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katieuk

Decided against Accutane....now what???

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howdi after much thought and research i have decided against going on accutane for my cystic acne...mainly to do with the possible (scary) side effects.

i suffered with mental health problems (anxiety,agrophobia,panic attacks) a few years ago,and i really feel that i cant risk a recurrance (even a 1% risk is tooo much)of these dibilittating illnesses.

The thing that worries me tho, is that the derm said that there is nothing else,after accutane,left to offer me.

Has any one else been told this? i have tried 4 different types of antibiotics,nothing really helped .i am currently on eyrythromicin tablets,which havent done alot after 6 months...

any advice,would be really helpful*

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They do say that accutane is a last resort med, to be used when everything else fails.

Have u tried dianette/yasmin or another bcp? I know one of the side effects of dianette CAN be depression but not everyone gets the side effects.

Did you speak to your derm about your past health problems? Ive read that some ppl take antidepressants at the same time as accutane.

Ive tried 4 different antibiotics, topicals, and am currently on dianette. I have an appt with my derm next week (first one) as my doctor says my spots are getting worse (good she actually noticed this time).... so i dont know what to expect, im just fed up now of trying things that dont work...

Maybe you should talk to your derm again? Good luck with whatever you do try tho :)

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yeh there is nothing out there at the moment that will work better than accutane. Usually the derm will try you on other medications before accutane and only use accutane as a last resort so once you get to that stage there is not much else they can do. I would seriously consider accutane if i was you, i have had the same kind of problems as you and i went on acutane and i felt better for it because it got rid of the cause of my problems (acne). There are lots of side affects but i have not heard of anyone on this site who has been on it having very bad side affect, usually just dryness which was all i got as well.

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I do agree that Accutane has nasty side effects. A while ago I posted a ebook on one of the threads about the side effects of Accutane.

The moderators removed it. That was just spiteful. People should be warn about side effects of some treatments.

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I had good results with birth control pills (dianette) for many years so you could try that. You could also try a diet/holistic approach. I didn't find it very helpful (and ultimately that is why I am now on accutane) but there are some others that swear by it. You could also try some kind of laser treatment - there are some other threads about it.

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There is also Photodynamic Therapy.

http://www.aad.org/public/News/NewsRelease...amicTherapy.htm

“Lasers are typically thought of as cosmetic devices, but from their inception in the field of dermatology almost 30 years ago, lasers have been used for the treatment of clinical conditions, as well,� said Dr. Nestor. “In addition, photodynamic therapy has been used investigationally to treat various conditions such as retinal problems associated with the eyes and precancerous conditions of the esophagus or bladder. However, dermatologists have recently combined the use of lasers and light devices with elements of photodynamic therapy to make great strides in the treatment of prevalent facial skin conditions.�

Photodynamic therapy using a topical medication called aminolevulinic acid has been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to treat actinic keratosis (AKs), an early potential sign of skin cancer. Unfortunately, initial treatment using this medication overnight, combined with laser therapy, was found to be both difficult and uncomfortable for the patient. However, recent developments using aminolevulinic acid with lasers and light sources for shorter treatment periods (i.e. one hour), called “short contact� photodynamic therapy, have yielded much more positive results.

A typical short contact photodynamic therapy treatment begins with a light microdermabrasion. This technique is used to remove any dead skin cells on the surface of the face, which allows for better penetration of the aminolevulinic acid. The microdermabrasion is followed by a topical application of aminolevulinic acid, which is left in place for approximately 30 to 60 minutes. The medication is then removed using an alcohol swab, soap and water. Finally, the patient is treated with a laser or light source.

According to Dr. Nestor, “Photodynamic therapy is an essentially painless procedure for the patient. While initial results may be seen as early as the first session, some patients require a series of three to five sessions to see significant results. However, it really depends on the patient and the severity of the skin condition being treated.�

Short contact photodynamic therapy has proven successful in the treatment of moderate to severe cystic acne, a condition usually treated with the long-term use of antibiotics or isotretinoin. However, antibiotic treatments and isotretinoin can be associated with certain side effects, and antibiotics have limited effectiveness in many patients. Acne treatments using short contact photodynamic therapy with aminolevulinic acid and lasers or light sources appear to have positive effects in significant numbers of individuals. Patients usually undergo three procedures, and side effects have included some slight facial redness. New studies also highlight that certain FDA approved light sources (blue light) can improve inflammatory acne in just a few short sessions without any side effects.

“It generally takes around two to six weeks to see significant results for patients with acne,� said Dr. Nestor. “While it is still early in the investigational process, photodynamic therapy, as well as light-based therapy for acne, appears to provide long-term improvement for patients. It is anticipated that FDA trials on this treatment will begin very soon.�

Short contact photodynamic therapy, as well as intense pulse light photorejuvenation, have also been used to successfully treat patients with rosacea, a common skin condition that causes redness and swelling on the face, as well as thickening of the skin. Until now, the primary treatment for rosacea has been antibiotics (both oral and topical). Antibiotic treatment has had some success in reducing the blood vessels and redness associated with rosacea. However, dermatologists are finding that intense pulse light photorejuvenation and short contact photodynamic therapy, again using aminolevulinic acid, may also successfully improve the redness and thickening skin of patients with this condition.

In addition to acne and rosacea, short contact photodynamic therapy treatments have made significant cosmetic improvements in patients with long-term sun damage.

“The symptoms of sun damage, such as rough skin, pigmentary problems, wrinkles, and certain early signs of skin cancer, have exploded in recent years due to the thinning ozone layer and various lifestyles associated with sun exposure. Therefore, sun damage is one of the most prevalent conditions treated by dermatologists,� said Dr. Nestor. “The latest photodynamic therapy techniques are giving patients another option for the treatment of sun damage and are improving their cosmetic outlook.�

Short contact photodynamic therapy appears to be an important step in the treatment of acne, rosacea and sun damage. This combination treatment is also finding success in a variety of other conditions such as keratosis pilaris (severely dry skin), certain types of warts, molluscum (a non-cancerous skin growth), and excessive oiliness of the skin.

The American Academy of Dermatology, founded in 1938, is the largest, most influential, and most representative of all dermatologic associations. With a membership of over 14,000 dermatologists worldwide, the Academy is comitted to: advancing the diagnosis and medical, surgical, and cosmetic treatment of the skin, hair and nails; advocating high standards in clinical practice, education, and research in dermatology; supporting and enhancing patient care for a lifetime of healthier skin. For more information, contact the Academy at 1-888-462-DERM or www.aad.org.

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howdi after much thought and research i have decided against going on accutane for my cystic acne...mainly to do with the possible (scary) side effects.

i suffered with mental health problems (anxiety,agrophobia,panic attacks) a few years ago,and i really feel that i cant risk a recurrance (even a 1% risk is tooo much)of these dibilittating illnesses.

The thing that worries me tho, is that the derm said that there is nothing else,after accutane,left to offer me.

Has any one else been told this? i have tried 4 different types of antibiotics,nothing really helped .i am currently on eyrythromicin tablets,which havent done alot after 6 months...

any advice,would be really helpful*

I had cystic acne too. I use aloe vera soap and aloe vera cream. I'm having great success with it. It doesn't work for everyone and it may take a few weeks to see a major improvement, but if you want to find out for yourself if it will work for you, it's called Aloe Vera by GRISI. I purchased mine at Wal.mart. Good luck!

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