Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
KancerStick

Im megadosing vitamin C and im loving it

Recommended Posts

Posted

I ran into a friend of mine who i have not seen for almost 4 years...

she used to have extremely cystic acne all over her face / neck

to my surprise....no suprise is not the correct adjective .. id say more like flabbergasted...her skins was freking clear as hell and no sight of scars at all....

she said that she took 5-8 grams of vitamin C and a multivitamin everyday....and it cured her acne..which is freking nuts...

ive been taking 6 grams a day and for some reason my face is not red anymore and my current hyperpigmentations are healing / fading quick....

ive broken out with 1 small whitehead on my forehead since i started the vitamin c megadose.

im guessings its the powerful antioxidants in the vitamin c thats making acne go byby...

plus i read that taking 10 grams a day is not harmful at all with vitamin C

Start taking some extra vitamin C, youll feel great!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

i take 500mg a day as it states on the bottle

however i started taking another in the evening making it 1000mg and i didnt notice any downsides

i might continue this and see what happens

my capsules are zinc+vit c

both great for skin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

What About Vitamin C and Kidney Stones?

Stephen Lawson

LPI Adminstrative Officer

For many years, experts have speculated that the intake of large amounts of vitamin C may contribute to the formation of oxalate-type kidney stones because of the metabolic conversion of vitamin C to oxalic acid. If the amount of oxalic acid in the urine increases as the dose of vitamin C increases, they reasoned, then a prolonged intake of large amounts of vitamin C may cause kidney stones. Some experimental evidence supports this concern. For instance, Dr. Constance Tsao, formerly with the Linus Pauling Institute of Science and Medicine, published two studies in the 1980s that investigated the relationship between vitamin C and oxalic acid. In one study, Dr. Tsao demonstrated that doses of 3-10 grams/day of vitamin C taken by ten subjects for 2-10 years did not result in abnormal levels of oxalic acid in the blood. In the other study, however, she showed that the ingestion of 10 grams/day of vitamin C by six subjects resulted in slightly elevated levels of oxalic acid in the urine, although the amount was within the range obtained by the consumption of normal diets. In contrast, a study with six subjects published in 1996 by Dr. Mark Levine and colleagues at the National Institutes of Health found that increasing the daily intake of vitamin C from 200 mg to 1,000 mg resulted in an increase in urinary oxalic acid of about 30%. Consequently, Dr. Levine suggested that the "upper safe doses of vitamin C are less than 1,000 mg daily in healthy people", although he noted that several earlier studies had not found any association between the incidence of kidney stones and the regular daily intake of 1,000 mg or more of vitamin C.

Dr. Carol Johnston of Arizona State University published an article in Nutrition Reviews in March in which she reviewed the scientific and medical evidence that might allow the establishment of an "upper intake level" for vitamin C. She examined the evidence on "rebound scurvy", kidney stones, hemolytic anemia in patients with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency, enhanced iron absorption, pro-oxidant effects, and the destruction of vitamin B12. She noted that the experimental, clinical, and epidemiological evidence does not support a detrimental role for vitamin C in any of these conditions, although we still do not know the effect of large amounts of vitamin C in people with hemochromatosis, or iron-overload disease. Her analysis is in agreement with the many other reviews of the safety of supplemental vitamin C. Dr. Johnston concludes that "the available data indicate that very high intakes of vitamin C (2-4 g/day) are well tolerated biologically in healthy mammalian systems. Currently, strong scientific evidence to define and defend a UL [Tolerable Upper Intake Level] for vitamin C is not available." In other words, we cannot establish a threshold of toxicity for vitamin C.

To this evidence, we can add another recently published study by Dr. Gary Curhan and colleagues at Harvard, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, and Massachusetts General Hospital. For 14 years, Dr. Curhan et al. followed a group of 85,557 women with no prior history of kidney stones. Their intake of vitamin B6 and vitamin C was assessed and correlated with the development of stones. Daily intakes of 40 mg or more of vitamin B6 provided significant protection against the formation of stones, but there was no significant difference in stone formation between the groups with the lowest (less than 250 mg/day) and highest (1,500 mg/day or more) intake of vitamin C. In a previous study of a group of over 45,000 men followed for 6 years, the authors found a protective role for vitamin C but not for vitamin B6. They conclude, "...our findings for vitamin C, which have been consistent for women and men, do not support the practice of routine restriction of vitamin C to prevent kidney stones." Addressing previous experimental studies that associated vitamin C with increased urinary oxalate (the salt of oxalic acid), the authors point to another study from 1994, which showed that vitamin C is easily converted to oxalate during analytical procedures. Therefore, the increased amounts of oxalate observed in urine may have been artifactually produced and have no relation to what happens in the body.

The accumulated evidence demonstrates that vitamin C, even in large amounts, is a remarkably safe substance. This evidence strongly supports the role of vitamin C as an important antioxidant, not a pro-oxidant. While we know that the relatively small amount of 100-200 mg/day provides substantial protection against age-related diseases, including heart disease, cancer, and cataract, and that a still smaller amount prevents scurvy, we do not yet know the optimal amount of vitamin C (see "The Optimal Intake of Vitamin C" by Stephen Lawson, LPI Newsletter Spring/Summer 1997). Large doses of vitamin C have been shown to be of therapeutic benefit in promoting relaxation of the arteries (vasodilation), which benefits patients with heart disease and "coronary risk factors", such as diabetes, high serum cholesterol levels, and high serum homocysteine levels. Large doses of vitamin C are also useful in combating viral infections, preventing toxemia in pregnant women (possibly through vasodilation), and as an adjunct to the appropriate conventional treatment of cancer. There is also a tremendous amount of anecdotal evidence and some clinical evidence that vitamin C may be of benefit in treating other illnesses and conditions. The difficulty of determining the optimal intake of vitamin C is due to its many different functions in the body, biochemical individuality, and the impracticability of measuring the vitamin C content of various tissues and organs in healthy people in order to correlate those amounts with blood levels and optimal function.

Over twenty years ago, Linus Pauling proposed that the RDA for vitamin C should be increased to 200 mg/day. At about the same time, he mustered theoretical and experimental arguments to support his belief at that time that the optimal intake for humans is about 2 grams/day. While the merits of ingesting that much vitamin C or more each day are debatable, at least we can be confident that large doses are not harmful for healthy people and may be of therapeutic benefit in many cases. In particular, the concern about the role of vitamin C in kidney stone formation, a source of speculation for several decades, appears to be no longer justified.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

good thread jay!

so there we go

dont over-do it with the Vit C !

cheer man

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

I ran into a friend of mine who i have not seen for almost 4 years...

she used to have extremely cystic acne all over her face / neck

to my surprise....no suprise is not the correct adjective .. id say more like flabbergasted...her skins was freking clear as hell and no sight of scars at all....

she said that she took 5-8 grams of vitamin C and a multivitamin everyday....and it cured her acne..which is freking nuts...

ive been taking 6 grams a day and for some reason my face is not red anymore and my current hyperpigmentations are healing / fading quick....

ive broken out with 1 small whitehead on my forehead since i started the vitamin c megadose.

im guessings its the powerful antioxidants in the vitamin c thats making acne go byby...

plus i read that taking 10 grams a day is not harmful at all with vitamin C

Start taking some extra vitamin C, youll feel great!

It doesn't give you diarrhea?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...757C0A96E958260

Those who think that if a little vitamin C is good, more must be better should think again, says a team of British researchers, who found that a supplement of 500 milligrams a day could damage people's genes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

It's better to get vitamin C in whole foods with all it's naturally occuring cofactors needed to help it be utilized by the body. This is ESPECIALLY true with vitamin C because large doses of the isolated vitamin can leech out other things in the body that you don't want leeched.

A good solution to this is get acerola powder, which comes from a cherry that is one of the highest known sources of vitamin C.

Acerola can be found growing wild and under cultivation on the sandy soils throughout north-eastern Brazil. It is native to northern South America, Central America, and Jamaica, Florida and Texas. The fruit of the Acerola Cherry tree, Malpighia punicifolia L. is rich in Vitamin C and carotenoids, with the cherry-like fruits being one of the richest known natural sources of vitamin C. The fresh fruit can contain up to 4000 mg Vitamin C per gram of fresh weight. Oranges provide 500 to 4,000 parts per million Vitamin C or ascorbic acid, while Acerola assays in the range of 16,000 to 172,000 parts per million.

ANTIOXIDANT - Acerola's use is mostly associated with its high content of vitamin C and the synergistic bioflavonoids- rutin and hesperidin, providing one of nature's most potent antioxidants.

IMMUNE SUPPORT - Acerola is an ideal food based source of nutrients necessary for immune support. Acerola is a rich source of vitamin C, bioflavonoids, carotenoids, and other vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients providing ideal synergy for immune cell function.

NUTRITIVE - Compared to oranges, acerola provides twice as much magnesium, pantothenic acid, and potassium. Other vitamins present include vitamin A (4,300 to 12,500 IU/100 g, compared to approximately 11,000 IU for raw carrots), thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin in concentrations comparable to those in other fruits. One hundred and fifty other constituents have been identified in acerola; the major ones being furfural, hexadecanoic acid, and limonene. Acerola cherries are an excellent source of powerful antioxidants and are also rich in protein and mineral salts principally, iron, calcium and phosphorus.

SKIN TONIC - Recent research in cosmetology indicates that vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and free radical scavenger for the skin as well, and acerola extracts are now appearing in skin care products that fight cellular aging. In addition to its vitamin content, acerola contains mineral salts that have shown to aid in the re-mineralisation of tired and stressed skin, while the mucilage and proteins have skin hydrating properties and promote capillary conditioning.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

It's better to get vitamin C in whole foods with all it's naturally occuring cofactors needed to help it be utilized by the body. This is ESPECIALLY true with vitamin C because large doses of the isolated vitamin can leech out other things in the body that you don't want leeched.

A good solution to this is get acerola powder, which comes from a cherry that is one of the highest known sources of vitamin C.

Acerola can be found growing wild and under cultivation on the sandy soils throughout north-eastern Brazil. It is native to northern South America, Central America, and Jamaica, Florida and Texas. The fruit of the Acerola Cherry tree, Malpighia punicifolia L. is rich in Vitamin C and carotenoids, with the cherry-like fruits being one of the richest known natural sources of vitamin C. The fresh fruit can contain up to 4000 mg Vitamin C per gram of fresh weight. Oranges provide 500 to 4,000 parts per million Vitamin C or ascorbic acid, while Acerola assays in the range of 16,000 to 172,000 parts per million.

ANTIOXIDANT - Acerola's use is mostly associated with its high content of vitamin C and the synergistic bioflavonoids- rutin and hesperidin, providing one of nature's most potent antioxidants.

IMMUNE SUPPORT - Acerola is an ideal food based source of nutrients necessary for immune support. Acerola is a rich source of vitamin C, bioflavonoids, carotenoids, and other vitamins, minerals and phytonutrients providing ideal synergy for immune cell function.

NUTRITIVE - Compared to oranges, acerola provides twice as much magnesium, pantothenic acid, and potassium. Other vitamins present include vitamin A (4,300 to 12,500 IU/100 g, compared to approximately 11,000 IU for raw carrots), thiamine, riboflavin, and niacin in concentrations comparable to those in other fruits. One hundred and fifty other constituents have been identified in acerola; the major ones being furfural, hexadecanoic acid, and limonene. Acerola cherries are an excellent source of powerful antioxidants and are also rich in protein and mineral salts principally, iron, calcium and phosphorus.

SKIN TONIC - Recent research in cosmetology indicates that vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant and free radical scavenger for the skin as well, and acerola extracts are now appearing in skin care products that fight cellular aging. In addition to its vitamin content, acerola contains mineral salts that have shown to aid in the re-mineralisation of tired and stressed skin, while the mucilage and proteins have skin hydrating properties and promote capillary conditioning.

The downside is if you're megadosing with acerola powder, it'll be hard on your wallet. But just a little tip, I know no one really listens to my shit because it's way farther 'out there' then most would be willing to go.

I'll take it a step further. Check out the ingredients to my multivitamin:

http://www.xtend-life.com/product_detail.p...id=1&menu_id=15

I wish something like consumerlabs.com would review them.

But no amount of pills can beat a healthy diet. People go on and on about vitamin C or vitamin A, when there's dirt cheap antioxidants that have many more health benefits. Like green tea:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=146

An enormous list of health benefits with references to scientific studies to support it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

I ran into a friend of mine who i have not seen for almost 4 years...

she used to have extremely cystic acne all over her face / neck

to my surprise....no suprise is not the correct adjective .. id say more like flabbergasted...her skins was freking clear as hell and no sight of scars at all....

she said that she took 5-8 grams of vitamin C and a multivitamin everyday....and it cured her acne..which is freking nuts...

ive been taking 6 grams a day and for some reason my face is not red anymore and my current hyperpigmentations are healing / fading quick....

ive broken out with 1 small whitehead on my forehead since i started the vitamin c megadose.

im guessings its the powerful antioxidants in the vitamin c thats making acne go byby...

plus i read that taking 10 grams a day is not harmful at all with vitamin C

Start taking some extra vitamin C, youll feel great!

Kaner, When did you first start taking vitamin c 6grams?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...757C0A96E958260

Those who think that if a little vitamin C is good, more must be better should think again, says a team of British researchers, who found that a supplement of 500 milligrams a day could damage people's genes.

ROTFLMAO!!

Yeah, right...

It's better to get vitamin C in whole foods with all it's naturally occuring cofactors needed to help it be utilized by the body. This is ESPECIALLY true with vitamin C because large doses of the isolated vitamin can leech out other things in the body that you don't want leeched.

Really? Like what? Please be specific.

BTW, I should mention here that I've been taking vitamin C supplements for longer than most people here have been alive. ;) I started around 1970, so that would be...about 36 years! :shock:

Just as important (or even MORE important) than the absolute daily amount you take is how OFTEN you take it throughout the day. I strongly recommend taking small amounts several times a day. Currently, I buy cheap 250 mg tablets from my local supermarket and snap them in half (they're scored down the middle, so it's absurdly easy to do that). I take a half-tablet (125 mg) about four times a day. That total daily dose is only 500 mg, which nobody in their right minds nowadays would really consider to be a "mega-dose". But vitamin C levels will be maintaind evenly throughout the day with such a simple and inexpensive regimen.

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html...757C0A96E958260

Those who think that if a little vitamin C is good, more must be better should think again, says a team of British researchers, who found that a supplement of 500 milligrams a day could damage people's genes.

ROTFLMAO!!

Yeah, right...

Any reason you believe otherwise? The source is the New York Times, which isn't perfect I suppose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Look, 500 mg/day of vitamin C isn't even near the level that animals (non-primate animals) naturally produce in their own bodies. How reasonable do YOU think it is that the alleged "genetic damage" from that little bit of the vitamin is of ANY significance whatsoever to humans?? :D

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

there are much stronger antioxidants then vitamin c, like the ones in green tea and lipoic acid... maybe those are better alternatives

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

how can 500mg a day be damaging to your health when you can walk into a store and buy bottles of 1000mg?!

i just bought a bottle of 'once daily' 1000mg tablets. im planning to take quite a few a day though lol. heres to me getting rid of my redmarks, to be taken down later in life by cancer or something caused by megadosing!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

there are much stronger antioxidants then vitamin c, like the ones in green tea and lipoic acid... maybe those are better alternatives

The secret to an effective antioxidant regimen is to have moderate levels of as wide a variety of different antioxidants as possible, since they have synergistic properties.

how can 500mg a day be damaging to your health when you can walk into a store and buy bottles of 1000mg?!

Maybe for the same reason that you can walk into stores and buy CIGARETTES! ;)

But seriously, I don't understand how the critics out there can warn against the supposedly dire consequences of taking supplemental vitamin C, when common animals synthesize their own vitamin C at gram levels every day (adjusted to human weight levels). "Genetic damage", my butt.

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

there are much stronger antioxidants then vitamin c, like the ones in green tea and lipoic acid... maybe those are better alternatives

The secret to an effective antioxidant regimen is to have moderate levels of as wide a variety of different antioxidants as possible, since they have synergistic properties.

how can 500mg a day be damaging to your health when you can walk into a store and buy bottles of 1000mg?!

Maybe for the same reason that you can walk into stores and buy CIGARETTES! ;)

But seriously, I don't understand how the critics out there can warn against the supposedly dire consequences of taking supplemental vitamin C, when common animals synthesize their own vitamin C at gram levels every day (adjusted to human weight levels). "Genetic damage", my butt.

Bryan

maybe all the vitamin C helps bc it helps you absorb iron. Iron is needed to help heal wounds...and it is absorbed better when vitamin C is taken at same time. So eat greens w the C

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

I'm interested in this...I only take maybe 160mg of vitamin C a day.

But I do know that excess vitamin C can induce hemochromatosis...but I might need more vitamin C since I exercise now.

I'm also interested in healing some of the scars that I have. They are pretty mild so I'm hoping maybe someone with experience will detail if vitamin C helped "plump" their indented scars.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

I'm interested in this...I only take maybe 160mg of vitamin C a day.

But I do know that excess vitamin C can induce hemochromatosis...but I might need more vitamin C since I exercise now.

I'm also interested in healing some of the scars that I have. They are pretty mild so I'm hoping maybe someone with experience will detail if vitamin C helped "plump" their indented scars.

I had some mild rolling scars (nothing bad). I started on Vitamin C and MSM a few times a day (probably ended up being a few grams) and I saw a pretty surprising improvement. It's worth a shot.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

KanserStick!

For how long have you been taking vitamin C?

Has anyone noticed getting drier skin with vit C? My skin is so dry that it feals like it´s gong to break so I couldn´t stand it if it got even dryer! I remember that it got dry from drinking lemonjuice every day.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

im such a retard. i forgot my vit c tablets were 1000mg already and have been chugging them down thinking they wer 500mg. so in essence for the past 4 days ive been having about 8 grams of vit C. oops. im gnna die lol

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

im was thinking of tryin vitC for red marks, until i read there now that it can do some thing with hemochromatosis, im already a carrier of the gene so should i really not try this? :eh:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

I've been loving eating tonnes of my chewable delicious vitamin C tablets the last few days. I mainly eat them because i heart the flavour, but also because they are good for me. Prolly pointless seeing as i eat tonnes of oranges and mandarins, but mehhhhhhh

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

My step grandfather takes 25 grams. Yes that is 25,000 mg. To me that is way too much of anything, water soluble, antioxidant, etc. or not. As bryan said if you take vitamin c, split it up in your day. Do that with B vitamins as well. The 500 mg thing inducing gene damage sounds like bs. But I would not be surprised if very high doses cause other problems (throughout history "safe" things have always turned out to have problems attached to them). And I believe high doses of vitamin c probably causes other problems than "loose stools and an upset stomach". Of course I have no proof though. I don't know about vitamin c inducing hemochromatosis. Iron supplements have been shown to do that, especially those with the recessive gene though. Vitamin C only aids in absorption, just because you take a lot of it doesn't mean you will overload your body with iron.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

I don't know about vitamin c inducing hemochromatosis. Iron supplements have been shown to do that, especially those with the recessive gene though. Vitamin C only aids in absorption, just because you take a lot of it doesn't mean you will overload your body with iron.

The thing about iron is that the body has no outlet for it. The RDA for iron is 18mg. To be safe, I would cut it to 50%, so 9mg/day while on such high vitamin C intake. The body regulates iron uptake very strictly in most people, but it's not like water or b vitamins and vitamin c where excess is excreted...iron doesn't do that in the human body.

But I'll probably need more iron since I'm exercising now (about 4-6 hours a week).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Posted

Anyone still trying this? Any updates?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a New Account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×