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Find out if you have Food Allergies! Very important!

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Many of us who are tested for allergies are not tested for food allergies. They must be specifically tested for, not by pricking the skin, but by blood test.

There are even doctors who say diet has no affect on acne, but that is extremely misleading.

If you're allergic to some type of food, that food will cause inflammation, which can lead to acne as well as dozens of other problems.

There are cultures that have no acne whatsoever simply because of their diet.

If you don't think you have any food allergies, think of it this way.

Having a dairy allergy is actually the NORM. Drinking another animal's milk isn't natural. People who aren't allergic have adapted! It's true.

Dairy allergies are extremely common, though sometimes subtle.

You may have noticed having a breakout after eating pizza, or icecream, or a cheese omelet. You also might feel tired and in a bad mood, or depressed. These are common side effects of having a food allergy.

If you really want to cure yourself, and I'm sure you do, take an ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay).

This way you'll know exactly which foods to cut out of your diet. Until you take the test, try to simply stop eating dairy products, because there is a good chance, especially if you have other allergies, that you have some degree of dairy allergy. Of course, take a multi-vitamin or get your calcium from another source.

Try using soy milk instead of milk, I think it tastes better anyway.

Even the most subtle food allergies can cause acne, because for the entire duration the food is in your system, it causes inflammation.

Next time you have an appointment with your primary care physician, or if you have a way to contact him/her, ask about taking an ELISA.

It could solve all of your problems with acne.

Sincerely Word,

Toby Turner

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Many of us who are tested for allergies are not tested for food allergies. They must be specifically tested for, not by pricking the skin, but by blood test.

There are even doctors who say diet has no affect on acne, but that is extremely misleading.

If you're allergic to some type of food, that food will cause inflammation, which can lead to acne as well as dozens of other problems.

........................................

Dairy allergies are extremely common, though sometimes subtle.

You may have noticed having a breakout after eating pizza, or icecream, or a cheese omelet. You also might feel tired and in a bad mood, or depressed. These are common side effects of having a food allergy.

If you really want to cure yourself, and I'm sure you do, take an ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay).

This way you'll know exactly which foods to cut out of your diet. Until you take the test, try to simply stop eating dairy products, because there is a good chance, especially if you have other allergies, that you have some degree of dairy allergy. Of course, take a multi-vitamin or get your calcium from another source.

Try using soy milk instead of milk, I think it tastes better anyway.

Even the most subtle food allergies can cause acne, because for the entire duration the food is in your system, it causes inflammation.

Next time you have an appointment with your primary care physician, or if you have a way to contact him/her, ask about taking an ELISA.

It could solve all of your problems with acne.

Sincerely Word,

Toby Turner

Thanks so much for mentioning this. :angel: More specifically we should find out if we have food hypersensitivies. People use the word allergy back and forth though, so I guess it makes it confusing.

An ELISA is an Food Intolerance Test that looks at specific Hypersensitives dealing with IgG antibodies. Usually known as Type III Immune Complex Hypersensitivies (a form of an immediate reaction occuring within 24 hours). Acne is associated with this form as well as Type IV Cell Mediated Hypersensitivities (a delayed reaction occuring with in 48 - 72 hours or later), but this form can notbe detected on an ELISA test because you aren't looking at antibodies but PMN leukocytes (white blood cells). Therefore if one TRULY wanted to test to see if they had food and/or chemical induced acne, they would have to take several tests, one for each type of Hypersensitivy (4 or 5 types)!

For those interested in an ELISA or some other form of a Food Intolerance Test costs several hundered dollars, offer varying ranges of support (3, 6, or 12 months), and provide you with 3 sets of food lists. For example York Allergy has one posted on Amazon (you can also go to their website), here's the description:

$379

Our IgG ELISA At-Home Food Intolerance Test Kit allows you to be screened against 96 foods (including gluten & gliadin) for food intolerance (delayed food allergy) in the privacy and comfort of your own home. This clinically validated laboratory analysiswill accurately identify which foods are the culprits behind your ill-health. Once your specimen has been collected, by use of our simple "pin-prick" method (no blood draw is required), it is mailed to our laboratory for analysis (we provide the pre-addressed, pre-paid, plastic international bio-shipping return mailer).

When your food intolerance screening is completed, you will be sent a detailed report showing which foods you were screened against and which ones tested as being positive (offending)and which ones were negative (safe). In addition to your printed test results, you will receive the 48-page Food Intolerance Guidebook. This Guidebook is full of valuable information including:

* 2-page multi-colored test result + an additional 2-page B& W colored copy. (The colored copy for yourself and the B& W copy can be shared with your doctor, dietician, nutritionist, etc.)

* A letter of interpretation from our office.

* Easy-to-follow information on implementing your test results.

* Recipes.

* Food lists.

* Food family cross-reference guide.

* Nutrition chart.

* Progress checklist.

* Dietary recommendations.

* A listing of various companies that provide products and literature, which you will find useful while on your elimination diet.

* A detailed receipt with your test results which will reflect the appropriate CPT code and insurance information so you may submit it to your insurance carrier for possiblereimbursement.

Additionally, you will automatically receive 12 months of unlimited and complimentary support, which will assist and support you with the recommendations provided by your foodSCAN test results and in the Food Intolerance Guidebook.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0006U6KJ...lance&n=3760901

More Info:

ELISA Food Allergy and Intolerance Testing

The food allergy and intolerance test is called an ELISA (ee-LIE-zuh) Food Allergy and Intolerance Panel. ELISA stands for Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay, a term describing the biochemical process whereby antibodies are detected in your blood.

This test is a direct measurement of your immune system's response to food. It is not affected by what you ate the day of the test or even the week of the test.

The ELISA food allergy and intolerance test measures both IgG and IgE antibodies, unlike other food allergy testing.

In a normal healthy person, or in someone with no food allergies, no antibodies will be detected. However, in a high percentage of people with chronic health problems, this test reveals elevated antibodies to a specific food or foods. Invariably, these people feel better after removal of the offending food(s) and treatment for deficiencies related to their food allergy.

Why Skin Testing Doesn’t Work For Food Allergies

If you thought you might have an allergy, your doctor likely ordered a skin test. Skin testing for food allergies has been the traditional way to test for allergies for several decades. This test involves injecting a substance under the skin and measuring the resulting inflammation, also known as a wheal.

In skin testing, the wheal is measured. The size of the wheal determines whether or not an allergy is diagnosed. The technique leaves a lot to be desired because we don’t inject food under our skin, nor do we necessarily get a red bump when we have a food allergy. Equally importantly, this test only has the potential to measure one type of antibody response, called IgE.

“What’s IgE,� you ask? Good question. First, you need to understand that the immune system is very complex. Numerous kinds of antibodies are produced, including IgE , IgG, and many others. They are called immunoglobulins. If you are deathly allergic to something then it is usually an IgE reaction. (However, you can have an IgE reaction to food that isn’t deadly.) The problem is that most food allergies are not IgE, but rather IgG reactions. IgG is adelayed response that typically shows up hours later and may never result in a wheal. However, IgG is a potent stimulator of the inflammatory process, resulting in a variety of allergy symptoms in people.

The most accurate way to detect food allergies is through ELISA testing of the blood. This food allergy testing method measures the actual amount of both IgE and IgG in the blood.

http://www.foodallergysolutions.com/allergy-testing.html

Food Allergy Test - Sample Report

http://www.foodallergysolutions.com/allerg...ing-sample.html (for sample report)

Another example:

The ALCAT Test (14 different types ranging from $87.50 - $1000) http://www.alcat.com/catalog/

The ALCAT Test is proven to be accurate in identifying the relevant foods and substances associated with the many types of chronic inflammatory and metabolic disorders by identifying food, mold and chemical sensitivities.

By definition, "allergies" to foods are acute and the symptom onset is rapid, sometimes within moments. The biological cause is very well understood and because of the rapid symptom onset, testing is usually not necessary to identify the culprit. These reactions are not very common but if you think you have a "true" food allergy it is wise to visit an allergist for comprehensive testing and advice on precautions.

More commonly, delayed adverse reactions to foods, additives and other chemicals are not really classical allergiesand the delay of symptom onset and the multitude of possible pathogenic mechanisms involved render the identification of the offending food(s) or substance(s) to be much more complicated.

Whereas approximately only 2-5% of the US pop. has a classical allergy to a food it is estimated that as many as 80-90% of the pop. has some form of adverse reaction to one or more foods or additives manifesting in a broad range of disorders; including, migraine headache, weight gain, fatigue, hyperactivity/ADD, arthritis, breathing and skin disorders, recurring ear infections in children, depression and various others.

Standard allergy tests, such as skin testing, are not accurate for these type of reactions as they measure only a single mechanism, such as mast cell release of histamine or the presence in the blood of the IgE molecules associated with such release.

The ALCAT Test is available in the United States as well as the U.K., Italy, Denmark, Israel, South Africa, Taiwan, Holland, Ireland, Spain, Greece, Germany, Ukraine, UAE, Kuwait, Saudi Arabia, Jordan, and South America including Colombia, Venezuela and Chile. http://www.alcat.com

Take Care!

PS. It is to be noted that the owner of quack watch doesn't believe in any other method other than skin testing! :snooty: However he DOES believe in some variation of the "Gold Standard", an Elimination Diet and, unfortunately, this is the most accepted and affordable method when it comes to testing for Type IV Delayed Hypersensitivites:

Proper Testing

The correct way to assess a suspected food allergy or intolerance is to begin with a careful record of food intake and symptoms over a period of several weeks. Symptoms such as swollen lips or eyes, hives, or skin rash may be allergy-related, particularly if they occur within a few minutes (up to two hours) after eating. Diarrhea may be related to a food intolerance. Vague symptoms such as dizziness, weakness, or fatigue are not food-related. The history-taking procedure should note the suspected foods, the amounts consumed, the length of time between ingestion and symptoms, whether there is a consistent pattern of symptoms after the food is consumed, and several other factors. Although nearly any food can cause an allergic reaction, a few foods account for about 90% of reactions. Among adults these foods are peanuts, nuts, fish, and shellfish. Among children, they are egg, milk, peanuts, soy, and wheat [14].

If significant symptoms occur, the next step should be to see whether avoiding suspected foods for several weeks prevents possible allergy-related symptoms from recurring. If so, the suspected foods could be reintroduced one at a time to see whether symptoms can be reproduced. However, if the symptoms include hives, vomiting, swollen throat, wheezing, or other difficulty in breathing, continued self-testing could be dangerous, so an allergist should be consulted. http://www.quackwatch.org/01QuackeryRelate...lergytests.html

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You might want to add www.EnteroLab.com. They test for gluten, soy, yeast, egg and dairy sensitivity via stool tests and have a 95% accuracy rate. 5% of the population lacks histamines(?) so the test can be inaccurate if you happen to be part of that 5%.

Each test is $99 and you can order it via the mail or internet. You send your stool sample to them and then you can check your results online.

EnterLab's stool sample test for gluten-sensitivity is even more accurate than the blood test and "gold-standard" biopsy.

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You might want to add www.EnteroLab.com. They test for gluten, soy, yeast, egg and dairy sensitivity via stool tests and have a 95% accuracy rate. 5% of the population lacks histamines(?) so the test can be inaccurate if you happen to be part of that 5%.

Each test is $99 and you can order it via the mail or internet. You send your stool sample to them and then you can check your results online.

EnterLab's stool sample test for gluten-sensitivity is even more accurate than the blood test and "gold-standard" biopsy.

So the specific foods you listed are the only ones it tests for? If willing to shell out the money, would you suggest using one that test for more than that?

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Yes, EnteroLab only tests for those 5 foods.

I am not familiar with ELISA or ALCAT tests and want more information about them.

I certainly would pick EnteroLab over ANY traditional allergy tests offered at my doctor's office - for example, the "scratch test," the "Celiac Blood Test" and the "Celiac Gold-Standard Biopsy Test."

The scratch tests at doctor's offices are worthless. I don't even know why they offer them.

But I know very little about ELISA and ALCAT tests so I cannot give an answer. But if ELISA and ALCAT use blood tests, then I would definitely pick EnteroLab because it is a stool test. The histamines(?) or IgA(?) that all of the tests are measuring are found in copious amounts in the bowel movement after eating an allergenic food. But it takes YEARS AND YEARS for them to finally show up in the blood (and that is why the Celiac Blood Test is only accurate 60% of the time... but the Celiac Stool Test is accurate 95% of the time).

Edited by Dotty1

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I wonder, would it be a good idea to eat every type of food (soy/wheat/dairy/citrus etc) in the few days before the test. That way anything your body reacts to would be present. Do I have this right? I.e. maybe I have a dairy allergy, but I haven't had any dairy in weeks, so the test might not show any reactivity. Do I have this right?

SweetJade hopefully you see this...

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i would be interested to know this as well. I had a stool test done and a parasite was discovered. Too bad it ddidnt help my breakouts or the out of the blue welts and hives I get along my jaw line...I had a DNA test done on a hair sample and was wondering how accurate it was and if anyone has had this done?

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From what I understand, you don't need to add these things back into your diet for the stool sample with Enterolab. I just ran across a thread on a gluten-free discussion board about Enterolab and their results. Thought you might be interested: http://www.glutenfreefaces.com/forum/topics/enterolab-testing

I am going to get this test done. I've researched all of the options and it seems as though the blood testing is not very accurate, although it does test for a LOT of food sensitivities. As a side note, I found out that gluten was a trigger for my acne several months ago. I had eaten homemade (i.e., hand milled) cream of wheat for breakfast and then had whole wheat (again, hand milled) pancakes with my family for supper. I was SO sick from it, I was actually dizzy. I stopped eating gluten-based products as a trial, and wouldn't you know it, my acne improved about 60% in a couple of days. Mind you, I have adult-onset cystic acne, with persistent moderate levels of "surface" acne (a blend of all types), which had been around for 19 years (acquired at age 19, and I just turned 38). I have tried literally EVERYTHING for my acne and this was the first thing that worked that lasted longer than 3 days (I always get a 3-day magical "drop" in symptoms, only to have things return). I've found that my face actually has zone of sensitivity, where gluten made my face inflamed (when you see it that way for 19 years, you forget how inflamed it is!) in certain areas, while I believe dairy bothers 2 areas, and something else is bothering my chin and temples. I got a LOT of relief right away from the gluten-free diet. TInkering with other foods to see if I can get back to a completely clear face. AND, one bite of gluten or dairy, and my face is red and acne returned within 1 day.

Good luck on your search. I am a firm believer now in food sensitivities explaining at least a portion of the acne issues out there. Wish the dermatologists were on board with this kind of thinking....

Emily

SE MI

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From what I understand, you don't need to add these things back into your diet for the stool sample with Enterolab. I just ran across a thread on a gluten-free discussion board about Enterolab and their results. Thought you might be interested: http://www.glutenfre...terolab-testing

I am going to get this test done. I've researched all of the options and it seems as though the blood testing is not very accurate, although it does test for a LOT of food sensitivities. As a side note, I found out that gluten was a trigger for my acne several months ago. I had eaten homemade (i.e., hand milled) cream of wheat for breakfast and then had whole wheat (again, hand milled) pancakes with my family for supper. I was SO sick from it, I was actually dizzy. I stopped eating gluten-based products as a trial, and wouldn't you know it, my acne improved about 60% in a couple of days. Mind you, I have adult-onset cystic acne, with persistent moderate levels of "surface" acne (a blend of all types), which had been around for 19 years (acquired at age 19, and I just turned 38). I have tried literally EVERYTHING for my acne and this was the first thing that worked that lasted longer than 3 days (I always get a 3-day magical "drop" in symptoms, only to have things return). I've found that my face actually has zone of sensitivity, where gluten made my face inflamed (when you see it that way for 19 years, you forget how inflamed it is!) in certain areas, while I believe dairy bothers 2 areas, and something else is bothering my chin and temples. I got a LOT of relief right away from the gluten-free diet. TInkering with other foods to see if I can get back to a completely clear face. AND, one bite of gluten or dairy, and my face is red and acne returned within 1 day.

Good luck on your search. I am a firm believer now in food sensitivities explaining at least a portion of the acne issues out there. Wish the dermatologists were on board with this kind of thinking....

Emily

SE MI

If you eliminated Gluten and you still get Acne then it's Soybean. The reason the blood tests fail is because most Dr's are not aware of both tests that are avaliable for each food. ex Soybean IgE is the 1 they order (it's the standard test), they should be ordering Soybean IgE & IgG. Soybean IgG is sent to a Reference Lab and more accurate. So you NEED TO ASK that both IgE & IgG are ordered on ALL allergy tests (unless not avaliable ( all 9 common allergies are avaliable))

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Im getting lots of testing done including the E95 food allergies blood test.

Im doing hormone testing, heavy metal testing, food allergies, and candida/ parasites.

I am excited to get the results for the food allergies!

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Im looking to get tested as well. I was tested 6-7 years ago when I was breaing out in hives.. and the dr. said i was allergic to soy. How grand is this.. I pretty much each soy products all the time because Im a vegetarian. what now? im going to start taking it out of my diet and see what happens.

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I wish i could make those tests there...the only test available in my country costs 1500 dollars, and it takes a lot of time cause the lab sends it to germany...dissapointing, I gotta do the old school method, eating a lot of it and see if it makes me breakout, just as i figured out bananas, broccoli and carrots break me out.

for people who is expert in allergies/inmmune system. Im allergic to house dust for example and cotton, if im allergic to many things which affects my respiratory system, are there higher posibilities to have allergies to food?

Edited by Chestercool

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Yes, EnteroLab only tests for those 5 foods.

I am not familiar with ELISA or ALCAT tests and want more information about them.

I certainly would pick EnteroLab over ANY traditional allergy tests offered at my doctor's office - for example, the "scratch test," the "Celiac Blood Test" and the "Celiac Gold-Standard Biopsy Test."

The scratch tests at doctor's offices are worthless. I don't even know why they offer them.

But I know very little about ELISA and ALCAT tests so I cannot give an answer. But if ELISA and ALCAT use blood tests, then I would definitely pick EnteroLab because it is a stool test. The histamines(?) or IgA(?) that all of the tests are measuring are found in copious amounts in the bowel movement after eating an allergenic food. But it takes YEARS AND YEARS for them to finally show up in the blood (and that is why the Celiac Blood Test is only accurate 60% of the time... but the Celiac Stool Test is accurate 95% of the time).

Just to but in a little bit about the scratch tests. In my experience they are not worthless. My father was diagnosed with 2 of the ten top allergens, that being animal hair (cats) and pollen. Those tests for me came back negative, thankfully, but I am allergic to gluten, that stool test does look like a winner though, specially at only 99$, great for someone without insurance.

Edited by steven m jacobson

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Im getting lots of testing done including the E95 food allergies blood test.

Im doing hormone testing, heavy metal testing, food allergies, and candida/ parasites.

I am excited to get the results for the food allergies!

does insurance cover the E95 blood test? if not, how much money is it?

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Blood tests can only reveal allergies (IgE), not intolerances (IgG). Tests for the latter have no scientific basis, and it's not known if any of the results mean anything. Keep that in mind before you spend a lot of money on them.

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Try using soy milk instead of milk, I think it tastes better anyway.

I know you're trying to help but I just had to correct you on this--soy is one of the most common allergens and very unhealthy in general. Many people make the mistake of getting off dairy and meat and loading up on soy.

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Im getting lots of testing done including the E95 food allergies blood test.

Im doing hormone testing, heavy metal testing, food allergies, and candida/ parasites.

I am excited to get the results for the food allergies!

does insurance cover the E95 blood test? if not, how much money is it?

I don't have insurance so I had to pay for it. It cost about 250$. I got the results back today and wow... i have a lot of allergies.. luckily I have already cut most the things out of my diet that I am sensitive to. I got it done through my naturopath. It's worth looking into :)

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i need my symptoms to go away forever if i stay away from so and so food for a time period. i cannot stay away from a food for the rest of my life...

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Blood tests can only reveal allergies (IgE), not intolerances (IgG). Tests for the latter have no scientific basis, and it's not known if any of the results mean anything. Keep that in mind before you spend a lot of money on them.

This is not true. I had IgE's and IgG's done. My IgG's came back high for Wheat & Barley (Rye not tested, no need). They can shove their "scientific basis" up their azz. I know all my health issues are due to my Delayed Allergic Reaction to Gluten.

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I can sit here and link site after site to assure you IgG testing are legit. It's the Physicians interpratation and people eliminating the food before testing that screw it up. Example: I went 1 week Gluten Free before testing and Wheat came back 4.4 and Barley came back 6.9, the other foods 0. My Doctor said NOTHING to me but I continued going GF only to get AMAZING results. This is why me and that link suggest you get a copy of the results. Anything over zero is a allergy. BUT not according to Doctors.

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http://www.healingna...es/allergy4.php

allergy IgG tests are questionable

I can sit here and link site after site to assure you IgG testing are legit. It's the Physicians interpratation and people eliminating the food before testing that screw it up. Example: I went 1 week Gluten Free before testing and Wheat came back 4.4 and Barley came back 6.9, the other foods 0. My Doctor said NOTHING to me but I continued going GF only to get AMAZING results. This is why me and that link suggest you get a copy of the results. Anything over zero is a allergy. BUT not according to Doctors.

I don't believe doctors. But these tests cost way too much and didn't help me at all. Even without testing everybody here knows that eliminating gluten is first thing to do if you want to get rid of acne holistically.

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http://www.healingna...es/allergy4.php

allergy IgG tests are questionable

I can sit here and link site after site to assure you IgG testing are legit. It's the Physicians interpratation and people eliminating the food before testing that screw it up. Example: I went 1 week Gluten Free before testing and Wheat came back 4.4 and Barley came back 6.9, the other foods 0. My Doctor said NOTHING to me but I continued going GF only to get AMAZING results. This is why me and that link suggest you get a copy of the results. Anything over zero is a allergy. BUT not according to Doctors.

I don't believe doctors. But these tests cost way too much and didn't help me at all. Even without testing everybody here knows that eliminating gluten is first thing to do if you want to get rid of acne holistically.

This is the place that did my testing along with many others in my area...http://www.questdiagnostics.com/brand/company/b_comp_us_facilities.html

The hospital I work for and every other around send their send out tests to Quest only.

As for cost, I didn't pay anything. I gave the right Dx's to cover testing. I also found quite a few sites that offer testing (some w/o a script) for as low as $85 for 100 foods and up. I had 6 foods tested that cost my Ins. Co. $600.

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http://www.healingna...es/allergy4.php

allergy IgG tests are questionable

I can sit here and link site after site to assure you IgG testing are legit. It's the Physicians interpratation and people eliminating the food before testing that screw it up. Example: I went 1 week Gluten Free before testing and Wheat came back 4.4 and Barley came back 6.9, the other foods 0. My Doctor said NOTHING to me but I continued going GF only to get AMAZING results. This is why me and that link suggest you get a copy of the results. Anything over zero is a allergy. BUT not according to Doctors.

I don't believe doctors. But these tests cost way too much and didn't help me at all. Even without testing everybody here knows that eliminating gluten is first thing to do if you want to get rid of acne holistically.

Here's a link to FREE @ home testing developed by a Doctor by luck. After a quick Google I found it.

http://www.care2.com/greenliving/diy-food-intolerance-allergy-test.html

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