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Green_Vegetable_Man

Would you drink a cup of pesticides?

"All your aquarium fish will die within a matter of minutes if you add tap water to your fish tank without also including a de-chlorinator to remove the chlorine. Doesn't that tell you something about the danger of drinking chlorine?"

I've kept plenty of fish without a dechlorinator. Mutant fish or shitty article?

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Whenever I see some outlandish claims, I always see that one mercola site as one of the only resources used to back up the claim. I don't really take much from that site into account these days.

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I love how everyone dismisses all the research listed to prove the point of the article. Chlorine is a synthetic man-made chemical. People add water filters to their home all the time to avoid it, plus the other chemicals in drinking water. This is a huge DUH.

The AP had an article that talked about how male fish are producing eggs in the Potomoc River....I guess that's a conspiracy theory too. Gee.....I wonder why THAT'S happening (could be all the chemicals in the water that mess with hormones.....YA THINK?) eusa_think.gifidea.gif

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Male Fish Producing Eggs in Potomac River

William Cocke

for National Geographic News

November 3, 2004

Something fishy is happening in the headwaters of the Potomac River. Scientists have discovered that some male bass are producing eggsâ€â€a decidedly female reproductive function.

In June 2002 reports appeared of fish die-offs in the South Branch of the Potomac River. The West Virginia Division of Natural Resources asked U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) scientists to examine fish health in the watershed near the town of Moorefield, about three hours' drive from Washington, D.C.

Anglers were also reporting fish with lesions. USGS scientists determined that some of the lesions indicated exposure to bacteria and other contaminants.

Read the full story >>

 

Smallmouth bass, like the one shown above, are one of many fish species whose males are demonstrating distinctly feminine behavior. Male smallmouth bass appear to be producing eggs in the Potomac River, near Washington, D.C. The condition may be caused by chemicals that increase the level of hormones in the water.

Photograph courtesy U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

   

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  The following year, the USGS conducted a more intensive assessment with a statistically significant number of fish, this time looking for internal damage. That's when they discovered a so-called intersex conditionâ€â€where one sex exhibits both testicular and ovarian tissue.

"It was not something we were really looking for," said Vicki Blazer, a fish pathologist with the USGS's Leetown Science Center in Kearneysville, West Virginia.

Some 42 percent of male smallmouth bass surveyed showed signs of intersex development. A second sampling this spring produced an even higher rateâ€â€79 percent showed sexual abnormalities.

Mysterious Sex Changes

The findings have perplexed the government scientists, who suspect a little-understood class of emerging contaminants. The contaminants include natural hormones excreted by humans and livestock as well as hormone-mimicking synthetic chemicals. The chemicals appear to confuse the endocrine systems of fish, essentially fooling males into producing female cells.

Endocrine disruptors work like biological disinformation campaigns. Sometimes mimicking natural hormones like estrogen, they alter other hormone concentrations. The disruptors can either prevent or weaken the normal cell-signaling process.

David O. Norris, a professor in the University of Colorado's Department of Integrative Physiology, has specialized in environmental endocrinology for over 35 years. He is leading an ongoing research project looking into hormone pollution in three rivers in the Denver area.

"We're looking at the fish above and below where sewage treatment plant effluents are being added into the rivers," he said. "The best data we have are on Boulder Creek in terms of numbers of individuals. In all three cases we found reproductive abnormalities in fish downstream from where the effluent is."

Norris is focusing on white suckers, a species of fish not known for exhibiting intersex characteristics under normal conditions.

"Our impression is that they are males that are being feminized [because] of the nature of the chemicals that are in the water, and most of them are estrogenic [meaning they stimulate development of female sex characteristics]," he said. "Some of [the estrogenic chemicals] are natural urinary estrogenic products from humans, and some of them are pharmaceuticalsâ€â€birth control pills."

Norris has also found large concentrations of compounds called alkylphenolsâ€â€common substances often associated with household detergents and personal-care products.

"They're the same sort of compounds that have been associated with fishes in England and Europe," he said. "The main difference here is the source is domestic sewage, as opposed to industrial sewage. This is one of the first observations, certainly in the U.S., of a domestic sewage factor alone being connected with this [intersex phenomenon]."

Indicator Species and Water Quality

As for the South Branch of the Potomac River, Norris, like the USGS team, is unsure of the source of the pollution. "It's hard to say what the specific source might be [in the South Branch]. But I think the effect is very clear, that they're getting feminization," he said.

Currently USGS scientist Blazer said, the focus has shifted to analyzing water-quality data. "The water resources division of USGS out of Charleston put what are called passive samplers at a number of the sites," she said. "Basically they accumulate contaminants what fish tissue would accumulate over time. They expect to have the analyses of those back in November. We're hoping with that and some of the other water-quality things we're doing, we'll at least begin to get an idea of what we should be looking at."

Blazer added that her team would soon be conducting its fall collection, adding largemouth bass to the mix to test against a nationwide USGS largemouth-monitoring database. "Are we seeing the same thing in largemouth bass, or is there something about smallmouth, whether it's their food habits or when they spawn, that makes them more susceptible to exposure," she said.

Blazer said fish are good indicators of subtle changes in water qualityâ€â€changes perhaps caused by the introduction of natural and synthetic hormones. Still, the exact cause of the sex-changed South Branch smallmouths remains unclear.

"Hopefully, when we get our data back, we can all sit down and really look at it and come up with some thoughts," she said.

Don't Miss a Discovery

Sign up for the free Inside National Geographic newsletter. Every two weeks we'll send you our top news stories by e-mail.

For more animal-irregularity stories, scroll to bottom. 

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I've given it a chance tons of times; but alt-health sites just are run by people who make their life goal to break down old ideas with or without reason. They're the Stephen Greenblatts of the health world (except that Greenblatt is a genius).

PS: Nice job picking off where MelbourneBloke left off, Deni.

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Actually, Benny, reading comprehension skills are great. All one has to do is read the research data and draw the logical conclusion. Synthetic chemicals cannot be assimilated and broken down by the human body; they are estrogenic in nature and mess with the natural processes. Male fish don't produce eggs, or can't you read for comprehension too?

Facts are pesky things, I know, I know....pesky, pesky, pesky....

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Tracy: Good. biggrin.gif We all gotta get our hustle on and work hard where the opportunity presents itself. That's the bottom line for me.

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I hear ya. Good for you. What are you pursuing? I just got a great gig working for Overnite Transportation doing customer service work out of my home. They will forward calls to my house. I will work part-time, and pay off some debts (pay is great). I'm thinking seriously about going to school for web design so I can have my own website and do some writing and whatnot.

My husband is out your way right now as we speak. He's a corporate trainer for Overnite and is at the L.A. Terminal right now doing training, and is doing some hiring too. He's been at Overnite for 17 years. I worked there as a temp years ago...that's how we met.

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Guest Tracy

Psychology. I'm aiming towards a masters so I can be an MFCC someday. It's a lot of work, though....it's tough to raise the boys and work full time plus go to school part time at night.

The great thing about psychology is that you don't have to be a young, go-getter to get a degree in it, since people equate wisdom with age, graying hair, etc. So it's a great career choice for the 'mature' woman! razz.gif

God's got my back, too....cause I just got approved for a Cal Grant....which I was never eligible for before (always made just a tad too much money).....so I'm really happy about that. biggrin.gif

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Deni: "Some of [the estrogenic chemicals] are natural urinary estrogenic products from humans, and some of them are pharmaceuticalsâ€â€birth control pills."

If I took birth control pills, I'd probably grow breasts, too. I don't see what that has to do with chlorine.

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exactly what i was thinking ben! it was mainly talking about natural hormones that came from excrement (both human and animal) and synthetic hormones. chlorine is not a hormone...

anyhoo, i think there are plenty of men out there that could benefit from being a bit more feminine badgrin.gif the world would probably be a safer place...

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I still just love that Denise was able to turn in "the dangers of chlorine" into "Here's what happens when animals take birth control pills!"

Nice one.

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Uh, no. You, Benny, are always on the "no synthetic chemicals are ever dangerous under any circumstance never ever" crowd, and I showed you that you were wrong because male fish are producing eggs (you know...something female fish do). I brought it up as a point because of the ridiculous stands you consistantly take. I think that sometimes you take a position just because it's opposite of what others think. I honestly believe that. Besides, breast cancner is linked to too much estrogenic activity in the body. Ever heard of "cancer clusters" and what their causes are? (Hint, hint.....mostly chemicals being dumped in drinking water.)

As I said before, you never ever never ever deal with the research facts that are stated, as usual. The article listed studies done and their results.

If you want to believe that no chemicals ever harm anyone, no skin off my back. You can believe whatever you want.

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Haha, I read while reading that, Deni. Thanks.

Your article doesn't say "Chlorine in water causes male fish to produce eggs." It blames it on animals consuming the birth control pills dumped. I'm not an idiot -- I know estrogen ingestion can cause some crazy effects...

But it has NOTHING to do with chlorine being dangerous in drinking water.

Go plagiarize something else.

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