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Anyone had an initial breakout from probiotics?

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Or is that just silly? The one I just bought is lactobacillus acidophilus and bifidobacterium lactis. I think it may be doing more harm than good. Anyone know?

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I had quite the opposite effect from probiotics. Probiotics can only do more harm than good if you have intestinal problems (like a "Leaky Gut") or an immuno-compromised system.

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I had quite the opposite effect from probiotics. Probiotics can only do more harm than good if you have intestinal problems (like a "Leaky Gut") or an immuno-compromised system.

How do you figure that? If anything, i think probiotics would help heal leaky gut by adding friendly intestinal flora and help kill off the harmful candida responsible for leaky gut.

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I had quite the opposite effect from probiotics. Probiotics can only do more harm than good if you have intestinal problems (like a "Leaky Gut") or an immuno-compromised system.

How do you figure that? If anything, i think probiotics would help heal leaky gut by adding friendly intestinal flora and help kill off the harmful candida responsible for leaky gut.

Well, since the holes are so big, bacteria can translocate into the bloodstream. I don't care how friendly a micro-organism is, blood is meant to be sterile. Once bacteria gets into the bloodstream, good or bad, it'll do more harm than good.

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i don't know if acidophilus can survive in blood?

It can't...because your immune system will kill the bacteria before it has a chance to spread. Of course if too many get into your blood stream, you are asking for problems.

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No breakouts. I'm awaiting my Sedona Labs iFlora to ship. According to consumerlabs.com, it's the one brand that actually has most of the bacteria still alive when you take it.

In the mean time, I've been taking Nutrition Now PB8, which I dont' think scored very well on consumerlabs.com, so it may just be placebo.

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I was taking probiotics and do so periodically, and when I do I break out worse. Shelley from askshelley.com told me that some individuals are sensitive to probiotics and usually break out on the face. She says that if you tend to react that you will react. However, she said that if you break out in reaction to leaky gut normally you'd break out in spots on the body etc., (and that is usually temporary) but if it's just on the face, it likely means that you are sensitive to the probiotics. I have read on a couple sites that high amounts of acidophilus can cause acne for certain indviduals. So, maybe it's the acidophilus that breaks some people out, and if you tried a single strain that's not acidophilus, see if that breaks you out. But again, this is what I was told. Shelley is knowledgable about all this stuff, so I take her word for it. Maybe that will help. ;)

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I was taking probiotics and do so periodically, and when I do I break out worse. Shelley from askshelley.com told me that some individuals are sensitive to probiotics and usually break out on the face. She says that if you tend to react that you will react. However, she said that if you break out in reaction to leaky gut normally you'd break out in spots on the body etc., (and that is usually temporary) but if it's just on the face, it likely means that you are sensitive to the probiotics. I have read on a couple sites that high amounts of acidophilus can cause acne for certain indviduals. So, maybe it's the acidophilus that breaks some people out, and if you tried a single strain that's not acidophilus, see if that breaks you out. But again, this is what I was told. Shelley is knowledgable about all this stuff, so I take her word for it. Maybe that will help. ;)

Do you happen to remember where you read that high amounts of acidophilus could cause acne? Just curious, as I've never heard this.

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Hmm... it may depend on how potent it is. Threelac is very strong and can cause major detox reactions and since acne is a way that we expell toxins....some may experience new or extra acne breakouts. In fact, I know one member developed body acne as a result of the detox reactions from Threelac.

In the general sense though, I would guess that it may not. I never noticed any extra acne or new acne when I took Natren or PB8, but of course we are all different. I would like to add though that according to AskShelley if you DO have a Leaky Gut, then you should not take Probiotics because it will make your sensitivies worse. Probably because the good bacteria will enter your blood stream solo or attached to food and our immune system will attack, which results in possibly...more skin reactions.

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Hmm... it may depend on how potent it is. Threelac is very strong and can cause major detox reactions and since acne is a way that we expell toxins....some may experience new or extra acne breakouts. In fact, I know one member developed body acne as a result of the detox reactions from Threelac.

In the general sense though, I would guess that it may not. I never noticed any extra acne or new acne when I took Natren or PB8, but of course we are all different. I would like to add though that according to AskShelley if you DO have a Leaky Gut, then you should not take Probiotics because it will make your sensitivies worse. Probably because the good bacteria will enter your blood stream solo or attached to food and our immune system will attack, which results in possibly...more skin reactions.

The thing is, Shelley says that leaky gut would result in hives wherever the microbes ended up in the bloodstream or lympth, and the odds of them all ending up on one single place are nil. And I have never experienced that. But I do get an increase in skin eruptions on the face when taking probiotics, and that that is because I am sensitive to microbes as some people are for whatever reason. But I don't believe i have leaky gut. When i stop probiotics my facial acne decreases, so I'm certain of a causal relationship. That's why I just tend to rotate to manage systemic imbalance.

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Hmm... it may depend on how potent it is. Threelac is very strong and can cause major detox reactions and since acne is a way that we expell toxins....some may experience new or extra acne breakouts. In fact, I know one member developed body acne as a result of the detox reactions from Threelac.

In the general sense though, I would guess that it may not. I never noticed any extra acne or new acne when I took Natren or PB8, but of course we are all different. I would like to add though that according to AskShelley if you DO have a Leaky Gut, then you should not take Probiotics because it will make your sensitivies worse. Probably because the good bacteria will enter your blood stream solo or attached to food and our immune system will attack, which results in possibly...more skin reactions.

The thing is, Shelley says that leaky gut would result in hives wherever the microbes ended up in the bloodstream or lympth, and the odds of them all ending up on one single place are nil. And I have never experienced that. But I do get an increase in skin eruptions on the face when taking probiotics, and that that is because I am sensitive to microbes as some people are for whatever reason. But I don't believe i have leaky gut. When i stop probiotics my facial acne decreases, so I'm certain of a causal relationship. That's why I just tend to rotate to manage systemic imbalance.

Absolutely not disputing your experience but can you share what brands of probiotics you've tried? I don't think the majorityof chronic acne is causedby cutaneous bacteria, but there absolutely are types of acne that are caused by p. acnes, staph, demodites (fungi), candida (fungi), other fungi and so perhaps there is a specific strain or two of good bacteria that you are sensitive to aswell. Also, how quickly do you break out, within 24 hours or within several days?

Thanks for your input!

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Hmm... it may depend on how potent it is. Threelac is very strong and can cause major detox reactions and since acne is a way that we expell toxins....some may experience new or extra acne breakouts. In fact, I know one member developed body acne as a result of the detox reactions from Threelac.

In the general sense though, I would guess that it may not. I never noticed any extra acne or new acne when I took Natren or PB8, but of course we are all different. I would like to add though that according to AskShelley if you DO have a Leaky Gut, then you should not take Probiotics because it will make your sensitivies worse. Probably because the good bacteria will enter your blood stream solo or attached to food and our immune system will attack, which results in possibly...more skin reactions.

The thing is, Shelley says that leaky gut would result in hives wherever the microbes ended up in the bloodstream or lympth, and the odds of them all ending up on one single place are nil. And I have never experienced that. But I do get an increase in skin eruptions on the face when taking probiotics, and that that is because I am sensitive to microbes as some people are for whatever reason. But I don't believe i have leaky gut. When i stop probiotics my facial acne decreases, so I'm certain of a causal relationship. That's why I just tend to rotate to manage systemic imbalance.

Absolutely not disputing your experience but can you share what brands of probiotics you've tried? I don't think the majorityof chronic acne is causedby cutaneous bacteria, but there absolutely are types of acne that are caused by p. acnes, staph, demodites (fungi), candida (fungi), other fungi and so perhaps there is a specific strain or two of good bacteria that you are sensitive to aswell. Also, how quickly do you break out, within 24 hours or within several days?

Thanks for your input!

http://www.vigorousliving.com/now8biacbi12.html

http://www.nutritiongeeks.com/florajen-3-60/florajen-3.html

http://www.consumerlab.com/results/nm_acidop.asp

http://www.consumerlab.com/pricecheck.asp?...05-960B594A77DE

http://www.vitaminshoppe.com/store/en/brow....jsp?id=SL-2563

I notice in increase in facial acne within 3-6 days, not right away. I'm not saying the majority of people breakout from probiotics or that I know the technicalities of this and that. I'm simply saying that people like chrisaus are not crazy for thinking that there may be a correlation between taking probiotics and noticing an increase in their acne. I have seen a couple other posts like this one where people say "oh no probiotics aren't worsening your acne. I never experienced that." I know, conversely, that that just may not be as true as one would think. Nonetheless, if you can help figure out my mystery correlation, then that'd be great. Though, I don't know how easy it'd really be to pinpoint it. As I said before, a couple sites state that high amounts of acidophilus may cause acne (obviously in acne prone individuals), though I don't know if they're implying probiotics in general. :think:

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http://www.vigorousliving.com/now8biacbi12.html

http://www.nutritiongeeks.com/florajen-3-60/florajen-3.html

http://www.consumerlab.com/results/nm_acidop.asp

http://www.consumerlab.com/pricecheck.asp?...05-960B594A77DE

http://www.vitaminshoppe.com/store/en/brow....jsp?id=SL-2563

I notice in increase in facial acne within 3-6 days, not right away. I'm not saying the majority of people breakout from probiotics or that I know the technicalities of this and that. I'm simply saying that people like chrisaus are not crazy for thinking that there may be a correlation between taking probiotics and noticing an increase in their acne. I have seen a couple other posts like this one where people say "oh no probiotics aren't worsening your acne. I never experienced that." I know, conversely, that that just may not be as true as one would think. Nonetheless, if you can help figure out my mystery correlation, then that'd be great. Though, I don't know how easy it'd really be to pinpoint it. As I said before, a couple sites state that high amounts of acidophilus may cause acne (obviously in acne prone individuals), though I don't know if they're implying probiotics in general. :think:

LOL, no I'm not laughing at you but at how the bolded section above sounds sooooo familiar! I do understand what it feels like....when people tell you...even though you KNOW...that something you are eating DOES break you out. Grr I tell ya, I became more stressed out once I discovered what was causing/aggrivating/inducing my acne and became 99% clear than when I had not. Why? The constant "debates", innuendos that I'm not educated enough, don't understand the Scientific Method, am just plain irrational, etc on this and other acne boards. While it's from a smaller percentage of people than not, sometimes it's the reason I periodically take breaks or don't always jump in to defend something I knowis true...it can get to you.

Anyway, assuming that this is not a temporary detox reaction or a hypersensitivity linked to LGS, my first suspicion was that perhaps it may have to do with milk, but I noticed one of those formulas was "milk free". Obviously you have taken enough probiotics to know that there IS something in there that is affecting you. So, if we were to try and narrow it down....I would say it's the Acidolpilus. This is what you specifically mentioned and what that website mentioned. Of course you would have to test out other individual strains, but we do know that Lactobacillus Acidolphilus (must be specific) aloneis enough to break you out. Earlier I was going to post something, but opted not to, but perhaps it may have some slight relevancy:

Re: Lactobacillus Sporogenes

From: Jock

Date: 9/7/2003

Time: 11:47:11 PM

Remote Name: 130.94.107.163

Comments

thats what I thought (about sporogenes being the likely useful bacteria in 3lac). Thornes sell it for about $13. Its got some qualities that the usual probiotics dont have.

1. its naturally protected in a spore (supposedly means it will reach the gut ok)

2. It produses the same type of lactic acid that our body does (L+). This means the lactic acid is easily metabolized. Acidophilus lactic acid is not the same (D-), and there is a possibility that the lactic acid from acidophilus can build up because its slower to metabolize. In fact people that have had some of their small intestine cut out often get lactic acidosis, the reason being that too much undigested carbs get into their colon and the bacteria there have a feast and produce far too much of the lactic acid that we cant metabolize efficiently (d-lactic acid)

3. It multiplies in the gut once it germinates.

If anyone felt 3lac helped them, then I would try sporogenes first (as I said a while ago) and see if they get the same benefits (or better) a lot lot cheaper (and no yeast in the probiotic either).

here is one guys story with sporogenes (he calls it lactospore but I think he means the same thing)

http://www.ibdrelief.com/ibdrelief/mypest.html

I might even try it myself.

One thing I would say though to anyone trying it, is dont expect any difference. Just in case they build their hopes up too much. I really dont know if its any better than ordinary probiotics.

heres what Thorne say about it

http://www.thorne.com/pdf/journal/7-4/lact...s_monograph.pdf

http://www.thorne.com/physicians/detail.lasso?id=SF758

Re: Lactobacillus Sporogenes

From: John Uk

Date: 2/19/2004

Time: 6:42:55 PM

Remote Name: 168.143.113.150

Comments

Ive heard good things about sporogenes but never tried them. They are a transitional bacteria (in that they dont live in our intestine naturally and dont take up permanent residence there). The spore supposedly naturally protects it from stomach acid etc and it supposedly reaches the colon intact.

One big difference between sporogenes and most other probiotics is that they produce the type of lactic acid that our body can metabolize easily )L+ lactic acid). Most poeple should be able to handle normal (D-lactic acid) probiotic lactic acid easily but you never know with sensitive people, in which case sporogenes may have an advantage.

People who have "short bowel syndrome" (part of the small intestine removed or missing) are prone to d- Lactic acidosis because food travels through their small intestine too quickly and theres too much food for their normal flora in the colon and the body cant metabolize the d- lactic acid produced by fermentation in the colon quickly enough and they actually end up with d- lactic acidosis.

Perhaps this could happen to some of us (if our small intestine transit time is too fast).

I remeber one guy posted who said he was helped by sporogenes. http://www.ibdrelief.com/ibdrelief/mypest.html

But having said all that, I havent tried sporogenes myself, but at least its pretty cheap.

heres some links

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...3&dopt=Abstract

http://www.thorne.com/pdf/journal/7-4/lact...s_monograph.pdf

so to summarize, most normal probiotics produce d-lactic acid which isnt metabolized efficiently.

sporogenes produce l+ lactic acid and this is efficiently metabolised.

Whether lactic acidosis could be an issue for any of us taking probiotics or lots of fermentation in the colon etc, I have no idea. Orthodox medicine only think its an issue for people with part of their small intestine missing (and even then, most Drs are probably unaware)

http://search.healthyawareness.com/home.asp

I came across this a few months back and it surprised me, but of course there are right (D-) and Left (L-) handed molecules that are created and usually the L- molecules are found to be the safest and most effective while the D-molecules are found to be toxic or inhibitory or less effective. Hence how a drug company can sell a mixture of the two until their patent runs out and then sell the pure form L (or the R- form) later on making a much larger profit on the more effective drug!

Role of Lactobacilli:

B. Organic Acid Production

Lactobacilli produce lactic acid. Organic acetic and lactic acids which are produced by lactic acid bacteria will inhibit the growth of many bacteria, especially pathogenic gram-negative types7. Lactobacillus acidophilus produces DL-lactic acid which is metabolized to a limited extent12.

C. Lower pH and Oxidation Reduction

Inhibition of pathogens by Lactobacilli is attributed to the lowering of the pH values by the liberation of acids, resulting in antimicrobial action (altering oxidation-reduction potential)13.

D. Competitive Antagonists

Lactobacilli may outcompete other bacteria for nutrients and occupy the sites, making them unavailable to other microorganisms13.

In particular, Lactobacilli consume certain B-vitamins and biotin, decreasing their availability for other organisms14.

[Role of Bifidobacteria:]

B. Organic Acid Production

Bifidobacteria produces both aceticand lactic acids, but produces more acetic acid. Acetic acid has a stronger antagonistic effect against gram-negative bacteria than lactic acid12. Bifidobacteria ferment carbohydrates to L(+)-lactic acid and acetic acid in a molar ratio of 2:3, producing small amounts of formic acid, succinic acid, and ethanol10). L(+)-lactic acid is more easily metabolized.

C. Lower pH

Bifidogenic factors (e.g. lactulose) added to the diet induce the growth of Bifidobacteria, decreasing the pH in the large intestine12.

D. Competitive Antagonistics

Bifidobacteria prevent the colonization of the intestine by invading pathogens by competition for nutrients and attachment sites to the epithelial surfaces12.

Strains of Bifidobacteria may partially or completely inhibit the reduction of nitrates by other organisms through beneficial competition with other intestinal bacteria12

http://www.garynull.com/Documents/Arthriti...ly_Bacteria.htm

So perhaps, this may the be the issue with Lactobacillus Acidophilus, since we know that this strain of bacteria aggrevates you and was mentioned as a problem in at least another website. What we don't know is if there is a link with D-Lactic Acid buildup and acne or some other skin disorder. Of course we also don't know if you have problems specifically with others strains of good bacteria. If you don't want to test out the Lactobacillus Sporogenes (I would understand why) but are still interested in getting some probiotics, you may want to read up on the fermenting foods to produce your own natural probiotic food source (fermented cabbage, saurkraut, kombucha tea, etc).

That's my thoughts for the moment. If you come across that other website please post it. Perhaps it gives us more information.

Take care ;)

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http://www.vigorousliving.com/now8biacbi12.html

http://www.nutritiongeeks.com/florajen-3-60/florajen-3.html

http://www.consumerlab.com/results/nm_acidop.asp

http://www.consumerlab.com/pricecheck.asp?...05-960B594A77DE

http://www.vitaminshoppe.com/store/en/brow....jsp?id=SL-2563

I notice in increase in facial acne within 3-6 days, not right away. I'm not saying the majority of people breakout from probiotics or that I know the technicalities of this and that. I'm simply saying that people like chrisaus are not crazy for thinking that there may be a correlation between taking probiotics and noticing an increase in their acne. I have seen a couple other posts like this one where people say "oh no probiotics aren't worsening your acne. I never experienced that." I know, conversely, that that just may not be as true as one would think. Nonetheless, if you can help figure out my mystery correlation, then that'd be great. Though, I don't know how easy it'd really be to pinpoint it. As I said before, a couple sites state that high amounts of acidophilus may cause acne (obviously in acne prone individuals), though I don't know if they're implying probiotics in general. :think:

LOL, no I'm not laughing at you but at how the bolded section above sounds sooooo familiar! I do understand what it feels like....when people tell you...even though you KNOW...that something you are eating DOES break you out. Grr I tell ya, I became more stressed out once I discovered what was causing/aggrivating/inducing my acne and became 99% clear than when I had not. Why? The constant "debates", innuendos that I'm not educated enough, don't understand the Scientific Method, am just plain irrational, etc on this and other acne boards. While it's from a smaller percentage of people than not, sometimes it's the reason I periodically take breaks or don't always jump in to defend something I knowis true...it can get to you.

Anyway, assuming that this is not a temporary detox reaction or a hypersensitivity linked to LGS, my first suspicion was that perhaps it may have to do with milk, but I noticed one of those formulas was "milk free". Obviously you have taken enough probiotics to know that there IS something in there that is affecting you. So, if we were to try and narrow it down....I would say it's the Acidolpilus. This is what you specifically mentioned and what that website mentioned. Of course you would have to test out other individual strains, but we do know that Lactobacillus Acidolphilus (must be specific) aloneis enough to break you out. Earlier I was going to post something, but opted not to, but perhaps it may have some slight relevancy:

Re: Lactobacillus Sporogenes

From: Jock

Date: 9/7/2003

Time: 11:47:11 PM

Remote Name: 130.94.107.163

Comments

thats what I thought (about sporogenes being the likely useful bacteria in 3lac). Thornes sell it for about $13. Its got some qualities that the usual probiotics dont have.

1. its naturally protected in a spore (supposedly means it will reach the gut ok)

2. It produses the same type of lactic acid that our body does (L+). This means the lactic acid is easily metabolized. Acidophilus lactic acid is not the same (D-), and there is a possibility that the lactic acid from acidophilus can build up because its slower to metabolize. In fact people that have had some of their small intestine cut out often get lactic acidosis, the reason being that too much undigested carbs get into their colon and the bacteria there have a feast and produce far too much of the lactic acid that we cant metabolize efficiently (d-lactic acid)

3. It multiplies in the gut once it germinates.

If anyone felt 3lac helped them, then I would try sporogenes first (as I said a while ago) and see if they get the same benefits (or better) a lot lot cheaper (and no yeast in the probiotic either).

here is one guys story with sporogenes (he calls it lactospore but I think he means the same thing)

http://www.ibdrelief.com/ibdrelief/mypest.html

I might even try it myself.

One thing I would say though to anyone trying it, is dont expect any difference. Just in case they build their hopes up too much. I really dont know if its any better than ordinary probiotics.

heres what Thorne say about it

http://www.thorne.com/pdf/journal/7-4/lact...s_monograph.pdf

http://www.thorne.com/physicians/detail.lasso?id=SF758

Re: Lactobacillus Sporogenes

From: John Uk

Date: 2/19/2004

Time: 6:42:55 PM

Remote Name: 168.143.113.150

Comments

Ive heard good things about sporogenes but never tried them. They are a transitional bacteria (in that they dont live in our intestine naturally and dont take up permanent residence there). The spore supposedly naturally protects it from stomach acid etc and it supposedly reaches the colon intact.

One big difference between sporogenes and most other probiotics is that they produce the type of lactic acid that our body can metabolize easily )L+ lactic acid). Most poeple should be able to handle normal (D-lactic acid) probiotic lactic acid easily but you never know with sensitive people, in which case sporogenes may have an advantage.

People who have "short bowel syndrome" (part of the small intestine removed or missing) are prone to d- Lactic acidosis because food travels through their small intestine too quickly and theres too much food for their normal flora in the colon and the body cant metabolize the d- lactic acid produced by fermentation in the colon quickly enough and they actually end up with d- lactic acidosis.

Perhaps this could happen to some of us (if our small intestine transit time is too fast).

I remeber one guy posted who said he was helped by sporogenes. http://www.ibdrelief.com/ibdrelief/mypest.html

But having said all that, I havent tried sporogenes myself, but at least its pretty cheap.

heres some links

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...3&dopt=Abstract

http://www.thorne.com/pdf/journal/7-4/lact...s_monograph.pdf

so to summarize, most normal probiotics produce d-lactic acid which isnt metabolized efficiently.

sporogenes produce l+ lactic acid and this is efficiently metabolised.

Whether lactic acidosis could be an issue for any of us taking probiotics or lots of fermentation in the colon etc, I have no idea. Orthodox medicine only think its an issue for people with part of their small intestine missing (and even then, most Drs are probably unaware)

http://search.healthyawareness.com/home.asp

I came across this a few months back and it surprised me, but of course there are right (D-) and Left (L-) handed molecules that are created and usually the L- molecules are found to be the safest and most effective while the D-molecules are found to be toxic or inhibitory or less effective. Hence how a drug company can sell a mixture of the two until their patent runs out and then sell the pure form L (or the R- form) later on making a much larger profit on the more effective drug!

Role of Lactobacilli:

B. Organic Acid Production

Lactobacilli produce lactic acid. Organic acetic and lactic acids which are produced by lactic acid bacteria will inhibit the growth of many bacteria, especially pathogenic gram-negative types7. Lactobacillus acidophilus produces DL-lactic acid which is metabolized to a limited extent12.

C. Lower pH and Oxidation Reduction

Inhibition of pathogens by Lactobacilli is attributed to the lowering of the pH values by the liberation of acids, resulting in antimicrobial action (altering oxidation-reduction potential)13.

D. Competitive Antagonists

Lactobacilli may outcompete other bacteria for nutrients and occupy the sites, making them unavailable to other microorganisms13.

In particular, Lactobacilli consume certain B-vitamins and biotin, decreasing their availability for other organisms14.

[Role of Bifidobacteria:]

B. Organic Acid Production

Bifidobacteria produces both aceticand lactic acids, but produces more acetic acid. Acetic acid has a stronger antagonistic effect against gram-negative bacteria than lactic acid12. Bifidobacteria ferment carbohydrates to L(+)-lactic acid and acetic acid in a molar ratio of 2:3, producing small amounts of formic acid, succinic acid, and ethanol10). L(+)-lactic acid is more easily metabolized.

C. Lower pH

Bifidogenic factors (e.g. lactulose) added to the diet induce the growth of Bifidobacteria, decreasing the pH in the large intestine12.

D. Competitive Antagonistics

Bifidobacteria prevent the colonization of the intestine by invading pathogens by competition for nutrients and attachment sites to the epithelial surfaces12.

Strains of Bifidobacteria may partially or completely inhibit the reduction of nitrates by other organisms through beneficial competition with other intestinal bacteria12

http://www.garynull.com/Documents/Arthriti...ly_Bacteria.htm

So perhaps, this may the be the issue with Lactobacillus Acidophilus, since we know that this strain of bacteria aggrevates you and was mentioned as a problem in at least another website. What we don't know is if there is a link with D-Lactic Acid buildup and acne or some other skin disorder. Of course we also don't know if you have problems specifically with others strains of good bacteria. If you don't want to test out the Lactobacillus Sporogenes (I would understand why) but are still interested in getting some probiotics, you may want to read up on the fermenting foods to produce your own natural probiotic food source (fermented cabbage, saurkraut, kombucha tea, etc).

That's my thoughts for the moment. If you come across that other website please post it. Perhaps it gives us more information.

Take care ;)

Great information. I'll empirically try to figure this out and post back. :)

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wow so much information to read through. Thanks a million for the replies Jade and faithfromheart. I'll sift through it all later on in the day.

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Hi - I can't thank you guys enough for this post. I thought I was losing my mind. Who cares/long story, but I took probiotics and after 3-4 days, my face erupted in cystic acne and have sores on my tongue. I stopped last night and it's already going down. I have NEVER EVER had acne in my life. The stuff I took was 10mg of laci-something and acidophilus. I've already thrown it away.

Somebody advised I take it because I was simply having a problem with irregularity and do take thyroid medication, so a friend advised I try it, which I understand. Everybody loves it. But I'd just as soon eat my yogurt, thank you.

It's not the antidote for everyone, at any rate. I'm in my 50s, so it's not like it's young adult acne or any of the other crap that my doctor tried to tell me on the phone. She would NOT believe me, but finally said, ok, stop taking it.

And I have and I'll letcha know what happens two days from now. This is goofy, I know, but quite, quite true.

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Hate to bump this again but breaking out soon after a new treatment is supposed to mean the treatment is working. I'm not a scientist or anything but plenty of people including dermatologist agree with this.

The problem with acne is that it starts internally and the acne process can be in action days before you see a pimple. They say that your body will react soon after a treatment by pushing out all the remaining acne left in your system first, then it has less to deal with as the product (Probiotic/antibiotic) is doing its job.

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Probiotics helps kill the yeast/candida in your body, thoose seems to cause acne for many people. And whats even worse then yeast/candida in your body is dead yeast/candida beacuase it has to pass through your body before your body gets rid of it and thats why you get an initial breakout from almost every good diet or herb etc.

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I took Primal Defense probiotic pills for about a month and they did much more harm than good. Huge breakout that didn't fade until I stopped using them (about 1 month)

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Probiotics helps kill the yeast/candida in your body, thoose seems to cause acne for many people. And whats even worse then yeast/candida in your body is dead yeast/candida beacuase it has to pass through your body before your body gets rid of it and thats why you get an initial breakout from almost every good diet or herb etc.

I know this is an old post but I agree with you. I am currently working on getting my candida out of my system and candida die off symptoms can be the same as the usual candida symptoms except mroe severe, hence the acne being more severe than usual.

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