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a la mode

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About a la mode

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  1. I did watch the video with the testimonials about the people getting treated and he's trying to defend himself about his questionable procedures (marketing/word-of-mouth, etc). In the movie he's behaving like a con-artist trying to explain himself out of a ponzi scheme he made. You see stuff like that enough and you can pick it out right away. I'm not mad, but people need to seriously think about these cure-all 100% effective cancer (or any other serious and/or life-threatening) treatments. It
  2. The "cure for cancer" is a bit of a misnomer. There are many different kinds of cancers, and a "cure" is technically a removal (surgical or chemotherapy) of a tumor and the cancer never coming back. As for the Burzynski Clinic, where's the proof that he cured/ended all and of the worst cancers? That's one helluva claim to make to 100% cure every single cancer under the sun without any or little side effects. He better back it up. So far, he's only offered testimonials (this DOES NOT count as evi
  3. The "cure for cancer" is a bit of a misnomer. There are many different kinds of cancers, and a "cure" is technically a removal (surgical or chemotherapy) of a tumor and the cancer never coming back. As for the Burzynski Clinic, where's the proof that he cured/ended all and of the worst cancers? That's one helluva claim to make to 100% cure every single cancer under the sun without any or little side effects. He better back it up. So far, he's only offered testimonials (this DOES NOT count as evi
  4. The drug was either too difficult to process/synthesize/extract or they found out in later testing that the drug WASN'T as great as they thought it was (usually it's about causing liver damage in people). A vast majority of tested drugs don't make it to FDA approval for these reasons. For example, Hoodia (for obesity) was dropped by Pfizer and Unilever because it was difficult to process, and a study later found out that the herb didn't work and caused liver damage.
  5. @ AO: I think it was the AlgaeCal brand that was made from oyster shell it, but lead has been found in both coral calcium and regular calcium. If you keep track of the FDA recalls and look at the Consumer Labs and Consumer Reports tests, you'll find that green tea, black cohosh, ginger, ginseng, St. Johns wort and plenty of the most popular supplements have a tendency of contamination. And yes, testing safety is for the most part voluntary. As with natural detoxing agents, my dad told me a w
  6. You really have a lot of questions, FSAS. Not that it's a bad thing. I'll try to get to your other posts and questions, but I have a chaotic schedule now. To put it short, increased androgens cause and/or worsen acne. Inhibiting androgen production can therefore decrease acne. The reason why acne can "suddenly" appear at a later age is kind of the same reason why some women get their first period at 18--usually genetics-related. Diseases and hormones can act strangely, going away and coming
  7. I have high anxiety, and it causes me to pick my face A LOT. Does this happen to you? (Maybe that's why it's so severe because of unconscious picking?)
  8. It's a strong possibility that the lead is coming from the supplements you're taking. The supplement industry is so very poorly regulated, and companies really don't have to prove their supplements are safe. Contamination is still very much a problem, especially with herbs/herbal supplements/Ayurvedic medicines (A report here.) Also: Hair analysis tests are bogus, and no one can diagnose anything from this kind of test. (A meta-analysis here, and a well-written article about the subject here
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