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MonroeQT

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Posts posted by MonroeQT

  1. On July 23, 2016 at 0:43 AM, Koloz said:

    I highly doubt you're going too see young girls 14-22 dating guys with severe disfiguring acne like I just got over having. I'm still very insecure about my face and body as whole so no dating anytime soon. I have considered getting an escort.

    I was friends with a guy in high school who had horrific acne and his girlfriend at the time was a total babe. She was hands down the prettiest girl in school. Yeah, it may be the exception but this just shows anything is possible; don't give up. 
  2. 19 hours ago, OllieWickens said:

    Hello, 

    I am very concerned that my dermatologist is not going to see me in time to prescribe the next set of tablets in time. 

    I am on my first week of taking accutane (started on Monday) and tried to call today to book my next appointment in advance. I was on the line for half an hour before it went down, closing for the day until Monday. 

    Each time I've had to have an appointment with my derm, it has been such a long waiting list. I'm talking over a month after booking it. Is this still going to continue now that I am on the medication? If it is - now that I am going to be booking my appointment on Monday (25th July) - I surely wont be able to see my dermatologist before the 18th August?

    If that is the case, then what does that mean? I will have to go a couple of weeks without the tablet, which surely is not right? Wouldn't this stop my progress. 

    Perhaps now that I am actually on the tablet, the appointments will be come quicker to me? Is that the case?

    Feeling really panicked :( 

    Ok, first of all it will more than likely be ok. When I was on Accutane there were several times I was without medication. The hospital that did my labs ALWAYS forgot to send them over to my dermatologist in time, and since I am a woman, I was not allowed to get a refill until my labs were cleared. It did not impact my progress at all. Accutane(2 rounds) did not work for me long term, but I did get completely clear while on it, and stayed clear for years after each course. The reason Accutane doesn't work for me is because  my acne is caused by a hormonal imbalance(Due to PCOS, which I didn't know at the time). But, missing doses had no bearing on that.  Secondly, next time you have an appointment, make your next few appointments in advance if you can  AT THE DERMATOLOGIST. Have the office staff print out your appointment dates for you so that you know when you need to reschedule. You need to try to make your appointment at least a month in advance.
  3. 4 hours ago, snarkygirl said:
    hi, no I haven't heard of it but I definitely like to write. I will check it out. Once I did an extra credit project for a friend cause I felt sorry that she was failing.I always got great grades on essays...maybe cause I'm good at BS. Lol.
    I wanted to be a journalist or a writer but I had horrible panic disorder, even back when I hardly had any acne. I believe it had a physical cause cause since I've been on birth control and effexor I'm fine. I wrote beginnings of stories but never finished.
    As of now I still have two job interveiws this week...ones which I think I can handle. Thanks for the advice.
     
    Haha, yeah, I "helped" my husband with all of his college essays. 
  4. 28 minutes ago, Eljay said:
     
    I wasn't on BC prior to the coil (I only got it fitted as an emergency due to contraception failure and didn't want to take the MA pill).  It's a bummer because it seemed like the perfect non hormonal treatment but it's also caused me horrendous period pain and I seem to get ill with colds every time I have a period. Think I'm gonna get it taken out and see if that makes a difference, thank you for your replies! 
    Maybe you are having a reaction to the copper?? Excess copper in the body can cause acne. You may have already had high levels of copper in your system(are you a vegetarian?) and that extra amount from the IUD could have been the catalyst. Or perhaps your body recognizes the IUD as a foreign object and is trying to eliminate it, this could cause stress to your body and inflammation. That is the only other thing I can think of. I've never heard of this happening before to someone who hasn't been on a prior bc. These are just my personal theories though so defintely consult your gyno or family doctor.
  5. On July 19, 2016 at 1:35 PM, snarkygirl said:

    Hey guys...good news and bad news. 
    Good news is my skin is looking good, I'm not breaking out and I think the methods I'm using are working.
    Bad news is, despite being hired I only went to one day of work and decided I couldn't take the job. My anxiety, germophobia and mental issues got to me again.
    But tbh its wasn't a great job atIMG_20160719_142626.jpg all and I've got a few more things lined up. I'm getting a small surgery on my eyelid to remove a syringoma (??) I'm nervous about that but its supposed to be very minor. At least I have an excuse to not do anything lol.

    I'm glad to hear that your skin is doing better. Have you ever considered writing essays for college students? I know it sounds strange, but it is legal and it pays good money. My sister-in-law used to do this. She suggested it to me because I have Epilepsy. There are several organizations that you can sign up with, just google it. Essentially, you submit a sample of your writing style(this is your interview), and if the service likes it, you got the job. You pick and choose how often you want to write a paper, and what topics you want to write about. You get paid for each individual paper you write, so you don't receive an hourly wage. So a paper may be worth $100 for example. Here's how it works: College students submit what type of paper they need to write on the database, what the requirements of the paper are(300 words long, ALA format etc), then you scroll through the database of these submissions and choose which papers you want to write. Like I said, it is legal and you may want to look into it!
  6. Well, I don't think the copper IUD can CAUSE acne as it does not contain hormones, but it's not impossible. Were you on the Pill before this? If so, you are likely experiencing breakouts because certain pills(Yaz, Yasmin etc), can regulate your hormones and diminish breakouts, now that you are on a birth control method that does not regulate your hormones, it would make sense that your breakouts have increased. Of course, this theory doesn't apply to you if you weren't taking a BC pill prior to this. 

  7. 8 hours ago, Jennifer Cheung said:

    I did finish reading this book too! I do love that it has inspired me to really dramatically improve my diet. I think that no matter it's for our acne issue or overall physical or emotional health, eating healthy is always a good idea.

    While I don't regret improving my diet because I find eliminating a lot of processed food and making more healthy choices do help control the inflammation of my acne, I have to say that I'm not so sure about the supplement part. 

    In the book the author stresses heavily on the importance of having healthy gut and how it can be related to our acne, so he also recommends taking probiotics supplements - that's what I followed right away. I'm still not sure if this is the cause, but I'd been feeling more fatigued and also breaking out worse since taking it. And not long after I came off of it, I got a severe stomach flu. I just feel like maybe everybody reacts differently to supplements.

    Anyway I would still definitely recommend this book to everyone who has been struggling to take one step further to improve their diet. But then I think it is not as magical as many people would expect. After all, like the author has also noted, if the root cause of the acne is not dealt with, such as hormonal imbalance or stress, a diet can only help so much. 

    Yes, exactly. The authors make it very clear that diet won't solve everything. I do agree that supplementation can be very personal. For example, the authors make the case that omega-3s are great for inflammatory related conditions, but I know some people break out when they consume too much omega-3s. Overall, I like that the book is practical. I'm sure we've all read books or articles where the author touts that their approach will work for 99.999 percent of the population, but that is BS. We are all different, so while the advice given in the book will be beneficial to some, it may not be beneficial for others. The book acknowledges that, too. 
  8. On July 17, 2016 at 7:53 PM, ginjaxninja said:
    Hi! Thank you for the advice :) I'm gonna look on Amazon for that tea... I used to take evening primrose oil years ago for PMS... I should go back to taking it if it helps my hormones! I was never consistent in taking it so I don't know if it actually helped my PMS but it's worth trying for the acne :D do you have the link to the vitamin you take? I just joined acne.org and I don't know how to send a PM :/ 
    You're welcome. I can't post links here, but it is on Amazon. It is the "Clear Skin Vitamin Pack" by Innate Skin. 
  9. 9 hours ago, snarkygirl said:

    Hey again :)
    I may have posted this before but I'm using GREEN TEA EXTRACT+ SEA BUCKTHORN OIL at the moment and I'm very happy with the results so far . My skin is really calm and smoother. I gave up on the duac and the only thing I'm doing is washing with ground oatmeal, and using those two as a topical twice per day.
    A spot treatment that I've teied is Burt's Bees diaper cream with zinc. It really does well on red spots or spots that you've picked at . Weleda has one too.
    All of these products are vegan approved.
    The only thing I want to add in is a retinoid but that comes later.

     

    Is this a concoction you have made yourself, or is there a specific product that is formulated of those two ingredients? I'm really happy to hear you have found something that is working for you! How long have you been using it?
  10. 9 hours ago, snarkygirl said:

    Good post guys :)
    From what I understand acne has a few components: genetics, diet, certain deficiencies, inflammation and environment. And adding good food in is as important as taking bad foods out 

    Yes! There are many components that need to be taken into consideration in order to achieve homeostasis. The focus on diet isn't as restrictive as you would think. In fact, most of the "diet" is more about adding good foods and supplements. The only foods they suggest to limit are saturated fats, trans fats, excessive omega-6 fatty acids, dietary sugar, and non-fermented dairy. 
  11. Have you tried evening primrose oil? It has a similar effect on your hormones compared to Spiro, but you can buy it otc(it's a supplement). I would also suggest you purchase some organic MATCHA green tea. It is the most potent form of green tea and it has been proven to regulate hormones. You can purchase both products through Amazon. I'm currently taking the clear skin vitamin pack which contains many vitamins(including evening primrose oil) that are effective in regulating acne. Feel free to pm me for more info or advice. :) 

  12. 15 minutes ago, FvckAcne said:

    Definitely. I don't believe doctors are bad people. They're just the smaller fish in a larger system, really. I know the guy at acneeinstein wrote some stuff a long time ago about studies conducted in the 60's and what not. The chocolate studies or whatever. So it's not surprising that there's been such little progress.

    What isn't so well known is a doctor by the name of Broda Barnes. I have his book on hypothyroidism from 1976 I believe it was. In that book, he draws a connection between thyroid and acne, detailing how a 60 year old man who had acne his whole life cleared up his cystic acne covered back entirely with the administration of thyroid hormone. And that really changed my perspective on acne. So I did a lot of research on Iodine and etc. Keep in mind, this guy knew this as early as the 70s! But it really got me thinking about chemicals and herbicides and etc. and how they are endocrine disrupting agents. What also isn't so well known is that thyroid hormone has a massive number of functions in the body. It's really quite an amazing hormone - Triiodothyronine

    Yes! The thyroid was my favorite gland that we learned about in school. It's relationship with the pituitary gland is quite remarkable. Since the pituitary gland is the "master gland" of the body it is responsible for several mechanisms in the endocrine system. That book sounds really interesting. 
  13. It covers everything you have mentioned, in addition to how to regulate our hormones, the effect of stress on our skin, and inflammation in great detail with practical solutions. The prevailing theme, however, is how truly misinformed most of the medical community is(especially dermatologists). It examines the outdated studies that lead to the myth that diet has no role acne(which dermatologists still take as fact). The way the studies were conducted was abhorrent to say the least. It explains how most of what dermatologists learn about acne and diet is based on pseudoscience. The book  also examines the harm that pharmacological companies impart the medical community as a whole. I wasn't shocked when I read all of this, but I did feel validated in that what I suspected was correct. Keep in mind, this book can be revolutionary to those who have not done as much research as you and I. The dermatologists aren't purposely telling lies to their patients but they are still spreading myths regardless of intent. It is quite sad. Basically, this book reassured me that we should do our own research as well when it comes to our health. 

    Edit: I didn't see that you mentioned hormones, and stress, but I have never read a book that went into as much detail as this one so I think you would still learn a few additional things.

  14. 32 minutes ago, FvckAcne said:

    Haha yeah I wasn't logged in and shit got jacked up so I just kept editing. Sounds like a misunderstanding based on my choice of words.

    Anyways, back to the book.

    I posted this for those who still have acne (despite countless treatments), and are interested in learning about the link between acne and diet. This book makes no promises that the methodologies taught will completely clear you up. The author's emphasize that diet plays a key role in an acne patient's treatment plan, but for some it may not be enough. People with severe acne will likely need a multi-pronged approach, but diet should be part of that approach. You obviously agree with me in regards to the fact that certain cultures have better skin than those in westernized cultures. There's a reason for that. So, while we can't reverse the habits of our past, we can learn from those cultures and use healthy diet as a tool in our anti-acne arsenal. That is what the book is about. I think it's obvious that there is no one-size-fits all approach to tackling acne, so I didn't feel the need to issue a disclaimer. The book does, however, which is why you should read it(there is no possible way that I can summarize all of the contents of this book, because it would be taken out of context). It needs to be read in its entirety. 
  15. 1 hour ago, FvckAcne said:

    In no way was I attacking the book. Those first few sentences had more to do with doctors having little training in the area of nutrition and how more often they seem to simply offer prescriptions rather than ask about patient lifestyle. The first sentence in that second paragraph of the first picture you post highlights what I'm talking about.

     

    I don't quite see where you're coming from with that first sentence though. I never said the authors claimed diet is a cure all. Personally I have some family members with both type I and II diabetes. I'm aware that type I and II can be managed differently. But at the end of the day, diabetes is still an autoimmune problem. Since the immune system operates largely from the gut, the role of diet can't be underestimated in prevention.

     

    Maybe the wording was off. But it was only that first sentence I wrote that really was related to the book. But since the title of that book is “the clear skin DIET”, that's where the rest of the post comes in. This is posted in the diet & holistic health section of the forum so it's not out of place.

     

    Whether you study medicine or not is irrelavant. As it stands, neither you nor the rest of science or the medical community has a solution to the acne problem. Qualifications don't impress me, sorry.

    edit: Actually, hold up a second. I wasn't logged in for a second there and the board blocked some of your post.

    I don't think you see what I meant when I mentioned Dan. I didn't mean that it was inherited. What I mean is not genetic abuse from some prior generation or whatever. But that processed foods may be able to start the acne process rolling. And that by simply changing diet after that fact won't necessarily fix things. Maybe there's another way word it. Maybe the simplest way to put it is that our modern lifestyle can set the stage for conditions that are very hard to reverse, but don't have to be genetic e.g. dysbiosis.

    That is to say, if acne is associated with dysbiosis, and dan had acne, then mimicking a diet of people who probably don't have dysbiosis wouldn't yeild the same results.

    The paper from 1971 on the eskimos is a good example of what I mean. It was only when a modern diet was really introduced to them - with refined sugar, etc -  that the rates of acne and diabetes increased dramatically. To me, that doesn't seem like a prior generation genetic-abuse sort of thing. It's the introduction of something that wasn't there before. And with the thought of acne being associated with SIBO and the sensitivity of FODMAPs i.e. "healthy" foods also makes acne seem less like a genetic abuse scandal and more like a bacterial fermentation problem. Also, with lowered GSH and antioxidants in acne, that sounds like an infection of some kind and not genetic. Endotoxin and dysbiosis can do that by being a burden on the immune system. Because the immune system creates reactive oxygen species to deal with invading microbes, it can tax the antioxidant system.

    As a side note, that's also why omega-3's can be problematic in many cases. They are long-chain unsaturated fatty acids that are highly prone to oxidation. That spells trouble in an environment awash with free radicals. Sure, they serve a biological role in small amounts. But so far, I haven't heard of anyone curing acne with fish oil.

    The reality is that a diet full of sugar is just begging a bacterial overgrowth to happen. And that's not to mention pesticides that are probably nerve-toxic when we're talking about SIBO and lackluster gut motility.

    Is what I said about Dan a little clearer? A western diet of sugar, etc can initiate a bacterial overgrowth, but just eating differently doesn't necessarily eradicate it. Neither would probiotics, since they are bacteria themselves. And thus the thought "diet doesn't work" arises.

    However, the epigenetic angle you're coming with does have merit. And in some ways, eating corporately produced garbage can be considered a form of abuse heh.

    Stop editing lmao(I'm just as bad), Give me a second to read it.
  16. Hold on, I just read your edit, give me a chance to respond lol.

    I'm not saying that ALL acne is due to a genetic disposition. I'm saying that SOME people are predisposed to it and that there are reasons for that disposition.

    "The paper from 1971 on the eskimos is a good example of what I mean. It was only when a modern diet was really introduced to them - with refined sugar, etc -  that the rates of acne and diabetes increased dramatically. To me, that doesn't seem like a prior generation genetic-abuse sort of thing. It's the introduction of something that wasn't there before.."<<<< I agree with this completely! In fact, the book references similar studies to this one in an effort to demonstrate the acne-diet link. 

     I'm certainly not stating that anything in this book is fact, but everything discussed is based off of science and evidence. There are many factors in the manifestation of acne, and the book makes that very clear. I know the title is "the clear skin diet", but like i said the book is much more complex than what it seems. The author's address many different ways to improve acne(diet is the chief component, but not the sole component). My main point to you is that, I would like for you to read the book in context before you speak on it, because it's complex. I do really hope you buy it so we can debate it thoroughly. =)

    Edit: I see why what I said was confusing in regards to what I said about Dan/genetics. I missed a word(perhaps) so my statement should have read like this: "So you're right, perhaps he can't prevent his predisposition to acne(a result of manipulated genes over time). Have you ever considered why some diseases run in families?"

  17. 49 minutes ago, FvckAcne said:

    In no way was I attacking the book. Those first few sentences had more to do with doctors having little training in the area of nutrition and how more often they seem to simply offer prescriptions rather than ask about patient lifestyle. The first sentence in that second paragraph of the first picture you post highlights what I'm talking about.

     

    I don't quite see where you're coming from with that first sentence though. I never said the authors claimed diet is a cure all. Personally I have some family members with both type I and II diabetes. I'm aware that type I and II can be managed differently. But at the end of the day, diabetes is still an autoimmune problem. Since the immune system operates largely from the gut, the role of diet can't be underestimated in prevention.

     

    Maybe the wording was off. But it was only that first sentence I wrote that really was related to the book. But since the title of that book is “the clear skin DIET”, that's where the rest of the post comes in. This is posted in the diet & holistic health section of the forum so it's not out of place.

     

    Whether you study medicine or not is irrelavant. As it stands, neither you nor the rest of science or the medical community has a solution to the acne problem. Qualifications don't impress me, sorry.

    "We know that diet can increase one's risk for diabetes. Why couldn't the same be true for acne? So if we're looking at it that way... could diet be a “cure”? Depends on how you look at it. Yes in the sense that perhaps it could prevent the risk for diabetes. But will it cure a diabetic after they become that way? Not necessarily." You reference "cure" quite a bit, so that is why I addressed it. I'm happy to hear that you understand the different types of Diabetes, but from the statements you made, it did not appear so. I apologize. I can see that you are attempting to start a debate with me, which is great(I love debates), but a lot of what you're saying is irrelevant to a)my post and b)what the book is about. That is why I am confused as to why you initiated this debate as you have nearly no idea what the book discusses(aside from my brief description and the title). You can't really begin a debate without ALL of the information(well, you can but it doesn't make much sense). If you had read the book, then tried to debate some of the points, I could understand your position. You have ingested a very small amount of information that is out of context from the entirety of the book. I would love to debate with you after you have consumed all of the information that the book outlines. Also, I only stated I study medicine to prove my credibility since I was speaking on the topic of disease(specifically Diabetes). Your credibility lies in the fact that you have family members with Diabetes, mine is through study and application; make sense? Trust me, I'm not attempting to impress anyone. Haha. I simply wanted to share a resource with the community here. It may or may not be helpful, but it should not be judged before it is even read. I'm not going to continue to debate though, that was not the purpose of this post. Have a wonderful evening.
  18. 3 hours ago, FvckAcne said:

    The book seems to be right in the sense that nutrition for the most part is almost disregarded as a factor in health. Everybody seems to think problems are all genetic. And they certainly can be. But you can't underestimate the role of how someone is raised and their habits in terms of what they're eating.

     

    There's a LOT to say here... but I think the confusion around why traditional diets seem to work for primitive people but not us stems partly from not recognizing that they live that way their whole lives. In other words, they are never really exposed to a modern diet. That's not the same as someone who has eaten a modern diet, had dysbiosis and then developed acne. Changing your lifestyle after the fact doesn't automatically fix everything.

     

    We can't expect the same results as them because it's not the same.

     

    For example... Dan of this site once wrote a post outlining his attempts to eat a traditional diet like those acne-less societies but he found that his situation didn't change. It's easy for people to conclude that diet is not the cure or could prevent acne. What people might fail to realize here is that he already had acne. He already had the disease. It's subtle but very important to see that.

     

    It's still very possible that diet could prevent or be the cure for acne. But perhaps before acne takes root. You should start a healthy diet and live a good life from day 1, not after the fact. Prevention is the cure for modern maladies, not treatment.

     

    Maybe the role that diet serves is to keep the microbiota in tact and in that way prevents acne in those populations. But it's important to realize that if we've lost microbial diversity in our gut ecosystems, changing diet won't fix that necessarily. It's good to eat better, but you won't be feeding species that aren't there. The modern diet can be a one-way street in that sense in that you could lose diversity, but then changing diet after doesn't make them spontaneously reappear or regain the foothold they once had.

     

    In trying to make this as short of a post as possible, let's just draw a quick parallel. Take diabetes for instance. Even if a diabetic changes their diet, they're still diabetic, right? Point is, we tend to think of acne as being somehow different from other diseases of civilization that entail chronic inflammation and the like. Having a diabetic simply eat better after they become diabetic doesn't just make the beta cells of the pancreas grow back. In the case of acne, we tend to assume that if we just change our diet, then acne will disappear. And chances are it just doesn't work like that.

     

    We know that diet can increase one's risk for diabetes. Why couldn't the same be true for acne? So if we're looking at it that way... could diet be a “cure”? Depends on how you look at it. Yes in the sense that perhaps it could prevent the risk for diabetes. But will it cure a diabetic after they become that way? Not necessarily.

     

    So diet could be both a yes and no answer for a “cure”. I know that sounds confusing, but give it some thought.

     

    Of course it's not actually known the true hard scientific answer as to the precise cause of acne. But whatever it is, those primitive people seem to have it on lockdown, and the thing that most boldly stands out for them is their utter absence from the modern food systems of the world. Remember what I said though about their adherence all along. Being reactive is different than being proactive. The difference between prevention and treatment.

     

    It's also interesting to note that for one of those groups, they exhibit no signs of either acne OR diabetes.

     

    Here are some pictures of them. What's amazing is that this woman is wearing no makeup or anything of the sort. They simply don't have access to acne medications or things of that nature. When they say no acne, they mean it!

     

    1.png

    2.png

    3.png

    4.png.png

    You make some good points, however the author's never claim that diet is a cure-all. If you read the book, you would have known that. That being said, the authors certainly make the case that diet(this includes vitamin supplementation) can significantly improve acne. Combine an adequate diet  with a good skincare regime and many people can expect clear skin. The two components work synergistically. I'm glad you mentioned Diabetes. While what you have stated has merit in regards to Type I Diabetes, Type II Diabetes is much different in regards to the role diet/lifestyle plays in managing the disease. In fact, those with type II diabetes can completely eradicate the need for  medication through healthy eating and lifestyle choices. Will they still be Diabetic? Of course. Will they have the symptoms of one? No(unless they stop managing their disease). The point is, most diseases can be managed, including acne. In respect to your example about Dan, the book provides evidence on how genes are affected and manipulated due to dietary abuse in prior generations. So you're right, perhaps he can't prevent his predisposition to acne(a result of manipulated genes over time). Have you ever considered why some diseases run in families? That is part of the reason why. Of course, I am simplifying all of this for the sake of time, but the book explains it in great depth, if you wish to read it. Btw,  I study medicine so I am well-versed in the mechanisms and treatments of many diseases. Thank you for your input, though. Read the book, and I promise your preconceived notions will change. =) It's really much more complex than the title implies.
  19. Hey everyone! I implore everyone still struggling with acne to check out the e-book, "The Clear Skin Diet." I bought mine through the Kindle App(go on Amazon if you don't have the kindle app)and I am currently reading it now. I am only a few chapters in and my eyes have already been completely opened. It is 10 bucks and, trust me, it's worth it. So far, I have learned that dermatologists are rarely taught about clinical nutrition(so how can they tell us that acne is not related to diet)?! Presently,  I'm learning about the benefits of Omega-3's(fish-oil in particular)and why/how they help acne. I've also learned why other cultures never experience acne, and it has nothing to do with ethnicity; it is because they consume a diet drastically different than the typical westernized diet. I'm not trying to scam anyone here. Those who have seen my posts  know that I am credible, and that I try to give advice whenever I can, and that I myself am struggling with acne once again after two rounds of Accutane. I have NEVER made a post like this before, but I think it would be a crime not to share this book that has an extensive wealth of knowledge with you all. Everything in the book is backed by scientific reasoning and relevant studies. It is written by Dermatologists who know what they're talking about. If you have tried everything else, and still don't understand why you have acne(despite eating "healthy"), you really have nothing to lose by spending another 10 bucks. I've included a few screen shots from the e-book that are relevant as to why most dermatologists don't believe in the acne-diet connection. Enjoy!

    image.png

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  20. On July 2, 2016 at 2:29 AM, anniebittlestone said:

    Hi, it's my first time posting on here so here goes nothing! You are gonna think I'm an idiot here but a couple of months ago I tried the toothbrush technique to get rid of blackheads on my chin and nose. BAD IDEA. For days my chin was scabbed over and oozing blood and a clear liquid. It was the same with my nose but it died down quicker and only left a small mark of hyperpigmentation that I just call a burn. On the other hand, even four months on my chin has a permanent scar on the crease and I have lots of white heads and blackheads that have turned into painful pimples all over my chin. I have tried EVERYTHING  but nothing gets rid of them. My chin is permanently red and spotty, it's really getting me down. I'm going on holiday next week where I can't wear make up to cover it (it's even difficult to cover) PLEASE HELP preferably home remedies or things that I might already have THANKYOU!image.jpeg

    Your acne is not even close to being severe. I second the aspirin spot treatment. Add a drop of water to an aspirin and once it turns into a paste, put it directly on your spots for as long as you wish(I suggest leaving it on overnight). 
  21. 8 hours ago, BenderFan said:
    I have had some pretty bad anxiety for a while actually. And I'm supossed to be taking Klonopin for it. I haven't in a few days though.

    But with the breathing thing, thinking back to a few days ago I think it might have actually started a few days before taking the Accutane, the Accutane just made it worse for that night. 

    I was already having some sort of mysterious trouble breathing and getting oxygen but with the Accutane added on, sitting wrong or any physical exertion/extended standing made me kinda winded and my heart was going faster. 
    Well, with that many factors at play it's best you take a break for now. What has your doctor said thus far? 
  22. On June 25, 2016 at 10:38 PM, Stina123 said:

    I got really bad acne starting in March because of a bipolar medication (pretty positive). I had some before that around my period but never that bad. Then it just blew up....I would get recurring little red bumps around my temples and clogged pores, blackheads, red bumps on my cheeks. Sometimes it would even look rashy? I've tried otc products, clindamycin, duac, benzoyl peroxide, salycilic acid, diet changes, drinking plenty of water, minocycline, etc. I was prescribed tretinoin but heard it can make your face even oilier, which is dumb because it's supposed to fix that. I tried it and got nervous so stopped. My face gets extremely oily lately and I can't figure out the culprit. I can see each pore of my nose with a bead of oil 1 minute after washing my face. I do not like my dermatologist because she rushes me out of there and doesn't look at the root cause of my acne or even try to. I go to a new Derm on Thursday but will be seeing a PA. I've never had cystic acne, but have been getting acne where I never have before like my eyebrows, under my eyes closer to my nose, my nose...it could be hormones, something wrong with my digestive system (in fact I know that's not working correctly). I'm really tired of trying things that might not work. I know everything about accutane and am willing to take it. I guess I wouldn't tell the dermatologist about my bipolar...is it at all possible that I could get it? Also, my acne has been MUCH worse than what the pictures show. These are very recent and some are of my acne getting better. It fluctuates like crazy.

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    Ok first of all, you need to tell your derm you are bipolar. If you're already on medication for it, then you should be fine if they think you're a good candidate for Accutane. Secondly, how old are you? Have you tried EVERYTHING else? Accutane should be the LAST resort. Your acne is very mild, and I would hate for you to acquire a permanent side effect from Accutane when there might be other options out there for you. Considering that your acne is very mild, you have a good chance of getting clear with another method. My acne was beyond terrible, and I had to go on Accutane twice. I exhausted all other options available to me at the time, and it truly was my last resort. I'm thankful that Accutane was able to clear my skin for the short term, but I do have permanent side effects now. I have IBS, chronically itchy and dry skin, and dry eyes now as a result. Definitely see your derm, but try to discuss other options first before you go down this path. 
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