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GLHF

Your opinion on that zinc?

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So I purchased http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B000KI6Z7O?keywords=zinc acne&qid=1446576101&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1 some months ago.. That's 50mg zinc.. I was dumb and I took 100mg ( 2 tablets a day ), my stomach hurt and I had bad breakout so I freaked out and stopped using 'em.. Now I've read some reviews on acne.org and I realized that I have to take only 50mg of zinc per day WITH FOOD.

So what's your opinion on http://www.amazon.co.uk/gp/product/B000KI6Z7O?keywords=zinc acne&qid=1446576101&ref_=sr_1_1&sr=8-1 zinc? Have you tried it? Is it good? 

I just took 50mg of zinc and b complex vitamin and I feel kind of weird?
I guess I won't take vitamin b complex anymore because that zinc already has Vitamin B6...

Edited by GLHF

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First, I'd like to say awesome picture.

Now the reason you felt the discomforting pains in your stomach upon taking dietary zinc is due to it's acidic nature and relatively slow dissipation rate.  On an empty stomach it feels like it tends to fester, but if it where to ever happen I would just chug back a good quantity of milk to neutralize the reaction.  However, milk contains calcium as well as trace amounts of dietary iron all of which has been observed to have a negative interaction with the trace mineral absorption.  Nevertheless, there is also evidence that dietary zinc absorption in the presence of calcium has a negligible decrease in biological availability.  Iron also has been established in some controlled experiments to inhibit zinc absorption.
So the inherent nature of trace mineral absorption is quite complicated to say the least.  Unlike our fat soluble and water soluble vitamins, dietary minerals and elements undergo a 3-part process.  1. Intraluminal stage 2. translocation stage 3. mobilization stage.  It's also using two different forms of membrane transportation.  Initially the general absorption of minerals once within the stomach is passive diffusion across the gradient meaning it requires no ATP hydrolysis to fuel the facilitation across the specified ion channel.  Now, later on it will eventually require active transportation that is dependent upon viable ATP.  (A little bit of biochemical footwork.... ATP+H2O=ADP + PO) The phosphate group (PO) is utilized by the membrane bound channel to facilitate transportation of the key nutrient across the phospholipid bilayer and into the cell.  This is only required when a transport isn't passive.
Taking the simplified little example of metabolic pathways and absorption that I provided, and then think about multiple trace minerals all relying on the exact same specified pathway!  This is where a competitive activity ensues and eventually one or two of the nutrients that were competing are subject to compartment displacement.  Basically in a nutshell the byproduct of having conflicting minerals simultaneously requesting the same membrane ion channel results in a diminished biological availability of relevant compounds.  All of this is occurring at the gastrointestinal columnal epithelium.
So it's wise to spread them all out over the course of the day.  Take some in the morning with breakfast.  Then take the rest that don't conflict later on during dinner!

Onto the water soluble B-Complex family!

You need the whole B-Complex family!!!!!!!  It's functionality is co-dependent upon each other and when they are adequately provided the synergistic interactions are maximized.  To keep it short and sweet the B-Complex family is involved with erythropoiesis, lipolysis, glycolysis, glycogenesis, Citric Acid Cycle. etc etc etc.  It's a fantastic vitamin family to take.  Just watch out for B12 as it's analogues can be dubious.  Oral B12 in the vitamer form cyanocobalamin is practically useless!  You need methylcobalamin and in large doses to get an adequate blood serum concentration in a realistic perspective.  Unless you don't mind giving yourself an intramuscular shot with hydroxocobalamin, then I'd opt for the oral methylation of cobalamin instead.  It isn't too hard to find.

Uhm yeah I think that's about it?  I'm sitting in class...

Edited by BaxterMcDoobinson

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First, I'd like to say awesome picture.

Now the reason you felt the discomforting pains in your stomach upon taking dietary zinc is due to it's acidic nature and relatively slow dissipation rate.  On an empty stomach it feels like it tends to fester, but if it where to ever happen I would just chug back a good quantity of milk to neutralize the reaction.  However, milk contains calcium as well as trace amounts of dietary iron all of which has been observed to have a negative interaction with the trace mineral absorption.  Nevertheless, there is also evidence that dietary zinc absorption in the presence of calcium has a negligible decrease in biological availability.  Iron also has been established in some controlled experiments to inhibit zinc absorption.
So the inherent nature of trace mineral absorption is quite complicated to say the least.  Unlike our fat soluble and water soluble vitamins, dietary minerals and elements undergo a 3-part process.  1. Intraluminal stage 2. translocation stage 3. mobilization stage.  It's also using two different forms of membrane transportation.  Initially the general absorption of minerals once within the stomach is passive diffusion across the gradient meaning it requires no ATP hydrolysis to fuel the facilitation across the specified ion channel.  Now, later on it will eventually require active transportation that is dependent upon viable ATP.  (A little bit of biochemical footwork.... ATP+H2O=ADP + PO) The phosphate group (PO) is utilized by the membrane bound channel to facilitate transportation of the key nutrient across the phospholipid bilayer and into the cell.  This is only required when a transport isn't passive.
Taking the simplified little example of metabolic pathways and absorption that I provided, and then think about multiple trace minerals all relying on the exact same specified pathway!  This is where a competitive activity ensues and eventually one or two of the nutrients that were competing are subject to compartment displacement.  Basically in a nutshell the byproduct of having conflicting minerals simultaneously requesting the same membrane ion channel results in a diminished biological availability of relevant compounds.  All of this is occurring at the gastrointestinal columnal epithelium.
So it's wise to spread them all out over the course of the day.  Take some in the morning with breakfast.  Then take the rest that don't conflict later on during dinner!

Onto the water soluble B-Complex family!

You need the whole B-Complex family!!!!!!!  It's functionality is co-dependent upon each other and when they are adequately provided the synergistic interactions are maximized.  To keep it short and sweet the B-Complex family is involved with erythropoiesis, lipolysis, glycolysis, glycogenesis, Citric Acid Cycle. etc etc etc.  It's a fantastic vitamin family to take.  Just watch out for B12 as it's analogues can be dubious.  Oral B12 in the vitamer form cyanocobalamin is practically useless!  You need methylcobalamin and in large doses to get an adequate blood serum concentration in a realistic perspective.  Unless you don't mind giving yourself an intramuscular shot with hydroxocobalamin, then I'd opt for the oral methylation of cobalamin instead.  It isn't too hard to find.

Uhm yeah I think that's about it?  I'm sitting in class...

WoW thanks for that reply, very informative.. BTW mine B Complex has B12 ^^ so yeaahh...

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First, I'd like to say awesome picture.

Now the reason you felt the discomforting pains in your stomach upon taking dietary zinc is due to it's acidic nature and relatively slow dissipation rate.  On an empty stomach it feels like it tends to fester, but if it where to ever happen I would just chug back a good quantity of milk to neutralize the reaction.  However, milk contains calcium as well as trace amounts of dietary iron all of which has been observed to have a negative interaction with the trace mineral absorption.  Nevertheless, there is also evidence that dietary zinc absorption in the presence of calcium has a negligible decrease in biological availability.  Iron also has been established in some controlled experiments to inhibit zinc absorption.
So the inherent nature of trace mineral absorption is quite complicated to say the least.  Unlike our fat soluble and water soluble vitamins, dietary minerals and elements undergo a 3-part process.  1. Intraluminal stage 2. translocation stage 3. mobilization stage.  It's also using two different forms of membrane transportation.  Initially the general absorption of minerals once within the stomach is passive diffusion across the gradient meaning it requires no ATP hydrolysis to fuel the facilitation across the specified ion channel.  Now, later on it will eventually require active transportation that is dependent upon viable ATP.  (A little bit of biochemical footwork.... ATP+H2O=ADP + PO) The phosphate group (PO) is utilized by the membrane bound channel to facilitate transportation of the key nutrient across the phospholipid bilayer and into the cell.  This is only required when a transport isn't passive.
Taking the simplified little example of metabolic pathways and absorption that I provided, and then think about multiple trace minerals all relying on the exact same specified pathway!  This is where a competitive activity ensues and eventually one or two of the nutrients that were competing are subject to compartment displacement.  Basically in a nutshell the byproduct of having conflicting minerals simultaneously requesting the same membrane ion channel results in a diminished biological availability of relevant compounds.  All of this is occurring at the gastrointestinal columnal epithelium.
So it's wise to spread them all out over the course of the day.  Take some in the morning with breakfast.  Then take the rest that don't conflict later on during dinner!

Onto the water soluble B-Complex family!

You need the whole B-Complex family!!!!!!!  It's functionality is co-dependent upon each other and when they are adequately provided the synergistic interactions are maximized.  To keep it short and sweet the B-Complex family is involved with erythropoiesis, lipolysis, glycolysis, glycogenesis, Citric Acid Cycle. etc etc etc.  It's a fantastic vitamin family to take.  Just watch out for B12 as it's analogues can be dubious.  Oral B12 in the vitamer form cyanocobalamin is practically useless!  You need methylcobalamin and in large doses to get an adequate blood serum concentration in a realistic perspective.  Unless you don't mind giving yourself an intramuscular shot with hydroxocobalamin, then I'd opt for the oral methylation of cobalamin instead.  It isn't too hard to find.

Uhm yeah I think that's about it?  I'm sitting in class...

So which vitamins should be taken together? I am currently taking:

1.2g of NAC (BulkSupplements), 300mg of Milk Thistle (Jarrow Formulas), 50mg of Zinc Picolinate (NOW), 200mg of Selenium (every other day), Cod Liver Oil (going to switch to Krill oil), Probiotics (Nature's Bounty) 5,000 IU of Vitamin D-3 (NOW, every other day). I will also be adding 500mg of time-release B5. I was taking a B-Complex, but stopped due to the B12 being made up of cyanocobalamin.

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I think vitamins and minerals in pill form is crap. It always needs something else to go with it, and I just think that food naturally has things in the correct ratios. Plus, I'm pretty sure a multivitamin cause a breakout where I never broke out. 

Edited by holdingontohope

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I wouldn't stop taking a B-Vitamin Complex solely on the basis that it contains the biologically inactive vitamer cyanocobalamin.  It just means that you are basically pissing out more of the micronutrient than your gastrointestinal tract absorbs, but the associated vitamin/vitamers in the complex can still prove useful.  Cobalamin is a weird vitamin due to intrinsic factors contributing to it's metabolism, along with the dosage consumed, and it's complimentary nutrients.  If you have a doctor and health insurance then I would get your B12 shots in the office during check up.  I administer my I.M injections on my own doing, but I've also been injecting a myriad of compounds into my body for quite sometime.

I wouldn't go too crazy with all the analytical nonsense unless you are someone who practices in the realm of sports nutrition or really demand a high output nutritional regime to adequately sustain your biological necessities.  Just be conscious about your food choices and practice moderation because even eating too healthy will create deleterious effects (mostly psychological in my opinion).

 

To Holdingontohope, it's virtually impossible to get a complete spectrum of nutrients in your daily diet for the average person.  Most people consume 2000 calories or less per day with the occasional binge session, but it only included starchy carbohydrates and processed fats.  A multi-vitamin is a supplementation to a well balanced diet, however it isn't a replacement for a poor diet.

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