Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Hello, my name is Alex, and i have been suffering from the most awful thing in the world, people like you and me probably know well as, acne. i am a 15 year old boy, a freshmen in school, and i have probably a moderate case of acne, it has gotten a lot better over the years. i started getting acne when i was 13, in 7th grade. I really have been through it all, from proactive, to pads, to gels, to differein, and nothing has made a dramatic change for me. so here i am, 15 years old, lk WTF, gimme a break just go away and leave me alone, though, it isn't that easy. Today i showed my mom information about Accutane on the internet, she did not really know much about the drug, and was not so pumped to hear me wanting to go on it, though i stuck very strong to what i wanted to do, she finally agreed. tommorow she will be calling the dermatologist and making an appointment, the last time i had been there doc said i would be going on accutane if i did not see improvment, though i have seen improvment, i am going to ask for the Accutane, i want to fight my acne, i want to kill it, i want to kick the living sh!t out of it, so lets go acne, a little one on one, me vs. you. so im guessing within the next 2 weeks i will probably be on it, and ready to begin the adventure.

So anyone who is using accutane, has used accutane, or anyone who just has any good information about the drug PLEASE post and help me out through this time in my life, i am miserable, all i want is clear skin.

[tips on what to do while on the drug, things to think about, things to avoid when on the drug, the process, how long it may take, supplies i may need, etc.]

I will keep track of this log, and keep it updated very much, so please help

CURRENT PERSCRIPTION:

50mg Minocycline[Morning&Night]

SFC Lotion[Night]

Duac Topical Gel[Night]

PLEASE HELP!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Take a look at the pinned topics at the beginning of the Accutane forum. They include a lot of information about how to treat possible side-effects, what products to use, and how to keep yourself sane when dealing with Accutane.

Also, I'd recommend just browsing through some of the topics that users have recently posted to get an idea of what others are concerned about. It's a great resource. If you have specific questions, in most cases if you just search the key words of the topic you're wondering about bc someone has probably asked a similar question in the past.

If not, just keep posting in this topic and you'll definitely get some response.

Acne can be very stressful, especially for someone considering Accutane. Just be aware that there are tons of people on this forum that can help you and offer advice. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

that all depends man. Most people only reeeeaallllly see improvement after about three months and some people see the most improvement once they are off the medicine. I have been on it for a little over a month and i have seen some good improvement already so it all depends. But by the end of the course u will almost be guaranteed to either have gotten rid of ur acne, or gotten it to a mild status which is much easier to treat. good luck man i hope ur derm gives u the green light to start accutane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Im going to start counting the days to track how long until my acne is completely gone, feel free to count your days on this log too, lets all support eacthoehr

DAY 1

(NO ACCUTANE)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
..

Hey, dude. Accutane should only be taken for moderate to severe acne (especially persistant acne). I've been on Accutane (claravis) for about three months. You can check out my log if you want some info. Side effects can vary from simple dry skin and dry lips to rashes, joint pain, etc. You will have to get blood tests done every month to make sure your liver is still kickin', as Accutane beats the liver a little, so the Dermatologist wants to make sure it's not damaging it. If you have any more questions, let me know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since you've named this thread Accutane Log and will keep updating it, I'm going to move it over to the log section.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
im goin to my derm next thurs

Have you reached your full height, or are you as tall as you want to be? Considering that you're fifteen, you still have some growing to do particularly if you're male. Accutane can STOP growth as it can cause premature epiphyseal closure on the growth plates of the long bones. That means you could stop growing and remain the size you are for the rest of your life.

It would be better to wait until you're 18 or older to take Accutane.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wasn't aware of that, I'm 15 and will be starting accutane in the next few weeks if nothing drastic happens to my skin. I don't want to sound like I am laughing off the side effects, but I well surpass the criteria for being prescribed it and have had just about enough. I'm pretty much done growing now, I'm just as tall as my dad. Good luck with it all Alex.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Please read the ENTIRE handout that comes with the Accutane and also read the following:

http://www.rxlist.com/accutane-drug.htm#

Psychiatric Disorders

Accutane may cause depression, psychosis and, rarely, suicidal ideation, suicide attempts, suicide, and aggressive and/or violent behaviors. No mechanism of action has been established for these events (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Psychiatric). Prescribers should read the brochure, Recognizing Psychiatric Disorders in Adolescents and Young Adults: A Guide for Prescribers of Isotretinoin. Prescribers should be alert to the warning signs of psychiatric disorders to guide patients to receive the help they need. Therefore, prior to initiation of Accutane therapy, patients and family members should be asked about any history of psychiatric disorder, and at each visit during therapy patients should be assessed for symptoms of depression, mood disturbance, psychosis, or aggression to determine if further evaluation may be necessary. Signs and symptoms of depression, as described in the brochure (“Recognizing Psychiatric Disorders in Adolescents and Young Adultsâ€), include sad mood, hopelessness, feelings of guilt, worthlessness or helplessness, loss of pleasure or interest in activities, fatigue, difficulty concentrating, change in sleep pattern, change in weight or appetite, suicidal thoughts or attempts, restlessness, irritability, acting on dangerous impulses, and persistent physical symptoms unresponsive to treatment. Patients should stop Accutane and the patient or a family member should promptly contact their prescriber if the patient develops depression, mood disturbance, psychosis, or aggression, without waiting until the next visit. Discontinuation of Accutane therapy may be insufficient; further evaluation may be necessary. While such monitoring may be helpful, it may not detect all patients at risk. Patients may report mental health problems or family history of psychiatric disorders. These reports should be discussed with the patient and/or the patient's family. A referral to a mental health professional may be necessary. The physician should consider whether Accutane therapy is appropriate in this setting; for some patients the risks may outweigh the benefits of Accutane therapy.

Pseudotumor Cerebri

Accutane use has been associated with a number of cases of pseudotumor cerebri (benign intracranial hypertension), some of which involved concomitant use of tetracyclines. Concomitant treatment with tetracyclines should therefore be avoided. Early signs and symptoms of pseudotumor cerebri include papilledema, headache, nausea and vomiting, and visual disturbances. Patients with these symptoms should be screened for papilledema and, if present, they should be told to discontinue Accutane immediately and be referred to a neurologist for further diagnosis and care (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Neurological).

Pancreatitis

Acute pancreatitis has been reported in patients with either elevated or normal serum triglyceride levels. In rare instances, fatal hemorrhagic pancreatitis has been reported. Accutane should be stopped if hypertriglyceridemia cannot be controlled at an acceptable level or if symptoms of pancreatitis occur.

Lipids

Elevations of serum triglycerides in excess of 800 mg/dL have been reported in patients treated with Accutane. Marked elevations of serum triglycerides were reported in approximately 25% of patients receiving Accutane in clinical trials. In addition, approximately 15% developed a decrease in high-density lipoproteins and about 7% showed an increase in cholesterol levels. In clinical trials, the effects on triglycerides, HDL, and cholesterol were reversible upon cessation of Accutane therapy. Some patients have been able to reverse triglyceride elevation by reduction in weight, restriction of dietary fat and alcohol, and reduction in dose while continuing Accutane.5

Blood lipid determinations should be performed before Accutane is given and then at intervals until the lipid response to Accutane is established, which usually occurs within 4 weeks. Especially careful consideration must be given to risk/benefit for patients who may be at high risk during Accutane therapy (patients with diabetes, obesity, increased alcohol intake, lipid metabolism disorder or familial history of lipid metabolism disorder). If Accutane therapy is instituted, more frequent checks of serum values for lipids and/or blood sugar are recommended (see PRECAUTIONS: Laboratory Tests).

The cardiovascular consequences of hypertriglyceridemia associated with Accutane are unknown. Animal Studies: In rats given 8 or 32 mg/kg/day of isotretinoin (1.3 to 5.3 times the recommended clinical dose of 1.0 mg/kg/day after normalization for total body surface area) for 18 months or longer, the incidences of focal calcification, fibrosis and inflammation of the myocardium, calcification of coronary, pulmonary and mesenteric arteries, and metastatic calcification of the gastric mucosa were greater than in control rats of similar age. Focal endocardial and myocardial calcifications associated with calcification of the coronary arteries were observed in two dogs after approximately 6 to 7 months of treatment with isotretinoin at a dosage of 60 to 120 mg/kg/day (30 to 60 times the recommended clinical dose of 1.0 mg/kg/day, respectively, after normalization for total body surface area).

Hearing Impairment

Impaired hearing has been reported in patients taking Accutane; in some cases, the hearing impairment has been reported to persist after therapy has been discontinued. Mechanism(s) and causality for this event have not been established. Patients who experience tinnitus or hearing impairment should discontinue Accutane treatment and be referred for specialized care for further evaluation (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Special Senses).

Hepatotoxicity

Clinical hepatitis considered to be possibly or probably related to Accutane therapy has been reported. Additionally, mild to moderate elevations of liver enzymes have been observed in approximately 15% of individuals treated during clinical trials, some of which normalized with dosage reduction or continued administration of the drug. If normalization does not readily occur or if hepatitis is suspected during treatment with Accutane, the drug should be discontinued and the etiology further investigated.

Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Accutane has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (including regional ileitis) in patients without a prior history of intestinal disorders. In some instances, symptoms have been reported to persist after Accutane treatment has been stopped. Patients experiencing abdominal pain, rectal bleeding or severe diarrhea should discontinue Accutane immediately (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Gastrointestinal).

Skeletal

Bone Mineral Density

Effects of multiple courses of Accutane on the developing musculoskeletal system are unknown. There is some evidence that long-term, high-dose, or multiple courses of therapy with isotretinoin have more of an effect than a single course of therapy on the musculoskeletal system. In an open-label clinical trial (N=217) of a single course of therapy with Accutane for severe recalcitrant nodular acne, bone density measurements at several skeletal sites were not significantly decreased (lumbar spine change > -4% and total hip change > -5%) or were increased in the majority of patients. One patient had a decrease in lumbar spine bone mineral density > 4% based on unadjusted data. Sixteen (7.9%) patients had decreases in lumbar spine bone mineral density > 4%, and all the other patients (92%) did not have significant decreases or had increases (adjusted for body mass index). Nine patients (4.5%) had a decrease in total hip bone mineral density > 5% based on unadjusted data. Twenty-one (10.6%) patients had decreases in total hip bone mineral density > 5%, and all the other patients (89%) did not have significant decreases or had increases (adjusted for body mass index). Follow-up studies performed in 8 of the patients with decreased bone mineral density for up to 11 months thereafter demonstrated increasing bone density in 5 patients at the lumbar spine, while the other 3 patients had lumbar spine bone density measurements below baseline values. Total hip bone mineral densities remained below baseline (range -1.6% to -7.6%) in 5 of 8 patients (62.5%).

In a separate open-label extension study of 10 patients, ages 13-18 years, who started a second course of Accutane 4 months after the first course, two patients showed a decrease in mean lumbar spine bone mineral density up to 3.25% (see PRECAUTIONS: Pediatric Use).

Spontaneous reports of osteoporosis, osteopenia, bone fractures, and delayed healing of bone fractures have been seen in the Accutane population. While causality to Accutane has not been established, an effect cannot be ruled out. Longer term effects have not been studied. It is important that Accutane be given at the recommended doses for no longer than the recommended duration.

Hyperostosis

A high prevalence of skeletal hyperostosis was noted in clinical trials for disorders of keratinization with a mean dose of 2.24 mg/kg/day. Additionally, skeletal hyperostosis was noted in 6 of 8 patients in a prospective study of disorders of keratinization.6 Minimal skeletal hyperostosis and calcification of ligaments and tendons have also been observed by x-ray in prospective studies of nodular acne patients treated with a single course of therapy at recommended doses. The skeletal effects of multiple Accutane treatment courses for acne are unknown.

In a clinical study of 217 pediatric patients (12 to 17 years) with severe recalcitrant nodular acne, hyperostosis was not observed after 16 to 20 weeks of treatment with approximately 1 mg/kg/day of Accutane given in two divided doses. Hyperostosis may require a longer time frame to appear. The clinical course and significance remain unknown.

Premature Epiphyseal Closure

There are spontaneous reports of premature epiphyseal closure in acne patients receiving recommended doses of Accutane. The effect of multiple courses of Accutane on epiphyseal closure is unknown.

Vision Impairment

Visual problems should be carefully monitored. All Accutane patients experiencing visual difficulties should discontinue Accutane treatment and have an ophthalmological examination (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Special Senses).

Corneal Opacities

Corneal opacities have occurred in patients receiving Accutane for acne and more frequently when higher drug dosages were used in patients with disorders of keratinization. The corneal opacities that have been observed in clinical trial patients treated with Accutane have either completely resolved or were resolving at follow-up 6 to 7 weeks after discontinuation of the drug (see ADVERSE REACTIONS: Special Senses).

Decreased Night Vision

Decreased night vision has been reported during Accutane therapy and in some instances the event has persisted after therapy was discontinued. Because the onset in some patients was sudden, patients should be advised of this potential problem and warned to be cautious when driving or operating any vehicle at night.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

just woke up and my face looks a bit better, i still am NOT on accutane, i am on minocycline, im hoping the derm will still perscrivbe me with accutane thursday

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Hello, my name is Alex, and i have been suffering from the most awful thing in the world, people like you and me probably know well as, acne. i am a 15 year old boy, a freshmen in school, and i have probably a moderate case of acne, it has gotten a lot better over the years. i started getting acne when i was 13, in 7th grade. I really have been through it all, from proactive, to pads, to gels, to differein, and nothing has made a dramatic change for me. so here i am, 15 years old, lk WTF, gimme a break just go away and leave me alone, though, it isn't that easy. Today i showed my mom information about Accutane on the internet, she did not really know much about the drug, and was not so pumped to hear me wanting to go on it, though i stuck very strong to what i wanted to do, she finally agreed. tommorow she will be calling the dermatologist and making an appointment, the last time i had been there doc said i would be going on accutane if i did not see improvment, though i have seen improvment, i am going to ask for the Accutane, i want to fight my acne, i want to kill it, i want to kick the living sh!t out of it, so lets go acne, a little one on one, me vs. you. so im guessing within the next 2 weeks i will probably be on it, and ready to begin the adventure.

So anyone who is using accutane, has used accutane, or anyone who just has any good information about the drug PLEASE post and help me out through this time in my life, i am miserable, all i want is clear skin.

[tips on what to do while on the drug, things to think about, things to avoid when on the drug, the process, how long it may take, supplies i may need, etc.]

I will keep track of this log, and keep it updated very much, so please help

CURRENT PERSCRIPTION:

50mg Minocycline[Morning&Night]

SFC Lotion[Night]

Duac Topical Gel[Night]

PLEASE HELP!!

Hi, I took this drug when I started to get bad acne around the age of 13. My dr. was afraid that I would get scars from my acne since it wasn't going away. Accutane, cured my acne, after doing 1 course for 6 months or so at a low dosage. I have done a lot of research on this drug and the most important thing I can tell you is DONT TAKE IT FOR MORE THAN ONE COURSE. I have read actual medical case studies that have scientific documentation stating that when this drug is in the system long enough (more than one course worth) it gets in your bones and stops them from growing. One course is usually safe, but only take it if your acne is BAD and ONLY for ONE course of treatment. Good luck and ask your Dr. what they have to say about Accutane stunting bone growth then post what they had to say on here. That info might help a lot of people.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello, my name is Alex, and i have been suffering from the most awful thing in the world, people like you and me probably know well as, acne. i am a 15 year old boy, a freshmen in school, and i have probably a moderate case of acne, it has gotten a lot better over the years. i started getting acne when i was 13, in 7th grade. I really have been through it all, from proactive, to pads, to gels, to differein, and nothing has made a dramatic change for me. so here i am, 15 years old, lk WTF, gimme a break just go away and leave me alone, though, it isn't that easy. Today i showed my mom information about Accutane on the internet, she did not really know much about the drug, and was not so pumped to hear me wanting to go on it, though i stuck very strong to what i wanted to do, she finally agreed. tommorow she will be calling the dermatologist and making an appointment, the last time i had been there doc said i would be going on accutane if i did not see improvment, though i have seen improvment, i am going to ask for the Accutane, i want to fight my acne, i want to kill it, i want to kick the living sh!t out of it, so lets go acne, a little one on one, me vs. you. so im guessing within the next 2 weeks i will probably be on it, and ready to begin the adventure.

So anyone who is using accutane, has used accutane, or anyone who just has any good information about the drug PLEASE post and help me out through this time in my life, i am miserable, all i want is clear skin.

[tips on what to do while on the drug, things to think about, things to avoid when on the drug, the process, how long it may take, supplies i may need, etc.]

I will keep track of this log, and keep it updated very much, so please help

CURRENT PERSCRIPTION:

50mg Minocycline[Morning&Night]

SFC Lotion[Night]

Duac Topical Gel[Night]

PLEASE HELP!!

[/quote/]

Accutane or Roaccutane (as it is called in the UK) can only be prescribed to people of the age 17 and over in the UK or 16 if a serious case of acne however i do not know how this stands in the US. The reason you need to be of this age is because of its affects on the Liver, It is a high dose of Vitamin A, essentially, and is very harmful to the liver, almost always causing Jaundice (Yellowing of the skin) and variuos other problems, like not being able to produce Bile, Stomach and digestion tract problems and so on. And along with Juandice it almost always produces severe dryness of the skin on your lips and around your eyes and nostrils, which can become extremely painful and you would constantly be needing to apply vaseline or moisturising lotion to these areas, every 5-10 minutes. I would suggest asking your doctor or dermatologist to put you on a course of Erythromycin, or Tetralysal/Lymecycline WITH Clyndamycin Phosphat topical lotion as these have almost no serious side affects, Roaccutane should always be left as a last resort.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted · Hidden by AyeAye, July 31, 2013 - warning issued.
Hidden by AyeAye, July 31, 2013 - warning issued.
I have just started Accutane as well. I know exactly what troubles you are going through! I started a blog to track my Accutane journey and provide my experience. Please read my blog for helpful tips, do's and don'ts, skincare routine, and many
more!!

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×