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belbie0606

Tip to avoid a super greasy face

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Hey guys! So I've noticed a lot of threads about blotting papers and make up that absorbs facial oils. Us acne-prone skinned people can get very greasy throughout the day... not very attractive. Not to mention, during the summer time (i.e. RIGHT NOW), my sunglasses keep sliding off my nose because I tend to grease up in my t-zone.

I've heard and researched on some things we should keep in mind when trying to use these products that reduce greasiness on our face. First, don't use too much blotting paper or powder! I know it's tempting, but by getting rid of too much of our oils on our face, we're actually encouraging our skin to produce more oil, because it's trying to compensate for the essential oil you stripped off of your face. So use these products in moderation. I personally don't use blotting paper or powder. I just get a tissue and blot off my facial oil throughout the day. It's not the most effective method, but that way I know I'm not drying out or dehydrating my skin.

Also, sometimes you may think your skin is oily, but it may be the moisturizer or sunscreen you are using that makes your face look shiny. So you should probably choose a more mattifying or light moisturizer/sunscreen. There are products out there that are oil-free and/or contain some powder in it that absorbs some of your facial oil.

I should note: I am in no way an expert in skin care. So if you have your doubts about what I'm saying, please feel free to correct me or express your opinion/experience. Or just do your own research!

And one more thing. I have yet to find a good mattifying sunscreen. I'm not particularly picky about the products in it, as long as its non-comedogenic. I have heard about the DermaDOCTOR Ain't Misbehavin' sunscreen. Has anyone tried this?

Thanks guys! I would really appreciate your input

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I think you are right about moisturizers and products we use on our faces. I find that if I use moisturizer in the morning, I'm going to be more oily in the afternoon. I think especially in the summer, using it every other day is OK. Also, I find that using some Vaseline or something like Aquaphor, just dabbing it on problem areas really helps me.

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I disagree about the blotting paper, because I read that it's a myth that blotting papers make the skin more oily. Our oil glands sit way too deep in our skin to be affected by blotting. Blotting paper is better than latex because it is gentler on the skin or something, that's what i read. Anyway I've been blotting for ages, not daily, but when I'm out at night or something, and I don't see my skin getting oiler. I also blot with tissue and it doesnt' work as well as blotting paper, my skin is still the same.

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I agree that blotting paper does not affect our skin negatively, and it doesn't make the skin produce as much oil. Yes, when we get rid of the oil on our skin our skin will make up for it, but not in higher quantities. However, washing your face multiple times throughout the day will make your face an oil slick. I wouldn't apply powder over oily skin either, because if you think about it you are actually creating a "mud" like consistency on your skin when you apply mattifying powder over oil. I definitely recommend blotting (with the blotting paper or a tissue) and then reapplying powder.

I definitely agree with sunscreen/moisturizer being the culprit. As some ingredients do cause the skin to produce more oil. I recommend using Olay moisturizer/sunscreen in one, it's noncomedegenic and dermatologists recommend it for acne-prone skin. You could also use Dermalogica Clean Start Welcome Matte, it keeps the skin looking fresh throughout the day and has SPF 15.

Edited by Maria V
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thanks for the replies, WalkTheWire, pchic, and Maria V. These responses are really helpful. I'm not quite as hesitant to using blotting paper anymore! I'll look into those sunscreens. I need to find one that also doesn't clump up when I put on top of benzoyl peroxide, and keeps my face from being gross nd shiny

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Very oily skin is almost always caused from your skin care. Most of the cleansers on the market strip the skin of its natural oils, causing your skin to "freak" and start trying to compensate. The other "Myth" is that oil-free is better for acne/oily skin. This is also not true. Hazelnut and jojoba oils for example are very good for oily/acne prone skin. Hazelnut oil is astringent on acne/oily skin and can actually help with oil throughout the day (when it is included in a moisturizer not straight on the face) and jojoba is very close to the skins natural sebum so it is readily accepted. The problem with oil-free brands is almost all of them use dimethicone (silicones) as their humectant, this puts a seal over the skin not allowing it to breathe and can cause major breakouts, they also use propelyne glycol as a moisturizer/lubricant, this ingredient is used as a lubricating agent in break fluid for you car and can also cause breakouts. If you don't understand the ingredient it is likely bad for your skin. Also vaselin would never be a good choice for the skin as the main ingredient is Mineral Oil. Mineral oil is a by-product of the gasoline industry (aka petroleum jelly) and like dimethicone does not let the skin breathe and will break you out, it doesn't penetrate the skin so it does not moisturize. You can make your own cleanser and moisturizer at home it's not that hard. Then see if you are still getting really oily, I bet it helps. You can cleanse your skin with............1tbl of kaolin clay (or basic wheat flour), 1 tbl of honey and add water to make a paste. Wash your skin with this, it is all you need, if you have makeup on remove it with jojoba oil first. For a moisturizer you can mix a drop of jojoba and a bit of aloe vera juice (from a health food store in the drink section, not the green goop, it has to be natural and only contain aloe) you could also just use a piece of aloe plant. This should help with the oil.

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I don't see how anyone could think blotting paper would make the skin produce more oil. It's removing oil from the surface, how would the skin "know" oil has been removed from its surface in order to produce more oil? I think it's a little controversial that the skin is even capable of knowing when the pores/follicles themselves have been cleansed of oil and then replaces it. Wouldn't there have to be some nerves serving the particular function of detecting pressure on the inside of the pore/follicle or something? I've never heard specifics, just the vague idea.

I love blotting paper. I found some rice paper blotting papers at Sally's beauty supply that has some matte translucent powder on one side. I like them a lot.

I have tried a high-end oil reducer lotion by sanitas but it didn't work for me, so I don't really suggest products that are supposed to reduce oil production, unless someone were to provide me with information about the specific mechanisms of action.

I would say try not to STRIP the skin of oil. an oil film helps reduce the evaporation of water from the skin, and I would think intermittent periods of no oil could lead to dehydration and damaged skin. Instead, remove EXCESS oil as needed throughout the day.

Edited by postfetalphase
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postfetalphase - that's true, i hadn't really thought of that. i don't know, i just found some research that said that blotting paper should be used in moderation, and i trusted it! haha so i guess its a good thing i'm hearing all of your guys' opinions.

im liking the sally's beauty supply oil blotting sheets idea. clever to put the mattifying powder on the other side. i DEFINITELY will pick one of those up!

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postfetalphase - that's true, i hadn't really thought of that. i don't know, i just found some research that said that blotting paper should be used in moderation, and i trusted it! haha so i guess its a good thing i'm hearing all of your guys' opinions.

im liking the sally's beauty supply oil blotting sheets idea. clever to put the mattifying powder on the other side. i DEFINITELY will pick one of those up!

Yeah, the powder comes in like 4 different shades, including the translucent which is what i picked up. good stuff. 3.99 for like 50 sheets or something, i think

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I'm not sure why this happens, and I don't claim it does for everyone, but when I blot my face too much it seems to get oilier faster after that. I try to do it only once and I apply my makeup in a way that it'll look matte for longer.

Not sure if this has been mentioned on here, but imo, do not add powder to your face after your first application! It starts to make your makeup look more cakey and the oil just become worse and worse the more you add - this is what I've noticed for myself anyway. Blotting is definitely the way to go but I still try to keep that to a minimum.

The thing that helps me most is trying to keep my makeup as light as possible and layer or conceal only where I really need it rather than my whole face. The lighter the foundation and powder (which doesn't necessarily mean light coverage - you can still acquire full coverage) the longer my face will go without looking greasy.

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Ok actually I do find that the oil comes back fast when I blot. But then again maybe because blotting paper removes the oil more effeciently than let's say a tissue paper, so maybe I'm more sensitive when my skin transitions from relatively oil-free to being oily again? Compared to using tissue paper, the transition from having a thin film of oil on the skin to lots of oil feels less significant? Lol that's my little theory.

I do notice that the oil returning is not more than usual, when I use blotting paper.

To be safe, just use rice paper for blotting paper, and not those awful powdered blotting paper which will not be good for the skin! And yea I agree do not powder over oily skin, try to remove the oil first before touching up.

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Haha, I actually use tissue or toilet paper. Not because I feel it works better, I just don't find the blotting papers I've used worked any better than tissues - and I can use the tissue more than once.

I don't think blotting paper or blotting in general necessarily cause more oil for me.I just think that nothing is going to completely remove the oil from one's face in the first place. (Why would anyone want that though? Skin would just look too dry and chalky. A little oil is good, imo - it's what keeps makeup looking more natural, if you ask me.) Like I was saying, I don't think the oil comes back worse then before, I think it's just that more has accumulated. Not sure how to explain this...

Let's stay, on a scale of 0-10 we start at a 0 when we put makeup on or start our day w/o makeup on. By noon it's at a 4 or 5, we use blotting papers or w/e else and it goes down to a 2-3. It won't take as long for your skin to appear oily again, in the same amount of time it might go to a 7+. It might just be that we never removed all the oil in the first place, if that makes sense

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I use toilet paper too when I run out of tissue paper, works as good! but I make sure to use the inner ply of the toilet paper when there are two or three plys, as you never know what's on the outer side of toilet paper since it's in the toilet.

Personally I must use blotting paper when I go out at night or when I wanna look my best, as it is more efficient in removing oil in a shorter time, and I don't waste too much time bloting with a tissue paper or toilet paper. And my skin is so oily, that if I don't blot and let the oil sit for even 1 hour, my skin looks disgusting. I can have good makeup on but with the oil, the makeup just becomes patchy and the oil sinks into my pores. Mine is the type where it's so oily you can see beads of oil on the nose and t-zones

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Well, a long time ago, before my diet changes turned my formerly grotesquely oily skin to just slightly on the oily side, I tried using powder and it ended up drying my skin. It would still be oily, but also covered in dry flaky skin. I'd say blotting is the better way.

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Those were great tips. If you are not applying BP every day and are not dry, I guess your insight would be helpful. Otherwise, yeah, no need for moisturizers. Your oil is your moisturizer.

1. To save on blotting papers, I suggest that one should either keep perforated tissues from home, or grab some napkins at work or at your favorite eating spot. Starbucks has some nice brown napkins that will manifest how much oil was absorbed ;)

2. Witch Hazel Extract works wonders. there is a huge bottle of witch hazel 1 POUND liquid, sold at iherb for only 5$.

3. This one tip is the most effective but may be detrimental to men (girls consider yourselves lucky). You can buy the active molecule in Green Tea which is called EGCG and pour the powder to your favorite toner, cream, or astringent (mine witch hazel).

mechanism of action: EGCG inhibits 5-aR type I enzyme which modulates production of the "male"/androgen hormone DHT - which in turn controls sebum production.

You can also take this orally. (not recommended for men)

Edited by rentstuff
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Hey everyone! Im 14 years old, and I know for a fact that oil is not caused by harsh chemicals(personally). My whole family has oily skin. So I do know that mine is genetic. Ive tried everything

-burning my oily areas with rubbing alcohol

-mattifying foundation, powders

-baby powder

-not doing anything to my face

-blotting papers

and so far, the only thing that keeps me matte for 3 hours is using a powder foundation and then putting extra baby powder on the oily parts. I was reading online that putting Phillips Milk of Magnesia on oil works like a charm so I went out and bought some yesterday! It was 5 dollars at my local drugstore, and I'm trying it out today with no makeup on top just a little baby powder. Lets just say, its not working for me. I'm still oily. I dont know what to do! HELP ME PLEASE!

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Wow, thanks all of you guys for the input!

I have a question about blotting papers that I've been wondering these days. So I know blotting paper gets rid of the surface oil our skin produces, but does it also remove sweat? Because these days I don't really know if it's the oil or sweat thats making my face look shiny.

Also, have any of you on DKR noticed if the BP makes your face look shinier? This is something I have noticed... is this just me?

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Hey everyone! Im 14 years old, and I know for a fact that oil is not caused by harsh chemicals(personally). My whole family has oily skin. So I do know that mine is genetic.

But that doesn't mean your habits don't make it worse. Just like with health conditions and diseases, genetics only count for a percentage of your likelihood to develop a condition or the severity. The rest is what you do.

My formerly grotesquely oily skin is genetic too. Just like everyone else's. But recently my habits have normalized it. Just slightly on the oily side, which is a good thing.

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Very oily skin is more likely caused by hormone levels in your body.

Very oily skin is almost always caused from your skin care. Most of the cleansers on the market strip the skin of its natural oils, causing your skin to "freak" and start trying to compensate. The other "Myth" is that oil-free is better for acne/oily skin. This is also not true. Hazelnut and jojoba oils for example are very good for oily/acne prone skin. Hazelnut oil is astringent on acne/oily skin and can actually help with oil throughout the day (when it is included in a moisturizer not straight on the face) and jojoba is very close to the skins natural sebum so it is readily accepted. The problem with oil-free brands is almost all of them use dimethicone (silicones) as their humectant, this puts a seal over the skin not allowing it to breathe and can cause major breakouts, they also use propelyne glycol as a moisturizer/lubricant, this ingredient is used as a lubricating agent in break fluid for you car and can also cause breakouts. If you don't understand the ingredient it is likely bad for your skin. Also vaselin would never be a good choice for the skin as the main ingredient is Mineral Oil. Mineral oil is a by-product of the gasoline industry (aka petroleum jelly) and like dimethicone does not let the skin breathe and will break you out, it doesn't penetrate the skin so it does not moisturize. You can make your own cleanser and moisturizer at home it's not that hard. Then see if you are still getting really oily, I bet it helps. You can cleanse your skin with............1tbl of kaolin clay (or basic wheat flour), 1 tbl of honey and add water to make a paste. Wash your skin with this, it is all you need, if you have makeup on remove it with jojoba oil first. For a moisturizer you can mix a drop of jojoba and a bit of aloe vera juice (from a health food store in the drink section, not the green goop, it has to be natural and only contain aloe) you could also just use a piece of aloe plant. This should help with the oil.
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