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UnacceptedRealist

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About UnacceptedRealist

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  1. Honestly, I'd probably be willing to give up everything passed 40. So, assuming a fairly average lifespan, like 38 years or so.
  2. Yes, but not toward people who had nothing to do with my suffering. Seeing people enjoy life doesn't bother me. I can honestly say, though, that I doubt I'll ever experience true happiness again. It's just not who I am anymore.
  3. I'm certainly not religious, but I can't help but think that there's no reason why a "god" has to be benevolent. In fact, IMO, the options are that there's no god or that there is a god and it's evil. I'm not sure that acne should count as evidence either way, though.
  4. Coming from someone with scarring as severe as I've ever seen, I'd support this for the sake of others -- but I wouldn't personally want anything to do with it. I've never used anti-anxiety medication and, quite frankly, I don't care what other people think of me. I think it's important to acknowledge that, while we're certainly at a disadvantage in many regards, we ultimately decide how acne/scarring impacts our lives. And I've found that there's no better remedy for acne's social implicat
  5. I'm not really sure how to phrase this question most appropriately; I've had a number of well-intentioned discussions with people IRL about it and they usually get offended/defensive pretty quick (I've actually been asked to leave a church-based counseling session). So, to be clear, I don't mean to offend anyone; I'm just genuinely curious: Why is parenthood considered such an inalienable right? In other words, why is it considered so unreasonable to question the fitness of potential paren
  6. To be honest, if I were in your position, I likely would not have pursued a relationship in the first place. However, now that you've made that decision, it's no longer simply about what you want or feel you need -- you need to base decisions on "what's best for us?" Hence, I think you should definitely not "just go ahead and do it." In my opinion, it would be much more responsible to talk to your significant other about how you're feeling. Then, with consideration for her feelings on the matte
  7. Well, although I have nothing against positivity, I think it's important not to generalize the effects of acne. For many, there's no hope for a day when they're "finally clear," as they've already been left with scarring (which can be quite severe). So, while I agree that most people will be different post-acne, I don't think the positive-to-negative change ratio is always in their favor.
  8. I doubt your new civilization would be any different. The issue isn't that people think acne is a "contagious cancer"; it's that acne is a skin issue -- in other words, it's an objectively unappealing trait. For this reason, I don't think most people need to "learn" anything; they're already correct: people with acne are, to some extent, aesthetically unappealing.
  9. Quite simply, because "society" doesn't understand it. Generally speaking, people only care about things they've been forced to understand through personal experience. And, to be honest, I think this site is a great example of this -- people often use their own experience with acne as a basis for their overall opinion about it. They're quick to demean acne by either comparing it to more "serious" conditions or by offering simple means of treating it. Around here you may not hear things like
  10. Well, considering I've never been in a relationship, I'll take your word for anything relationship-related. As for my skin limiting what I can do, that's not necessarily what I meant. I'm sure it doesn't help my career aspirations, but what I meant was, actually, who I become -- not what I do. My scarring is severe enough that it is very noticeable and I can attempt to hide it (which I don't see myself doing...), but realistically I can't rid myself of it. That's tough for me because I have
  11. You're right and I didn't mean to imply that I thought everyone (or anyone, for that matter) shared my views.
  12. Thanks for the kind words. I'd rather not detail exactly what I don't like about my appearance; but, basically, I have acne and relatively severe acne scarring. Also, I don't think my skin completely characterizes who I am, but it certainly limits who I can become. It's just reality, appearances matter to most people (myself included) and there's just not much I can do about what I look like. I guess, honestly, I don't want to be happy just to be happy. I'm not happy about how I look; I'll
  13. In theory, I agree -- being positive is usually a good thing. But, in reality, I just can't convince myself that it's practical; it's extremely difficult for me to be genuinely positive about my appearance because I'm constantly reminded of what I really look like (and trust me, I don't have 'moderate' acne) -- be it mirrors or talking to people who can't make eye contact. I have, however, tried to circumvent this issue by improving areas of my appearance that I can control, and, to some exten
  14. I think you're right. I lack the willingness to view myself more favorably than I would someone else in my situation (or, as you put it, coping mechanisms). That said, functioning on a day-to-day basis is not a struggle for me, and I don't think I need to boost my sense of self-worth. This, I think, is because my "low self-esteem" is confined to a specific component of my life -- intimate relationships. I don't suffer from an overall lack of self-confidence or an inability to discern my weak
  15. I appreciate all the thoughtful replies, guys. And I partially agree with the consensus; specifically, I do think that my self-esteem is 'low' (or at least lower than usual...), but I don't think I suffer from a "self-esteem issue." I guess it depends on your definition of an 'issue', but, in my opinion, my self-esteem -- or lack thereof -- is appropriate. It's the acne, and the other of acne-related ailments, that are the issue. And in my case, many of those issues aren't going anywhere (I
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