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monster625

Does Protein Cause Acne Breakout?

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i ate chicken couple time of the week. Didn't really noticed acne breakout. My question is does chicken or protein in general cause acne? I want to start building some muscle and to do that i need to eat lots of chicken.

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I've never heard of protein causing acne, except from misinformed people who tell you to eat raw meat or something. Most chicken is given antibiotics and growth hormones, which is not good, but that is getting too strict(we have to eat something, and no food is perfect). I eat farm raised chicken every day, and it doesn't break me out, and I don't think it will break out others.

Another source of protein I get is pea protein shakes. They are allergen free, and a convenient way to add some more protein to your diet. It doesn't have to be pea protein - they make rice protein, egg protein, hemp protein, etc. Those protein shakes probably won't break people out, while whey protein might, and gainer shakes definitely can.

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Lean meats like chicken probably won't do much to you, considering it's lean chicken breast and not bbq chicken bought from stores for example.. If you're drinking a lot of milk for a protein source you MAY get breakouts, same with cheese and dairy in general. It doesn't break me out specifically but it seems to give many other people problems. Eggs are also a great protein source, unless you have troubles with iodine c:

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Protein in general is very important and doesn't cause acne. It's possible that you could be allergic to certain types of protein though. I also react to chicken. I haven't yet tried organic chicken, but I plan to as I continue to heal with this Paleo diet thing I'm doing. I'm thinking it could be the many toxins that exist in non-organic chickens that are affecting me, not the chicken itself.

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Ive recently read that eating a lot of protein in one sitting can raise insulin levels, even more than the insulin release from carbohydrates.

There was a study on this a long time ago and theres an article about it here http://www.marksdailyapple.com/insulin-index/#axzz27gu2hMD8

Basically its saying that while protein raises insulin levels more than carbs do, it also causes a release of glucagon to counteract the insulin (unlike carbs which elicit an insulin response only)

But the way I see it is that if insulin levels are being raised, then all the androgens and IGF that come with high insulin levels are still gonna happen? And its still going to cause acne the same way too many carbs do?

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i ate chicken couple time of the week. Didn't really noticed acne breakout. My question is does chicken or protein in general cause acne? I want to start building some muscle and to do that i need to eat lots of chicken.

No it doesn't. No research to suggest that.

Ive recently read that eating a lot of protein in one sitting can raise insulin levels, even more than the insulin release from carbohydrates.

There was a study on this a long time ago and theres an article about it here http://www.marksdail.../#axzz27gu2hMD8

Basically its saying that while protein raises insulin levels more than carbs do, it also causes a release of glucagon to counteract the insulin (unlike carbs which elicit an insulin response only)

But the way I see it is that if insulin levels are being raised, then all the androgens and IGF that come with high insulin levels are still gonna happen? And its still going to cause acne the same way too many carbs do?

I can't access that link for some reason.

Does that study comment on GI or GI load.

Typically protein is consumed with fats that will slow the rate of absorption down which means the insulin response is less.

The amount consumed in one sitting may increase insulin, more food, more to break down but unless it spikes insulin like fast acting carbs would then there is no danger of disrupting hormonal balance.

Edited by TakeToTheSkies

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i ate chicken couple time of the week. Didn't really noticed acne breakout. My question is does chicken or protein in general cause acne? I want to start building some muscle and to do that i need to eat lots of chicken.

No it doesn't. No research to suggest that.

Ive recently read that eating a lot of protein in one sitting can raise insulin levels, even more than the insulin release from carbohydrates.

There was a study on this a long time ago and theres an article about it here http://www.marksdail.../#axzz27gu2hMD8

Basically its saying that while protein raises insulin levels more than carbs do, it also causes a release of glucagon to counteract the insulin (unlike carbs which elicit an insulin response only)

But the way I see it is that if insulin levels are being raised, then all the androgens and IGF that come with high insulin levels are still gonna happen? And its still going to cause acne the same way too many carbs do?

The amount consumed in one sitting may increase insulin, more food, more to break down but unless it spikes insulin like fast acting carbs would then there is no danger of disrupting hormonal balance.

The study suggests that protein does spike insulin the same way fast acting carbs does, although through a different process. Carbs raise blood sugar levels which cause an insulin response, whereas protein causes an insulin response so that the body can process amino acids efficiently.

Heres the link to the actual study itself - http://ajcn.nutrition.org/content/66/5/1264.full.pdf+html?maxtoshow=&HITS=10&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&author1=holt&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT

And the related article in full

Reader Pete asked for some thoughts on the “Insulin Index' date='” a measurement chart similar to the glycemic index. While [b']the glycemic index calculates the relative blood sugar rise induced by given foods, the insulin index evaluates the insulin response generated by 38 different foods.

The insulin index, which first made its appearance in a 1997 American Journal of Clinical Nutrition article, was primarily the creation of Susanne Holt, a graduate student at the time and now a doctor. Interestingly, Holt, her supervisory co-authors, or other researchers haven’t chosen to conduct further research to update the “preliminary” results of their insulin index study since its creation eleven years ago now.

While Holt and her co-authors found a high correlation between glycemic index and insulin index measurements, they stumbled upon an intriguing exception. High protein, virtually no-carb foods like meat and eggs, while low on the glycemic index, measured high on the insulin index. In other words, while the meat and eggs didn’t cause a spike in blood sugar the way most carbohydrates do, they did result in an unexpectedly significant rise in insulin. (Baked goods, with their high levels of refined carbs, elicited a very high rise in insulin as well. Of course, this comes as less of a surprise.)

Obviously, the index has some eyebrow-raising potential, especially in those of us who choose a high protein diet. But there’s more to the story here. First off, let’s remember that the protein-rich foods didn’t result in the physical stress of blood sugar spikes. But what about that rise in insulin? Why? Should I be concerned about that omelet I ate for breakfast?

Insulin, in and of itself, is a good and necessary thing. It promotes the storage of nutrients after all. In our natural, primal state, this was an essential process. Even in our modern lives, this storage process is still vital. (We just have a nasty habit of flooding the system these days.) In the case of high protein foods, it makes perfect sense that the body recognizes the need to store amino acids. (Primal life wasn’t a perfect set schedule of three square meals a day after all.)

The insulin helps drive amino acids into the muscle cells where they’re needed. At the heart of this process, one thing is for certain: the body knows what it’s doing.

But there’s another dimension to the protein-insulin issue. When we eat protein-rich food, another chemical is released by the body that actually has a contrary effect to insulin. Protein-rich foods also result in a release of glucagon. (Carb-rich food does not.) Glucagon raises blood sugar levels in part to allow for absorption of amino acids in the liver and their subsequent transformation there to glucose. In our evolution, we developed the capacity to make what we required out of what was available. If dinner was going to be part of a mammoth carcass, then the body could enjoy the protein it needed and use insulin response to store essential amino acids. Simultaneously, it had the glucagon to keep blood sugar stable in the absence of carb-based foods.

What does this tell us? It underscores the fact that we don’t need to (and shouldn’t) include extra carbohydrates in our diet. The carbs we get from vegetables and the glucose that can be made even from protein-based foods offer plenty of the right fuels our bodies need.

For people without diabetes, the insulin and glucagon responses mitigate each other, and we’re looking at a healthy picture. For people with diabetes or impaired insulin response, however, this picture is much different. In diabetics, this crucial equilibrium is damaged. The body not only has difficulty compensating for blood sugar spikes from carb intake, it’s also at a disadvantage when it comes to low-carb, protein-based meals with the lack of insulin-glucagon balance. (Another reason to avoid developing diabetes from the outset.) Nonetheless, diabetics fare better with a low-carb diet.

In short, while the insulin index raises some intriguing points, I don’t think it undermines the Primal Blueprint or unravels existence as we know it. It’s another bit of research that illuminates the natural interaction of our body’s systems with the diet we feed it. The index highlights the need for responsible food choices based on our inherent physiological functioning.

Now, pass the bacon.

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Protein in general is very important and doesn't cause acne. It's possible that you could be allergic to certain types of protein though. I also react to chicken. I haven't yet tried organic chicken, but I plan to as I continue to heal with this Paleo diet thing I'm doing. I'm thinking it could be the many toxins that exist in non-organic chickens that are affecting me, not the chicken itself.

Do you eat skinless chicken only?

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It is not uncommon to be allergic to chicken, especially grain fed CAFO factory farmed chicken.

Certain amino acids stimulate insulin. They are high in dairy products in order to stimulate the growth in the baby animal, but I don't think they are high in chicken.

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I've been wondering whether I eat too much protein. Does anyone limit the amount of protein based on their body weight? According to Mark's Daily Apple I would be over-consuming protein for my body mass. I've always done this and always been slim so it's not like the extra protein is helping me put on weight, but maybe it could be making the insulin resistance worse? If that's the case I would need to decrease protein/increase the fat.

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i ate chicken couple time of the week. Didn't really noticed acne breakout. My question is does chicken or protein in general cause acne? I want to start building some muscle and to do that i need to eat lots of chicken.

high levels of protien or amounts that go above you recommended amount trigger the growth hormone IGF-1 which can effect acne. http://www.acne.org/messageboard/index.php/topic/321191-intermittent-fasting-you-really-need-to-try-this/page__pid__3291183#entry3291183

i go into alot more detail on this link

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I've been wondering whether I eat too much protein. Does anyone limit the amount of protein based on their body weight? According to Mark's Daily Apple I would be over-consuming protein for my body mass. I've always done this and always been slim so it's not like the extra protein is helping me put on weight, but maybe it could be making the insulin resistance worse? If that's the case I would need to decrease protein/increase the fat.

Unless you have some sort of metabolic condition you won't become insulin resistance by consuming too much protein.

The daily recommend thing is too generic. Who is to say what level of protein you require for your body? Some douche in an article has " recommended" it. Some who has never met you or know your medical history.

Like any food, eat too much of of it your body will start to store fat after it's glycogen stores have been replenished. You get an over spill effect and the excess is stored. However to do with this protein alone would take a huge amount as the bodies first source of energy is carbohydrate. Deprive the body of carbs then it eats into the glycogen stores and the fat stores to make up that energy. In short highly unlikely of gaining weight eating too much protein. That is assuming of course you are not eating an excessive amounts of carbs.

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Unless you have some sort of metabolic condition you won't become insulin resistance by consuming too much protein.

The daily recommend thing is too generic. Who is to say what level of protein you require for your body? Some douche in an article has " recommended" it. Some who has never met you or know your medical history.

Like any food, eat too much of of it your body will start to store fat after it's glycogen stores have been replenished. You get an over spill effect and the excess is stored. However to do with this protein alone would take a huge amount as the bodies first source of energy is carbohydrate. Deprive the body of carbs then it eats into the glycogen stores and the fat stores to make up that energy. In short highly unlikely of gaining weight eating too much protein. That is assuming of course you are not eating an excessive amounts of carbs.

Hiya, thanks for replying

I most likely do have a metabolic disorder. I have a polyfollicular ovary which is a common sign of PCOS, a metabolic disorder. I can eat more than any of the men I know and all of them are taller and at least 3/4 stone heavier than me. Always been that way since I was young. A lot of women with pcos clear up on paleo so I'm trying to get my fat up and reduce the carb/protein a bit. My diet probably is a bit unbalanced in favour of protein and carbs so I'm hoping that extra fat may help increase my estrogen levels and help me put on a bit of weight.

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Unless you have some sort of metabolic condition you won't become insulin resistance by consuming too much protein.

The daily recommend thing is too generic. Who is to say what level of protein you require for your body? Some douche in an article has " recommended" it. Some who has never met you or know your medical history.

Like any food, eat too much of of it your body will start to store fat after it's glycogen stores have been replenished. You get an over spill effect and the excess is stored. However to do with this protein alone would take a huge amount as the bodies first source of energy is carbohydrate. Deprive the body of carbs then it eats into the glycogen stores and the fat stores to make up that energy. In short highly unlikely of gaining weight eating too much protein. That is assuming of course you are not eating an excessive amounts of carbs.

Hiya, thanks for replying

I most likely do have a metabolic disorder. I have a polyfollicular ovary which is a common sign of PCOS, a metabolic disorder. I can eat more than any of the men I know and all of them are taller and at least 3/4 stone heavier than me. Always been that way since I was young. A lot of women with pcos clear up on paleo so I'm trying to get my fat up and reduce the carb/protein a bit. My diet probably is a bit unbalanced in favour of protein and carbs so I'm hoping that extra fat may help increase my estrogen levels and help me put on a bit of weight.

There are lot of variables there. If a lot of people clear up on certain diet does not make it so for everyone. Your biology is unique to you which means your nutrition should be unique to you.

Also your body type may have something to do with it. For example i am an endomorph and i store fat very easily. The other end of the spectrum is ectomorph. This body type finds it very hard to gain weight. You sound like you have the characteristics of an ectomorph.

Increasing fats is easier than you might think. Eating eggs, nuts, olive oil, udos oil, full fat greek yogurt, flaxseed, steak. All these are easy to put into a diet, but again it is what works for you.

My current ratio is 40% protein 40% fats and 20% carbs. It works for me but i wouldn't say that would work for everyone going on body types.

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