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Spironolactone ages your skin?

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Hi all. I tried 12mg of spironolactone for only 2 days and I had to stop because a friend said I looked like I aged 8 years. I didn't tell him that I was on spiro. The spiro made me pee a lot and I noticed my skin drying up, and my eyes looked tired. My skin also seem to lost its youthful plumpness. Drinking lots of water doesn't help. Has anyone noticed changes with their skin? It changes my facial expression too. I see that some of you take 50mg?? wow! I can't imagine taking that high a dosage.

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The lowest dose you can get comes in 25mg pills and you took half of that for only two days.

Whatever the reason for the symptoms you listed, it isn't the spironolactone.

You do realize it's a diuretic, yes? And that low of a dose for only two days, it not only would not have had enough time to clear your acne up, but stopping it would not have caused you to break out.

What other medications do you take? How old are you? Have you spoke with your doctor about your symptoms? Have you been getting enough sleep? Have you been partying and drinking alcohol?

Sometimes the power of the mind can influence our health in many ways. Maybe you clearing up and breaking out are coincidental or maybe it's mind over matter. Whatever the case, you most definitely did not take it long enough to have any effect one way or another.

I think your friend was just being mean. Who says that to their friends?

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Hi Susan. Yes I did take it for only 2 days. I can't think of anything I did that could age me by 8 years! I look normal now after stopping it. Somehow my body has a strong reaction to any medication's side effects. The clearing up and breaking out could be from my menstrual cycle. I'm going to try it again at a different time to see how it goes. I'm 28 and I take birth control pills for my acne which really helped clear up my skin. But I'm actually taking spiro to induce breast growth and prevent stretch marks. Thanks.

You right. He's mean but I always turn to him for an honest opinion. Rude yes but honest. :)

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I've "talked" with a few people here on both BC pills and spironolactone. My doctors advised against it. I was worried about taking it because I already have low blood pressure and it's supposed to lower your blood pressure, something I didn't need. I'm sensitive to bc pills now as they increase my migraines I get each month but I have not had that side effect from spironolactone.

I'd be more apt to guess that you're looking "older" was more due to being overtired and pre-menstrual. Perhaps the spirono dehydrated you a little but I can't see that happening in two days. It also suppresses androgen thereby suppressing oil production but, again, two days wouldn't effect oil production.

Maybe the bc pill combined with spironolactone doesn't work for you. Which bc pill do you take?

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I've "talked" with a few people here on both BC pills and spironolactone. My doctors advised against it. I was worried about taking it because I already have low blood pressure and it's supposed to lower your blood pressure, something I didn't need.

Susan, have you ever considered your low blood pressure, acne, blotchy brown spots to be linked to adrenal gland disease? Do you also have hypoglycemia? (feeling cranky and nervous until you eat something) I believe my acne is caused by high insulin levels which is all related to diseases of the gland. Too much insulin increases androgens. That's how spironolactone works, by lowering insulin it lowers androgens. I lowered it by diet and it really improves my skin, even the smell of my skin sebum changed from metallic to sweet (the way female sebum should smell). Why did your doctor advise against taking spiro with BC pills?

I'm sensitive to bc pills now as they increase my migraines I get each month but I have not had that side effect from spironolactone.

I take Mircette because I don't feel good on high estrogen dose pills either. It has 1/3 less estradiol. I don't know why they put so much estrogen in these pills. I think it causes too many problems and is unnecessary. It's the best pill for acne and least side effects out of many brands I tried. What brand did you take?

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Susan, have you ever considered your low blood pressure, acne, blotchy brown spots to be linked to adrenal gland disease? Do you also have hypoglycemia? (feeling cranky and nervous until you eat something) I believe my acne is caused by high insulin levels which is all related to diseases of the gland. Too much insulin increases androgens. That's how spironolactone works, by lowering insulin it lowers androgens. I lowered it by diet and it really improves my skin, even the smell of my skin sebum changed from metallic to sweet (the way female sebum should smell). Why did your doctor advise against taking spiro with BC pills?

I don't have hypoglycemia but diabetes runs in my mom's side of the family. Nobody in my family on either side have acne issues. With me, it started at the onset of the early stages of puberty (three years before I started my period) at about 10 years old, and it's never went away. Low blood pressure is normal for small, petite women, I'm told. I've always been 90/60 as far back as I can remember paying attention to it (in my early teens). I don't have blotchy brown spots, though. The only discoloration I get is actually acne scars, but I don't get brown pigmentation spots on my face or body.

I do understand the research showing a correllation between diet and acne but I don't think that is the final answer. At least not with me.

I take Mircette because I don't feel good on high estrogen dose pills either. It has 1/3 less estradiol. I don't know why they put so much estrogen in these pills. I think it causes too many problems and is unnecessary. It's the best pill for acne and least side effects out of many brands I tried. What brand did you take?

I was probably told not to take both bc pills and spironolactone because for one thing it's overkill and for another my doctors err on the side of caution. I have a history of low blood pressure, migraines and I'm in my late 30s. It just didn't seem like good medicine to them. If I didn't acne and migraines, I wouldn't be taking any medication and I wouldn't be spending thousands of dollars on laser treatments for acne. Other people eat like complete crap, never take care of their skin and never get acne -- they don't know how lucky they are.

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You got the same history as me. My acne also started around age 10, still fighting it at age 28. My mother's side of the family also has diabetes type 2. Sometimes it's called Metabolic Sydrome or Syndrome X. It has a whole cluster of problems from blood pressure, acne, myopia, sugar metabolism, insulin, PMS, tall height and so on. They say if you have a family history of diabetes, you'll have problems with acne. It's related to insulin resistance.

I find diet made no difference when used alone. It is fussy to stick with. Me too, I wish I was like those people can go on a day without washing their face or eat whatever they want and have good skin. On a good BC pill, you can eat all the Mickey D's and nachos and have not one zit. But darn those side effects. I'm on the BC pill for 10 years. Never been off it.

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Susan, have you ever considered your low blood pressure, acne, blotchy brown spots to be linked to adrenal gland disease? Do you also have hypoglycemia? (feeling cranky and nervous until you eat something) I believe my acne is caused by high insulin levels which is all related to diseases of the gland. Too much insulin increases androgens. That's how spironolactone works, by lowering insulin it lowers androgens. I lowered it by diet and it really improves my skin, even the smell of my skin sebum changed from metallic to sweet (the way female sebum should smell). Why did your doctor advise against taking spiro with BC pills?

I don't have hypoglycemia but diabetes runs in my mom's side of the family. Nobody in my family on either side have acne issues. With me, it started at the onset of the early stages of puberty (three years before I started my period) at about 10 years old, and it's never went away. Low blood pressure is normal for small, petite women, I'm told. I've always been 90/60 as far back as I can remember paying attention to it (in my early teens). I don't have blotchy brown spots, though. The only discoloration I get is actually acne scars, but I don't get brown pigmentation spots on my face or body.

I do understand the research showing a correllation between diet and acne but I don't think that is the final answer. At least not with me.

I take Mircette because I don't feel good on high estrogen dose pills either. It has 1/3 less estradiol. I don't know why they put so much estrogen in these pills. I think it causes too many problems and is unnecessary. It's the best pill for acne and least side effects out of many brands I tried. What brand did you take?

I was probably told not to take both bc pills and spironolactone because for one thing it's overkill and for another my doctors err on the side of caution. I have a history of low blood pressure, migraines and I'm in my late 30s. It just didn't seem like good medicine to them. If I didn't acne and migraines, I wouldn't be taking any medication and I wouldn't be spending thousands of dollars on laser treatments for acne. Other people eat like complete crap, never take care of their skin and never get acne -- they don't know how lucky they are.

susan, have you tried to find the underlying causes of your acne?

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It's hormones, primarily. But if you are also asking if I have a metabollic disorder, then I don't know. I've never been tested for one that I am aware but it's possible. I guess I can ask my doctor when I go in for my annual...

I honestly think there is something that nobody really considers: recessive genes. I think there is some genetic quirk that makes us predispositioned for acne and any little thing sets if off.

I suppose if I followed some supr strict and rigid diet in addition to all of the other advice modern medicine gives, I may be able to control my acne to some extent. But there are so many opinions on what to eat and what not to eat -- there doesn't seem to be any consensus. Some people suggest practicly overdosing on vitamin supplements while others tell you to avoid them.

Some tell you to avoid all forms of carbohydrates but that's impossible, it is for me, anyway -- it'll never happen. Even if I could survive on only vegetables and water, it is not an option for my family, for my children.

Diet is not going to change my migraines either -- I'll still get them every month around my period until I go through menopause and even then, will still occasionally get them. That's just my heredity.

Question: if it's determined to be a metabollic disorder, then what? What do they do to treat it?

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You could ask your doctor for a glucose, insulin, and ACTH test. I'm going to get these done soon. I think medicine today focuses on the symptoms and not the big picture of what's wrong with your body. My dermatologist has put me on one antibiotic and cream right after another until she doesn't know what to do with me anymore. BC pills are the closest cure for my set of symptoms that I can find: loss of appetite, anxiety, fatigue, acne, lack of ability to concentrate... all which disappeared when I started BC pills. It's not a cure but it fixed a set of problems which belonged to a syndrome. I'm not sure what it is. Seems like doctors only look at you as one symptom and the only thing they know is to write prescriptions.

I honestly think there is something that nobody really considers: recessive genes. I think there is some genetic quirk that makes us predispositioned for acne and any little thing sets if off.

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It's hormones, primarily. But if you are also asking if I have a metabollic disorder, then I don't know. I've never been tested for one that I am aware but it's possible. I guess I can ask my doctor when I go in for my annual...

I honestly think there is something that nobody really considers: recessive genes. I think there is some genetic quirk that makes us predispositioned for acne and any little thing sets if off.

I suppose if I followed some supr strict and rigid diet in addition to all of the other advice modern medicine gives, I may be able to control my acne to some extent. But there are so many opinions on what to eat and what not to eat -- there doesn't seem to be any consensus. Some people suggest practicly overdosing on vitamin supplements while others tell you to avoid them.

Some tell you to avoid all forms of carbohydrates but that's impossible, it is for me, anyway -- it'll never happen. Even if I could survive on only vegetables and water, it is not an option for my family, for my children.

Diet is not going to change my migraines either -- I'll still get them every month around my period until I go through menopause and even then, will still occasionally get them. That's just my heredity.

Question: if it's determined to be a metabollic disorder, then what? What do they do to treat it?

if it's a disorder such as hyperthyroidism, they remove part or all of the thyroid. those who have acne definitely have an excess of androgens in their body. excess androgen output can have MANY potential causes -- endocrine tumor, liver overload, et cetera. unfortunately, with many of these textbook-minded doctors, they will dismiss many of these notions and recommend you visit a psychiatrist. most doctors even deny the existence of systemic candida infections and "leaky gut" -- both of which may influence the output of androgens.

also, potential food allergies may pose a problem, and those should be tested for first thing.

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So I looked up metabollic syndrome and got information from the American Heart Association. I don't have nay of the risk factors it listed.

http://www.americanheart.org/presenter.jhtml?identifier=4756

Metabolic Syndrome

What is the metabolic syndrome?

The metabolic syndrome is characterized by a group of metabolic risk factors in one person. They include:

Abdominal obesity (excessive fat tissue in and around the abdomen)

Atherogenic dyslipidemia (blood fat disorders  high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol and high LDL cholesterol  that foster plaque buildups in artery walls)

Elevated blood pressure

Insulin resistance or glucose intolerance (the body can’t properly use insulin or blood sugar)

Prothrombotic state (e.g., high fibrinogen or plasminogen activator inhibitor–1 in the blood)

Proinflammatory state (e.g., elevated C-reactive protein in the blood)

People with the metabolic syndrome are at increased risk of coronary heart disease and other diseases related to plaque buildups in artery walls (e.g., stroke and peripheral vascular disease) and type 2 diabetes. The metabolic syndrome has become increasingly common in the United States. It’s estimated that over 50 million Americans have it.

The dominant underlying risk factors for this syndrome appear to be abdominal obesity and insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is a generalized metabolic disorder, in which the body can’t use insulin efficiently. This is why the metabolic syndrome is also called the insulin resistance syndrome.

Other conditions associated with the syndrome include physical inactivity, aging, hormonal imbalance and genetic predisposition.

Some people are genetically predisposed to insulin resistance. Acquired factors, such as excess body fat and physical inactivity, can elicit insulin resistance and the metabolic syndrome in these people. Most people with insulin resistance have abdominal obesity. The biologic mechanisms at the molecular level between insulin resistance and metabolic risk factors aren’t fully understood and appear to be complex.

I'm not obese. I'm 5'1" and weigh 115 lbs. While I do need to lose 10lbs, I'm far from overweight. (I wear size 4 and 2 in some things).

I don't have a blood fat disorder and my lipid panel/triglycerides are all within the normal healthy range.

I don't have elevated blood pressure (hypertension). I have low blood pressure (hypotension). Not many 38 year olds can boast 90/60.

I don't have insulin resistance or glucose intolerance. I have some family history of late onset type II diabetes, but I've never had an issue with it.

The rest of the risk factors do not apply to me either.

In addition, I'm not physically inactive. I may not be as athletic as I was when I was younger and I could stand to do a lot more exercise than I do, but I'm most definitely not sedentary.

I am aging but at 38 I'm not ready for the nursing home yet!

I have no hormonal imbalance other than I'm androgen sensitive, obviously.

There is some genetic predispostion for type II diabetes.

I'm going to look up Syndrome X now.

Syndrome X is the same thing as Metabollic Syndrome.

Hmm, well I will still ask my doctor to check on it when I have my annual exam next.

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Hi Susan. I'm also petite like you. I'm 5'5" and weigh 116 lbs and I have close to a flat belly. My stats are normal except for a little high cholesterol. The American Heart Association paints only a limited profile of a person with Metabolic Syndrome / Syndrome X. You don't need to be obese. People who have it comes in all different sizes and have different symptoms. For example, my friend who has PCOS has a fit muscular build, hairy body, big pores but no acne. She has too much androgens because of insulin. So do I but I look different from her. I look feminine but have no boobs. Another woman who I know has an androgen problem is obese, has big pores, oily skin, and a deep voice. Metabolic Syndrome affects men too. Some look like Waldo: skinny, tall, acne, nearsighted. Others have big bellies.

You say your mother has Diabetes Type 2? So she probably has gestational diabetes while she's pregnant having you. Pregnant women eat too much so they need to produce extra insulin. When it's not enough, the fetus's pancreas pumps out more insulin to assist the mother. After birth, the fetus' insulin levels are kept high. Insulin is the master hormone of other hormones, so it messes you up around puberty. That's why people who are descendants of diabetes type 2 often get acne. My mother has diabetes type 2 and I have severe cystic acne. My sister is healthy like an astronaut but her blood pressure can get low at times.

Maybe you don't have an insulin problem, Susan. Maybe I don't too. It's good to get tested for it. Insulin is toxic to your body and cause many other problems in the future.

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No, my mom doesn't have diabetes but a couple of her siblings do. Her mother, my grandmother did too. My mother has never had diabetes, not even with her pregnancies.

But I'll have the doctor check for the things you mentioned at my next annual exam.

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i take 50mg of spirolactone once a day and i'm fine. i even had my levels checked and other than a bit lower blood pressure but nothing severe i'm completely healthy. i should also mention i take minocyline AND diane 35 and am doing well (and adderall and clonazepam for my ADD and OCD)

differnet people respond to drugs in different ways, do NOT take the mere ramblings of a friend. talk to a doctor and if you're concerned with the way a drug is working on you GET YOURSELF CHECKED OUT. also i'm concerned with the dose...12mg??? are you sure? this one only comes with 10 as the lowest dose i beleive...are you self medicating??

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I'm sorry, but I really don't believe it's possible, especially with only taking it 2 days and somehow being able to take such a low dose. I have been taking 200 mg for severe acne caused by PCOS for well over 6 months and I have had no problems whatsoever. I have never heard of it being able to age your skin, if anything you may have somehow been dehydrated, but I doubt it aged your skin. I don't know if taking it just to induce breast growth and prevent stretch marks though is a real good way to use it though, and I mean no offense when I say that. I have never heard it used in that way. There may be nothing wrong with your hormones and it may not be for you because of that, but that's my opinion.

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Yes I was self-medicating on Spiro. I think I have chemical sensitivity. Seems like every med I take, the side affects are much worse. After a week free of spiro, my friend saw me yesterday and he said, "wow! you look so radiant!" So I definitely think it's the spiro. He said there was a big change with my face since the last time he saw me on spiro. I noticed it too. My face now looks more relaxed and smooth, probably went back to hydration. I read about another person's account who had the same experience as me. Hmm.. maybe I got wierd kidneys.

Makochan, yes it can correct underdeveloped breasts in women, and also grow them in men. :) Male to female transsexuals use spiro for that. So guys be careful!!! Don't want your girlfriends feeling up your boobs when you make out.

Tire_of_Waiting, you're right. Maybe it's not a good idea to mess around with this stuff. I got a blood test today to check out my insulin, cortisol, prednisone, and other hormones. I think all acne sufferers should get a complete hormone test. Acne usually comes with other problems too.

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Susan, have you ever considered your low blood pressure, acne, blotchy brown spots to be linked to adrenal gland disease? Do you also have hypoglycemia?

Cyndotcom, I experience these symptoms although I am unsure about my blood pressure, as far as I know it's been relatively normal but I am also petite as well (5'0). I also have underdeveloped breasts (I'm a VERY small B cup while I carry all my weight down in my thighs/buttock area), which is unusual because all the women in my family are a C cup or higher... I've always thought that maybe I have low estrogen levels or high testosterone. I've never felt as "womanly" as I've wanted to, so I have considered taking spiro. My family has a history of diabetes. Do you think I should see a doctor? I've always been concerned about my breasts and my skin isn't getting much better. It's getting oilier and oilier and I'm almost 21 years old. Also, anytime I get a scratch, burn, or zit my skin deposits lots of pigment. So my face is really spotty and it's been that way ever since I could remember. Maybe it's because I'm pale but I notice other people don't get such prominent brown/red marks like me. It stays with me for years. I got sunburned on my chest two years ago and I can still see it when I look in the mirror!

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Check this out:

Hormone Therapy

Oral contraceptives may be a useful adjunctive therapy for all types of acne in women and adolescent girls. Sebum production is controlled by androgens, and oral contraceptives are known to reduce androgen levels by increasing sex hormone­binding globulin levels, thus reducing the availability of biologically active free testosterone.

The third-generation progestin norgestimate has lower intrinsic androgenicity than other currently available progestins7 and is effective in treating moderate inflammatory acne.8,9 Ortho Tri-Cyclen is a triphasic combination of norgestimate and ethinyl estradiol that has been labeled by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of acne vulgaris in women and adolescent girls. Other contraceptive agents that contain norgestimate (Ortho-Cyclen) or desogestrel (Desogen) are also reasonable choices. Two to four months of therapy may be required before improvement is seen, and relapses are common if medication is discontinued.

Inflammatory acne often requires treatment with oral antibiotics.

Adult women who present with acne in conjunction with hirsutism, alopecia or menstrual disturbances should be examined for the possibility of ovarian or adrenal hyperandrogenism.10,11 Basic screening tests include measurement of free testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-S) levels and the luteinizing hormone/follicle-stimulating hormone (LH/FSH) ratio. An elevated serum free testosterone level indicates a hyperandrogenous state of adrenal or ovarian origin; an increased DHEA-S level suggests adrenal hyperandrogenism and an LH/FSH ratio of greater than 3 suggests polycystic ovary syndrome. Consultation with an endocrinologist may be helpful in treating these conditions. Recalcitrant acne may respond to treatment with isotretinoin, low androgenic progestin oral contraceptives or other antiandrogens, such as spironolactone (Aldactone).11-13

Although not labeled by the FDA for treatment of acne, spironolactone, at dosages of 100 to 200 mg daily, may be effective in treating acne vulgaris in most women and adolescent girls; frequent adverse effects include menstrual irregularities, breast tenderness and fatigue.14 Hyperkalemia is rarely a problem in adolescents taking spironolactone for acne.14

**Read the highlighted area above. It would seem that, even if you get tested and diagnosed with these problems, the treatment is still the same that we've been talking about: Accutane, Birth control pills (some are better than others), and Aldactone (spironolactone). In fact, it would appear that the dosage of the spiro would be much, much higher than what Cyndotcom is taking and at least double what I'm taking. The point is, the treatment is still the same.**

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I wonder if there is a correlation between hormonal acne and facial hair growth for females. I noticed that the peach fuzz on my face has been increasing. It has not been darkening but on my chin I have a ton of little short fine hairs, and consequently lots of acne there. If it worsens I am definitely going to go in and see if my hormones are unbalanced.

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I think there might be a correllation. But it looks as though they will still treat it the same way we've been discussing: with birth control pills, spironolactone or accutane.

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I never had any increase in breast size since I started using Aldactone and I am on a very high dose, but that is a good thing because I am already a D anyway.

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