangerous for men, or are they worth the risk? I am seriously considering taking some saw palmetto, green tea extract, etc.

Thank you and I hope you have some time to look over my questions.

Edited by mateus560276

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5 hours ago, mateus560276 said:

Hey OilyOneCanobe,
I've known your topic since you first started writing, it's nice to know that you're still keeping us updated, keep on the good work!

In my previous post on your topic, I mentioned that I was taking 10mg of Roaccutane per day. Overall, I was very pleased with my results during the time I was taking it. However, I completed my course less than 2 months ago, and I already have my very oily skin back, along with bad, inflamed acne that's pretty awful. It's clearly not as bad as before Accutane, but still it's a big step back.

The only conclusion is that Roaccutane didn't solve the root problem of my acne, and even if I will take it again, the acne will probably return. You can see a more detailed description here, if you have time.

Anyway, with no intention to hijack your topic, I'd like to ask you a few questions, that should help me and others in similar situations:

1) I remember you mentioned taking Accutane. If so, what dose did you take, and for how long? Did you reach your cumulative dose? For how long were you satisfied with your skin after stopping it?

2) Do you manage to keep your oil under control using your regimen, such that you can live a "normal" life? If so, does this work under (very) stressful conditions?

3) Do you think it's worth the time and money to invest into making some healthy smoothies? Did you notice any improvements directly linked to them? Most people are very positive about them, but I can't see how some veggies can have any effect on such persistent acne.

4) Are there any supplements that you recommend for long-term use? I think a mega dose might be useful to kick things up, but I'm not so sure about prolonged use. I took some "famous" supplements like zinc, saw palmetto and multivitamins some years ago but they didn't seem to help.

5) I am almost 20, and I am pretty sure that my acne is hormonal. Do you think that supplements that inhibit DHT might be too dangerous for men, or are they worth the risk? I am seriously considering taking some saw palmetto, green tea extract, etc.

Thank you and I hope you have some time to look over my questions.

Absolutely do not take saw palmetto. Research PFS and propecia and accutane sexual side effects for that matter!

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19 minutes ago, hatetane said:
Absolutely do not take saw palmetto. Research PFS and propecia and accutane sexual side effects for that matter!

Could you be a little more detailed about what would be dangerous in taking this supplement? From what I've seen, the side-effects are usually quite mild and reversible. There are men taking it for other health issues. If the problem is indeed hormonal, then shouldn't it be able to help?

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On 4/11/2017 at 9:24 AM, mateus560276 said:

Hey OilyOneCanobe,
I've known your topic since you first started writing, it's nice to know that you're still keeping us updated, keep on the good work!

In my previous post on your topic, I mentioned that I was taking 10mg of Roaccutane per day. Overall, I was very pleased with my results during the time I was taking it. However, I completed my course less than 2 months ago, and I already have my very oily skin back, along with bad, inflamed acne that's pretty awful. It's clearly not as bad as before Accutane, but still it's a big step back.

The only conclusion is that Roaccutane didn't solve the root problem of my acne, and even if I will take it again, the acne will probably return. You can see a more detailed description here, if you have time.

Anyway, with no intention to hijack your topic, I'd like to ask you a few questions, that should help me and others in similar situations:

1) I remember you mentioned taking Accutane. If so, what dose did you take, and for how long? Did you reach your cumulative dose? For how long were you satisfied with your skin after stopping it?

2) Do you manage to keep your oil under control using your regimen, such that you can live a "normal" life? If so, does this work under (very) stressful conditions?

3) Do you think it's worth the time and money to invest into making some healthy smoothies? Did you notice any improvements directly linked to them? Most people are very positive about them, but I can't see how some veggies can have any effect on such persistent acne.

4) Are there any supplements that you recommend for long-term use? I think a mega dose might be useful to kick things up, but I'm not so sure about prolonged use. I took some "famous" supplements like zinc, saw palmetto and multivitamins some years ago but they didn't seem to help.

5) I am almost 20, and I am pretty sure that my acne is hormonal. Do you think that supplements that inhibit DHT might be too dangerous for men, or are they worth the risk? I am seriously considering taking some saw palmetto, green tea extract, etc.

Thank you and I hope you have some time to look over my questions.

Hi
Just seen this, my notifications were off for some reason. Will answer ur questions later tonight:) 

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On 4/11/2017 at 9:24 AM, mateus560276 said:

Hey OilyOneCanobe,
I've known your topic since you first started writing, it's nice to know that you're still keeping us updated, keep on the good work!

In my previous post on your topic, I mentioned that I was taking 10mg of Roaccutane per day. Overall, I was very pleased with my results during the time I was taking it. However, I completed my course less than 2 months ago, and I already have my very oily skin back, along with bad, inflamed acne that's pretty awful. It's clearly not as bad as before Accutane, but still it's a big step back.

The only conclusion is that Roaccutane didn't solve the root problem of my acne, and even if I will take it again, the acne will probably return. You can see a more detailed description here, if you have time.

Anyway, with no intention to hijack your topic, I'd like to ask you a few questions, that should help me and others in similar situations:

1) I remember you mentioned taking Accutane. If so, what dose did you take, and for how long? Did you reach your cumulative dose? For how long were you satisfied with your skin after stopping it?

I took it for 18months, ending on either 60 or 80mg a day I can't remember which (some years ago now).
The first 12months the dosage was much lower and did nothing for me, when the dosage was upped over the last 6months my acne was finally fixed and gone. 
Acne was gone, but oily skin returned. BUT thankfully the super oily skin couldn't create acne anymore. Thank the gods! Then I became oILYoNEcAnobe, not quite the rise of batman but a fella got to start somewhere.
  


2) Do you manage to keep your oil under control using your regimen, such that you can live a "normal" life? If so, does this work under (very) stressful conditions?

I am 80-90% to a normal persons skin oil production I'd say, so well within happy limits for me. Coming from having enough Oil production before that I was at risk of being invaded, its a miracle! 
BUT as you pointed out, very stressful conditions cause chaos, and all bets are off!  Even with my regime, if my stress lvls go up then I can't control the oil production for very long. Although my buffer for this has improved in this regard.
 First and foremost get to sleep early each night, late nights seem to increase my stress lvls (cortisol and Circadian rhythm) is a hormone bomb. 
Try and control stress in the day where u can.


3) Do you think it's worth the time and money to invest into making some healthy smoothies? Did you notice any improvements directly linked to them? Most people are very positive about them, but I can't see how some veggies can have any effect on such persistent acne.

Personally it was roaccutane at a high dosage under medical supervision that ended my acne. 
If you can buy a nutribullet or other blender then £5-10 of produce a week is worth every penny imo, although I can't attribute it to how my acne got fixed. It has rejuvinated my skin as of now, i'd rather be made of spinach for breakfast than frosted flakes:)  
 


4) Are there any supplements that you recommend for long-term use? I think a mega dose might be useful to kick things up, but I'm not so sure about prolonged use. I took some "famous" supplements like zinc, saw palmetto and multivitamins some years ago but they didn't seem to help.

I've done the megadosing route before of...b5, Pantothen, NAC, fish oils. My initial route was to mega dose everything and hit the oily skin problem with a hammer. This was the dark-side! And really the wrong direction. 

Saw-Palmetto ..yep I done that too! And it didn't work, In that direction of DHT control I also tried finasteride and dutasteride!! All a mistake in my opinion now.  I attacked the problem with a sledge hammer when it needed a more delicate touch. 
 
The suppements I take now are thinking more in regards to adrenal support, and supressing inflammation..
I take 15mg of zinc a day, a B-complex, calcium&VitD , And Omega 3's in terms of supplements. Nothing megadosed. 
((Far Far Above all of this is controling 1.Diet, 2. Stress and Sleep, 3. Exercise))

Everything I do is for Oily Skin control right now, BUT if I hadn't gone on the higher dosage of roaccutane years ago I don't know where I'd be right now. Oily skin supression does control acne, but TBH if I were speaking to myself at 19 I'd say get down the dr's to discuss roaccutane again. My acne was terrible back then, I looked like Jabba the hutts bride! 
Fix acne under medical supervision then fix hormonal Oily skin later, doing both at the same time may be possible for some. But for those of us who are the "OilyOnes" it would be more difficult doing both.

5) I am almost 20, and I am pretty sure that my acne is hormonal. Do you think that supplements that inhibit DHT might be too dangerous for men, or are they worth the risk? I am seriously considering taking some saw palmetto, green tea extract, etc.

Green tea is mentioned in prior posts, I use a green-tea bag every evening. Drink the tea, and squeeze the bag over face area. It was brought to my attention by another Oily friend on here :) 

Thank you and I hope you have some time to look over my questions.



Good to hear from u OilyPadawan, I sense the oil is strong with u. Fear not!...
Answered you above in BOLD. Hope it helps :)

 

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On 4/11/2017 at 2:58 PM, mateus560276 said:

Could you be a little more detailed about what would be dangerous in taking this supplement? From what I've seen, the side-effects are usually quite mild and reversible. There are men taking it for other health issues. If the problem is indeed hormonal, then shouldn't it be able to help?
You have to do your own research - I want to help everyone be more knowledgable about accutane, propecia(PFS) and saw palmetto but I have limited time.
Google the above in relation to sexual side effects!

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On 4/18/2017 at 2:50 AM, OilyOneCanobe said:


Good to hear from u OilyPadawan, I sense the oil is strong with u. Fear not!...
Answered you above in BOLD. Hope it helps :)

 

Haha, love the SW references. Also thank you for your helpful replies. By the way, have you tried a (large enough) dose of vitamin D3? Since taking Accutane, I've always avoided the sun, and I don't get much sunlight anyway in my area. I see that many people have seen some improvements from D3. I plan to take D3 + K2 for some time, hopefully with some nice results.
 

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6 hours ago, mateus560276 said:

Haha, love the SW references. Also thank you for your helpful replies. By the way, have you tried a (large enough) dose of vitamin D3? Since taking Accutane, I've always avoided the sun, and I don't get much sunlight anyway in my area. I see that many people have seen some improvements from D3. I plan to take D3 + K2 for some time, hopefully with some nice results.
 

I've tried 6000iu's a day of d3 for a few months, didn't see any change so stopped taking it.
My diet sucked at the time so no surprise that I got no results tbh, good luck with the d3+k2combo . just improve ur diet and stress as a priority.
 

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