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Bee venom (Apitoxin), contains at least 18 active substances. Mellitin, the most prevalent substance, is one of the most potent anti-inflammatory agents known (100 times more potent than hydrocortisol). Adolapin is another strong anti-inflammatory substance and inhibits cyclooxygenase; it thus has analgesic activity as well. Apamin inhibits complement C3 activity and blocks calcium-dependent potassium channels, thus enhancing nerve transmission. Other substances such as Compound X, Hyaluronidase, Phospholipase A2, Histamine, and Mast Cell Degranulating Protein (MCDP) are involved in the inflammatory response of venom, with the softening of tissue and the facilitation of fluid flow. Finally, there are measurable amounts of the neurotransmitters Dopamine, Norepinephrine, and Seratonin.

Bee venom therapy can be useful in a wide variety of medical situations. Charles Mraz, a beekeeper in Middlebury, Vermont who has popularized bee venom therapy for the past 60 years, says that it is reasonable to try bee venom therapy in any clinical setting, especially where nothing else seems to work. However, there are four situations which are most often indicated:

Arthritis and other systemic inflammations. Bee venom therapy can be useful in both rheumatoid and osteoarthritis, helping both pain and swelling. In the case of rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid nodules can lessen in size. Other connective tissue diseases such as scleroderma have been (anecdotally) helped by bee venom therapy. Even systemic inflammations not related to joints, such as ulcerative colitis or even asthma, may warrant a trial of bee venom. A possible mechanism of action is due to the stimulation of endogenous cortisol through the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis.

Acute and chronic injuries. Bursitis, tendonitis and other areas of injury respond well to bee venom therapy. Local anti-inflammatory effects, and the immune responses to a foreign protein might be involved here. Chronic back and neck pain will respond, as will other aches and pains.

Scar tissue. Keloids and other scar tissue are broken down and softened by the hyaluronidase and other substances in the bee venom. These often respond by flattening out and fading in color. Internal scar tissue, such as adhesions from previous surgery, may respond to treatment over the area.Multiple Sclerosis. This use of bee venom is poorly understood, and needs to be studied further. Recently, the Multiple Sclerosis (MS) Association of America awarded a grant to an immunologist Dr. John Santilli to prepare the venom in extract form to study its effect on MS patients. Hundreds of patients with MS currently seek out bee venom therapists and beekeepers. The treatment is prolonged and not for the squeamish, but the common responses are increased stability, less fatigue, and less spasm.

Bee venom therapy can be performed by a beekeeper, or by a patient or partner who is taught to use the bees. After cooling the jar containing the bee to retard its movement, a bee is removed with tweezers, and held over an area of the body, which it then stings.

The number, sites, and frequency of the stings depend on the patient and the problem. A simple tendonitis might just take a few stings, perhaps 2 or 3 at a session for 2 to 5 sessions. A more chronic problem like arthritis can take 2 to 3 times per week, several stings at a time, for 1 to 3 months. Multiple sclerosis takes months to respond, though sometimes patients feel more energetic after a few treatments. MS patients who use bee venom insist that one must keep it up 2 to 3 times per week for six months in order to give it a full trial.

There are physicians around who use bee venom therapy in their practices. This is done by obtaining the venom in an injectible, sterile form and injecting it under the skin, sometimes mixed with a local anesthetic. Some say that collecting the venom in vials loses some of its potency, but in many situations this is more realistic than finding a beekeeper or handling bees in a medical office.

Edited by Maldition
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I have my doubts whether this would work with pitted acne scars. It dissolves scar tissue, but is there any guarantee that there will be new collagen formation when the scar tissue is dissolved? If not, you could end up with a worse looking scar.

I thought of this a couple of years ago and posted, there wasn't much interest either, as you can see no has replied yet here. I did catch a bee and tried to get it to sting me on a scar on my forehead but it just wouldn't, so I just let it go moved on to try other things.

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An ACE inhibitor would allow the skin to heal properly once the venom dissolved the scar tissue. I believe the reason this isn't a more popular treatment is purely because of its scarcity. No one can get hold of bee venom, at least I don't know how to. Also no one really knows anything about it.

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I have my doubts whether this would work with pitted acne scars. It dissolves scar tissue, but is there any guarantee that there will be new collagen formation when the scar tissue is dissolved? If not, you could end up with a worse looking scar.

I thought of this a couple of years ago and posted, there wasn't much interest either, as you can see no has replied yet here. I did catch a bee and tried to get it to sting me on a scar on my forehead but it just wouldn't, so I just let it go moved on to try other things.

If disuelves the scar, then the skin look good always.

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An ACE inhibitor would allow the skin to heal properly once the venom dissolved the scar tissue. I believe the reason this isn't a more popular treatment is purely because of its scarcity. No one can get hold of bee venom, at least I don't know how to. Also no one really knows anything about it.

Absolutely, excellent combination.

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If you have seen the photo of the scar of the hand, practically has diluted the scar a single bee, is the result more important that i have seen, if the photo real without tricks, and this is something that should be taken into account, by the way the venom of bees comes in direct blisters to inject. The naturist centers of cosmetology and acupuncture carried out these treatments.

Edited by Maldition
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Api Therapy: Health Benefits

There have been few controlled scientific studies proving the value of bee venom, bee pollen, raw honey, royal jelly, or propolis, but there are many anecdotal reports about their health benefits. (One difficulty with controlled studies of bee venom is that a proper placebo is impossible to create; if you're stung by a bee, you know it.)

Because of its anti-inflammatory properties, bee venom is commonly used to treat diseases such as arthritis, bursitis, and tendinitis. It is also used to relieve chronic back and neck pain. Some apitherapists report that bee venom can also help break down and soften scar tissue, flattening scars and lightening them. This idea is supported by the fact that bee venom contains powerful enzymes that can break through scar tissue.

Bee venom therapy is additionally reported to decrease spasms and fatigue in multiple sclerosis patients and to increase the patients' stability. The National Multiple Sclerosis Association funded research at Allegheny University in Philadelphia to explore the possible benefits of apitherapy. The preliminary results of experiments conducted with laboratory mice, reported in 1998, found no beneficial effect against the course of an MS-like disease. Research is ongoing, however.

ApiTherapy: How To Choose a Practitioner

There are no licensing or credentialing organizations for apitherapists (apitherapy practitioners). Some physicians perform bee venom therapy themselves; others work with beekeepers who provide the bees and administer the stings under supervision. As in any type of treatment, getting a referral from a trusted health-care practitioner, friend, or relative is the best way to find an apitherapist.

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Apitoxin = bee venom.

You can have it prescribed from a doctor.

Products with that ingredient are used to treat allergic persons.

Edited by Mr.Don
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OK you can buy bee venom balm or ointment if anyone wants to try it.

Like I mentioned earlier my main concern is that this dissolves scar tissue and there's no guarantee new collagen formation will occur. Just like the stupid Serrapeptase, which also works by dissolving scar tissue and made my scars worse 'cause there was no new collagen formation.

This would work great if the scar is the result of excessive collagen, but pitted scars are the result of collagen loss.

The main component of bee venom is Melittin, which induces the production of cortisol, which in turn induces collagen loss.

So should we just discard this as a pitted scar treatment and move on to something else?

(I think yes)

Edited by tj101
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OK you can buy bee venom balm or ointment if anyone wants to try it.

Like I mentioned earlier my main concern is that this dissolves scar tissue and there's no guarantee new collagen formation will occur. Just like the stupid Serrapeptase, which also works by dissolving scar tissue and made my scars worse 'cause there was no new collagen formation.

This would work great if the scar is the result of excessive collagen, but pitted scars are the result of collagen loss.

The main component of bee venom is Melittin, which induces the production of cortisol, which in turn induces collagen loss.

So should we just discard this as a pitted scar treatment and move on to something else?

(I think yes)

The best treatment that i have seen for the pitted scars are the pictures with the topiramate, and the topiramate reduces the collagen (reduce collagen like Enalapril ) ,by blocking channels of calcium, so your theory is not correct.

The dilute of collagen (like topiramate or enalapril ), also favor the pitted scars, making the skin can grow properly.

the only difference is that only have pics whit topiramate on acne scars , and not whit enalapril.

look acne scars whit a treatment whit topiramate:

before: http://dermatology.cdlib.org/95/original/scars/1A.jpg

after: http://dermatology.cdlib.org/95/original/scars/1B.jpg

Edited by Maldition
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