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rcr0412

gluten intolerance and acne connection

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i am basically suspecting a gluten intolerance as the main cause of my acne, since eliminating gluten months ago my skin has improved greatly, even in the past 2 weeks i have been of topicals i have only got a few small pimples, i think the people who are having problems with gluten should be tested for celiacs or at least gluten sensitivity, not just for acne but for the other various issues gluten intolerance can cause, celiac is a severely under diagnosed disease 1 in 100 have it, for every one diagnosed 140 is undiagnosed. not to mention the fact that lactose intolerance is an effect of poorly managed celiacs. has anyone tried the enterolab test or the blood test, the only hesitation about the blood test i have is the fact you have to go on gluten for 6 weeks and that could cause me not only digestive but acne problems, just looking for any advice. my suggestion is though for people who notice they react to wheat is to get tested for this, it is a silent killer and most people don't even know what it is.

Thanks

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Yeah my mom was diagnosed with Celiac disease last December. I was also checked and I luckily do not have it, but I eat gluten free with her most of the time. It is so hard to eat gluten free, since gluten is in everything(even most sauces).

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yea i agree, it is very hard, eating out is the worst, but it is worth it, even though you got a negative diagnosis you still could have an intolerance or develop it though, i hope you never get to that point but just be careful

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My mom is celiac. Unfortunately, that doesn't mean anything to her. She still eats all the gluten she wants. I really wish she wouldn't, but you can't teach an old dog new tricks I suppose.

Anyway, I haven't actually tested to see if I'm celiac or gluten intolerant, but based on how gluten affects my skin, I doubt that a test would change my mindset anyway.

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the thing is i am wondering is it the gluten that causes acne or is it the symptoms of the gluten intolerance, i am wondering is it possible to still get acne from gluten if you are not intolerant, i mean say you didn't have acne from gluten, you could still have an intolerance

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the thing is i am wondering is it the gluten that causes acne or is it the symptoms of the gluten intolerance, i am wondering is it possible to still get acne from gluten if you are not intolerant, i mean say you didn't have acne from gluten, you could still have an intolerance

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Millions of people (some even go as far as to say most people) are sensitive to wheat or gluten, to one degree or another, and should therefore avoid it.

Consider these facts:

  • Millions are allergic to wheat - it is, after all, one of the top eight allergens.

  • Nearly 3 million people have celiac disease (although sadly, most don't know it and probably never will). It's the most common genetic disease of mankind (yet for every person diagnosed, 140 will go undiagnosed).

  • Remarkable numbers of autistic kids (including Asperger's and others on the PDD-NOS spectrum) are showing improvement on a gluten-free/casein-free dietary protocol.

  • Many autoimmune diseases other than celiac disease show improvement in symptoms on a gluten-free diet.

  • No one knows the numbers for sure, but a huge segment of the population is 'gluten sensitive' or 'intolerant' without having celiac disease.

  • People go on Atkins, Zone, and other low-carb (virtually gluten-free) diets and experience vast improvements in health and vitality. Perhaps they were gluten-sensitive to start?

  • Wheat products are often high-glycemic-index foods like bagels, cakes, and cookies. These foods can contribute to obesity, heart disease, and diabetes.

  • 'The Wisdom of Menopause,' a bestselling book, suggests menopausal women should avoid wheat.

  • Dr. Nicholas Perricone suggests avoiding carbs and high-glycemic-index foods (like bagels, bread, cookies, cake) to improve complexion and reduce wrinkles.

  • There is an association between starchy foods (like bagels, bread, cookies, cake) and ovarian cancer.

We know that humans don't fully digest wheat. Animals with more than one stomach, like cows and sheep do. But we don't. That means undigested gluten gets into the stomach, where it can ferment, causing gas and boating.*

We also know that wheat, even in people without an intolerance, can cause 'leaky gut syndrome' by creating a more permeable intestinal lining. This extra permeability allows gluten, toxins, and other substances, to get into the bloodstream where they can initiate immune responses and produce otherwise unexplainable symptoms.*

* Center for Celiac Research, Baltimore, MD

http://www.glutenfreedom.net/wheat-free-gl...ould-you-be.asp

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My younger sister has celiac disease, really badly too. She's been gluten free since she was 2 or something. Ironically, has crystal clear skin, never had a pimple in her life. Me.. I inherited acne from my mom. The thing with celiac disease is you need to have a gene for it. I have the gene, I'm sure many others in my family have it too, but it has never been triggered in me. So I don't have a gluten intolerance yet, but I could develop it anytime in my life. My other sister actually doesn't have the gene, but has allergies to wheat, barley, etc. I think having the gene test may tell you a lot personally. If you don't have the gene, it may be allergies and not an intolerance.

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Please everyone....refrain from using the term allergies.

It is way too confusing because an allergy is only oneof 4 or 5 types of Hypersensitivity Reactions. If you get tested for "allergies" and everything is "normal" than automatically that must mean you aren't "allergic" to a food, chemical, microbe etc.....but that may notbe true.

You were only tested for antibody reactions involving usually IgE or possibly IgG....but there are otherantibodies AND there are other ways our immune cells can react to an antigen/trigger.

In the case of Celiac Disease...it looks at several antibodies and yes...you can test negative as I did(still had antibodies) and follow the diet anyway and note whether your symptoms improve. This is because...there are various levels of sensitivity to a trigger....and some of them may be undectable by serological tests (blood tests) or even endoscopic tests....but the Gold Standard has always been to avoid and see if symptoms improve.

:angel:

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