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Vitamin K and B-3 Beneficial to Skin

By: Debra

http://www.articlejoe.com/Article/Vitamin-...l-to-Skin/21165

Vitamin K and Vitamin B-3, also known as niacin, have long been known to have non-skin related health benefits, but recent studies have shown that both vitamins have dermatological applications.

“Vitamins continue to be reorganized as having an important role to play in the health of the body,� says Dr David Smith, chief researcher at Skin White Research Labs. 'New studies have shown that Vitamin K and niacin are beneficial to the skin, particularly for the problems involving pigmentation and dry skin.�

Vitamin K plays an important role in blood clotting, and studies have shown it to maintain strong bones in the elderly. However, dermatologists have recently found Vitamin K to be successful on the treatment of dark circles under the eyesand bruising on the face.

A recent study included two groups, one that applied an under-eye cream containing sunscreen and another that applied an under-eye cream containing a combination of Vitamin K and retinol. An examination of the under-eye colour at the beginning of the study and at the end found a significant lightening in the group using the vitamin K and retinol combination.

Vitamin K has also recently been studied for its effects on reducing bruising following certain dermatological procedures. Those patients who applied the Vitamin K after the procedure noticed a significant reduction in the severity of bruising.

One derivative of niacin, nicotinamide, has been shown to improve the ability of the epidermis to retain moisture. In a recent study, topical nicotinamide was applied to the skin for six-days. Following the study, all patients reported softer, smoother skin, less dryness and flakiness, and a reduction in lines.

“The benefits to the skin after application of nicotinamide can be useful for patients with atopic dermatitis, who often experience dry, irritated skin when the disease flares,� suggests Dr Smith. “This could be another promising treatment for ageing skin, which often becomes dry and flaky as we age.�

Niacinamide, another derivative, has also been shown to be an effective skin lightening agent, especially for skin condition where hyperpigmentation may occur on the face or other visible part of the body. Patients with hyperpigmentation were analyzed by computer and most patients experienced decreased hyperpigmentation and increased skin lightness.

Topical niacinamide has also been shown to have anti-inflammatory properties, which makes it a potential treatment for acne, rosacea and any blistering-type disease. Recent studies also noted that niacin and its derivatives have chemopreventative effects. When applied to mouse skin, topical nicotinamide produced a 70 per cent decrease in ultra-violet-induced skin cancer.

Article Source: http://www.ArticleJoe.com

Article contributed by Debra Tan who is a senior product development consultant at Skin White Research Labs. Equipped with a team of experienced cosmeceutical researchers, SkinWhite Research Labs is a company that specializes in the formulation of skin whitening products that help to rectify dark skin and pigmentation problems. Please visit their official website for more skin lightening information and tips.

Vitamin K

Stunning new research shows that vitamin K may be one of the most extraordinary anti-aging vitamins ever discovered. It has unique powers no other vitamin possesses

Vitamin K and blood sugar

The pancreas has the second highest amount of vitamin K in the body. This suggests the vitamin may have something to do with controlling blood sugar. In the first study of its kind, researchers in Japan looked at vitamin K's effect on glucose and insulin. In a study on rats, they found that vitamin K deficiency initially impedes the clearance of glucose, then causes too much insulin to be released. This can be plotted on a graph that looks very similar to what occurs in diabetes.

Some clients have reported success with diminishing red marks after acne lesions or trauma to the skin with Vitamin K

http://911skin.com/advanced-rescue-5-vitamin-k-cream.html

http://www.lef.org/magazine/mag2000/feb00-report.html

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All leafy green vegetables have vitamin K.

MB, I've gotten high amounts of vit. K from juicing, it never "cleared" me but the fresh raw juicing of green veggies itself has ben beneficial.

I tried topical niacin before I really had any acne problems, back when my acne could be easily controlled by BP. With that said, I think I remember liking it better then BP, even though the solution was pretty alcoholic, but didn't get more as I didn't want to see the doc again to get another prescription.

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it's also interesting to note, that high vitamin e intake can lower vitamin k in extrahepatic tissues:

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/cont...3-7075-3-29.pdf

vitamin e and vitamin k seem to be antagonists.

All leafy green vegetables have vitamin K.

Green leafy vegetables contain vitamin K1, which is an inferior form of vitamin k.

K2 which is found in animal fats - especially liver, egg yolks and butter - is the kind of vitamin k, that the body prefers. K2 is also found in fairly high amounts in a fermented soy product called natto.

If you decide to supplement with vitamin k, I would choose K2 in the form of Menatetrenone. Here's why:

http://www.aor.ca/magazines/pdf/K2_Menatet...e_winter_03.pdf

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it's also interesting to note, that high vitamin e intake can lower vitamin k in extrahepatic tissues:

http://www.nutritionandmetabolism.com/cont...3-7075-3-29.pdf

vitamin e and vitamin k seem to be antagonists.

All leafy green vegetables have vitamin K.

Green leafy vegetables contain vitamin K1, which is an inferior form of vitamin k.

K2 which is found in animal fats - especially liver, egg yolks and butter - is the kind of vitamin k, that the body prefers. K2 is also found in fairly high amounts in a fermented soy product called natto.

If you decide to supplement with vitamin k, I would choose K2 in the form of Menatetrenone. Here's why:

http://www.aor.ca/magazines/pdf/K2_Menatet...e_winter_03.pdf

Interesting. Well I recently added chicken liver to my diet because I found a really good (organic free range) source that sells it cheap as hell. One of the healthiest animal products if you ask me (up there with fish and eggs), unless you get nonorganic and then you're poisoning yourself.

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yes, I agree. Liver is probably the most nutritious food on earth. I eat it once a week. I eat chicken, calf and rabbit liver. I can also recommend to eat kidneys! Calfs kidneys are delicious and very high in b-vitamins, almost as high as liver. I eat calfs kidneys once a week. :angel:

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Cutis. 2006 Jan;77(1 Suppl):11-6. Links

Pharmacologic doses of nicotinamide in the treatment of inflammatory skin conditions: a review.Niren NM.

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania, USA.

Various skin disorders with an inflammatory component often have been treated with steroids and/or oral antibiotics. However, long-term use of these agents has drawbacks: steroids may induce numerous serious side effects such as hypertension, immunosuppression, and osteoporosis, and overuse of oral antibiotics may contribute to the development of bacterial resistance, as well as to a host of nuisance side effects such as diarrhea, yeast infections, and photosensitivity. As a result, alternative oral treatments, such as nicotinamide, have been investigated. During the past 50 years, many clinical reports have identified nicotinamide as a beneficial agent in the treatment of a variety of inflammatory skin disorders; what's more, its exceptional safety profile at pharmacologic doses makes it a potentially ideal long-term oral therapy for patients with inflammatory skin diseases. A recent large study evaluating nicotinamide for the treatment of acne or rosacea has confirmed the potential benefits of oral nicotinamide as an alternative approach to managing inflammatory lesions associated with acne vulgaris and acne rosacea.This article reviews the substantial number of reports published over the past 50 years that document the clinical utility and safety of oral and topical formulations of nicotinamide for the treatment of a variety of inflammatory skin conditions.

PMID: 16871774 [PubMed - in process]

Cutis. 2006 Jan;77(1 Suppl):17-28. Links

The Nicomide Improvement in Clinical Outcomes Study (NICOS): results of an 8-week trial. Niren NM, Torok HM.

University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania, USA.

The Nicomide Improvement in Clinical Outcomes Study (NICOS) was an open-label, multicenter, prospective cohort study designed to assess the clinical utility of oral pharmacologic doses of nicotinamide and zinc in 198 patients with acne vulgaris and/or rosacea. The study's primary efficacy measures were patient global evaluation and patient evaluation of the percentage of reduction in inflammatory lesions after 4 and 8 weeks of treatment; overall patient satisfaction also was recorded. The study formulation consisted of nicotinamide 750 mg, zinc 25 mg, copper 1.5 mg, and folic acid 500 microg, marketed as Nicomide (Nic/Zn).Nic/Zn was designed to deliver adequate concentrations of nicotinamide and zinc to effectively treat inflammatory cutaneous conditions with a safety profile suitable for long-term administration. After a relatively short treatment period of 4 weeks, the number of patients enrolled in NICOS who reported improvement was significantly greater (P<.0001) than the number who reported either no change in or worsening of their condition. Of the patients studied, 79% reported their improvement in appearance as moderately better or much better, as measured by patient global evaluation, and 55% reported moderate (26%-50% reduction in lesions) or substantial (>50% reduction in lesions) improvement after 4 weeks of treatment (P<.0001).The percentage of patients who responded to therapy continued to increase through the 8 weeks of treatment. When comparing patients who received concomitant oral antibiotic therapy (51/198, 26%) with those who received Nic/Zn tablets as their only oral therapy (147/198, 74%), the percentage of patients who responded to treatment was not significantly different between treatment groups (P=. 13). This finding was particularly interesting given that most patients studied considered their condition to be of at least moderate severity (143/198, 72%). It appears that the addition of an oral antibiotic to a treatment regimen that includes Nic/Zn tablets may not be necessary because the combination did not significantly increase the percentage of patients responding. Nic/Zn tablets appear to be an effective oral therapy for the treatment of acne vulgaris and rosacea when used alone or with other topical therapies and should be considered a useful alternative approach to oral antibiotics for the treatment of acne vulgaris and rosacea.

PMID: 16871775 [PubMed - in process]

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