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High Cholesterol, Accutane

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Tomorrow I'm having another blood test for my second month of Accutane. I'm worried because last time the results releaved that I had a high cholesterol. I think that my diet is in check but I hear that it raises once your on Accutane. If I fast longer than 12 hours would that help? Thanks (male, 105-110 pounds, 15)

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I'm not familiar with the effects of Accutane, but realize that diets high in saturated animal fats, transfats, and processed carbs lead to your body making high LDL and low HDL (that's very bad. HDL - good. LDL - bad).

Dietary cholesterol hardly does anything to LDL and HDL. Cutting it out of your diet completely will slow hormone production.

It's just like that common misconception that fat makes you fat. Don't fall for it.

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If I fast longer than 12 hours would that help? Thanks (male, 105-110 pounds, 15)

No. Fasting will only give an accurate result of your actual cholesterol level. The reason why you fast is that some things you eat can skew the results.

But you can't just make your cholesterol level drop several points inside of a few days.

Sometimes, elevated cholesterol may have nothing to do with diet and everything to do with heredity.

However, if you eat a high cholesterol diet, especially one with a lot of "bad cholesterol" you should consider eating healthier for the long run.

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If I fast longer than 12 hours would that help? Thanks (male, 105-110 pounds, 15)

No. Fasting will only give an accurate result of your actual cholesterol level. The reason why you fast is that some things you eat can skew the results.

But you can't just make your cholesterol level drop several points inside of a few days.

Sometimes, elevated cholesterol may have nothing to do with diet and everything to do with heredity.

However, if you eat a high cholesterol diet, especially one with a lot of "bad cholesterol" you should consider eating healthier for the long run.

*sigh* lol

Dietary cholesterol has nearly no impact on blood cholesterol. Most blood cholesterol is manufactured by your body (liver) when you consume things like very saturated fats (mass produced bacon or beef).

Many body builders eat lean beef and eggs. They don't contain many saturated fats, but they're loaded with dietary cholesterol.

Yeah, there's some genetic diseases out there, but it's very uncommon. Not common enough for me to have to watch Crestor commercials every week. And some people may naturally have high cholesterol and it be fine.

There's so many things you can do to lower cholesterol. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, wild salmon, healthy oils (EVOO, nuts, flax, seeds, etc), teas (green tea is exceptional), etc.

Regarding Cholesterol:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cholesterol

Most cholesterol is not dietary in origin; it is synthesized internally. Cholesterol is present in higher concentrations in tissues which either produce more or have more densely-packed membranes, for example, the liver, spinal cord and brain, and also in atheroma.

Regarding Wild Salmon:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=104

Cardiovascular Benefits

The omega-3 fats found in salmon have a broad array of beneficial cardiovascular effects. Omega-3s help prevent erratic heart rhythms, make blood less likely to clot inside arteries (the proximate cause of most heart attacks and strokes), improve the ratio of good cholesterol to bad cholesterol, and prevent cholesterol from becoming damaged. (Only after cholesterol has been damaged does it clog arteries.)

Regarding EVOO:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=132

Heart Health

Studies on olive oil and atherosclerosis reveal that particles of LDL cholesterol (the potentially harmful cholesterol) that contain the monounsaturated fats of olive oil are less likely to become oxidized. Since only oxidized cholesterol sticks to artery walls, eventually forming the plaques that can lead to a heart attack or stroke, preventing the oxidation of cholesterol is a good way to help prevent atherosclerosis. A recent in vitro study also showed that polyphenolic compounds present in olive oil, including oleuropein, inhibit the adhesion of monocyte cells to the blood vessel lining, a process that is involved in the development of atherosclerosis. In addition, when people with high cholesterol levels removed the saturated fat from their diets and replaced it with olive oil, their total cholesterol levels dropped an average of 13.4%, and their LDL cholesterol levels dropped by 18%. Note, however, that these benefits occured when they used olive oil in place of other fats, rather than simply adding olive oil to a diet high in unhealthy fats.

A study published in the March 2004 issue of Medical Science Monitor reported that 2 tablespoons a day of olive oil added to an otherwise unchanged diet in 28 outpatients, ranging in age from 64 to 71, resulted in significant drops in total- and LDL cholesterol. Mean concentrations of total cholesterol were lowered by 0.818 mmol/L, and mean concentrations of LDL dropped 0.782 mmol/L. Plus, subjects ratio of HDL:LDL greatly improved; they ended up with higher amounts of protective HDL in relation to lower amounts of dangerous LDL cholesterol.

Three other recent studies (Valavanidis et al.; Morella et al.; Masella et al., see references below) suggest that such heart-healthy effects from olive oil are due not only to its high content of monounsaturated fats, but also to its hefty concentration of antioxidants, including chlorophyll, carotenoids and the polyphenolic compounds tyrosol, hydrotyrosol and oleuropein—all of which not only have free radical scavenging abilities, but protect the vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) also found in olive oil.

Greek scientists at the University of Athens reporting their research in the April 2004 issue of the Journal of Agriculture and Food Chemistry believe the synergy of all these beneficial nutrients is what is responsible for olive oil’s contribution to the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet, a hypothesis supported by Italian research published in the April 2004 issue of the Journal of Nutrition.

In this study, scientists found that the phenols in olive oil have very potent antioxidant effects. The protective effects exerted by extra virgin olive oil biophenols, namely, protocatechuic acid and oleuropein, against LDL oxidation included:

* completely preventing LDL’s oxidation when placed in a medium containing macrophage-like cells (in the arteries, arteriosclerosis begins when macrophages damage LDL, starting the development of foam cells that infiltrate the lining of the artery and begin plaque formation)

* inhibiting the production of two powerful oxidants that would normally have been produced and would have damaged LDL, thus preventing the expected decrease in glutathione, a powerful antioxidant the body produces to disarm oxidants (also called free radicals)

* restoring to normal levels the protective activities of two free radical-disarming enzymes that contain glutathione: glutathione reductase and glutathione peroxidase

* inducing higher than normal production and activity of both of these glutathione-containing enzymes.

Regarding Green Tea:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=146

Inhibits Atherosclerosis

Green tea has been shown to effectively lower risk of atherosclerosis by lowering LDL cholesterol, triglycerides, lipid peroxides (free radicals that damage LDL cholesterol and other lipids or fats) and fibrinogen (a protein in the blood involved in the formation of blood clots), while improving the ratio of LDL (bad) to HDL (good) cholesterol. In animal studies in which green tea was given in human equivalent doses to hamsters, atherosclerosis was inhibited 26-46% in those receiving the lower dose (equivalent in humans to 3-4 cups per day) , and 48-63% in those receiving the higher dose (10 cups a day in humans).

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No. Fasting will only give an accurate result of your actual cholesterol level. The reason why you fast is that some things you eat can skew the results.

But you can't just make your cholesterol level drop several points inside of a few days.Sometimes, elevated cholesterol may have nothing to do with diet and everything to do with heredity.

However, if you eat a high cholesterol diet, especially one with a lot of "bad cholesterol" you should consider eating healthier for the long run.

*sigh* lol

Dietary cholesterol has nearly no impact on blood cholesterol. Most blood cholesterol is manufactured by your body (liver) when you consume things like very saturated fats (mass produced bacon or beef).

There's so many things you can do to lower cholesterol. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, wild salmon, healthy oils (EVOO, nuts, flax, seeds, etc), teas (green tea is exceptional), etc.

What did I say that is in conflict with what you said?

The reason why they want you to fast for 12 hours before a fasting blood test is because certain things (a lot of thngs) you eat or drink can and do skew the blood test results, thereby not giving you accurate levels. That's a fact. I have been told that by many, many, many different doctors, nurses, lab techs, etc. for years and years and years.

And no, fasting for 24 hours will not give you any different results than fasting for 12 hours, other than maybe making your blood sugar lower. You'll just be hungrier.

My last sentence about diet, how is that in conflict with what you said?: "There's so many things you can do to lower cholesterol. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, wild salmon, healthy oils (EVOO, nuts, flax, seeds, etc), teas (green tea is exceptional), etc."

It's only what the heart association and, oh, every fucking doctor I've ever met, has been telling us for years and years and years.

A healthy, well-balanced diet that is not high in saturated fats and "bad" cholesterol for the long term is what will lower cholesterol. Not just fasting for a couple days.

With regard to heredity and high cholesterol. It happens. I had a friend in college who's mother had a cholesterol level in the 400s and hers was in the high 200s and she was only 19. She followed a very strict diet her doctor put her on for well over two years and could not bring it down. She had to go on medication to lower it. The kid who started this thread is young and doesn't weigh very much -- it could possibly be hereditary. It could be the accutane. It could be diet. It could be a combination of any of the above.

.

From the American Heart Association website:

Cholesterol can be both good and bad, so it's important to learn what cholesterol is, how it affects your health and how to manage your blood cholesterol levels. Understanding the facts about cholesterol will help you take better care of your heart and live a healthier life, reducing your risk for heart attack and stroke.

To control your cholesterol, get a cholesterol screening, eat foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol, maintain a healthy weight, exercise regularly and follow all your healthcare professional's recommendations.

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Tomorrow I'm having another blood test for my second month of Accutane. I'm worried because last time the results releaved that I had a high cholesterol. I think that my diet is in check but I hear that it raises once your on Accutane. If I fast longer than 12 hours would that help? Thanks (male, 105-110 pounds, 15)

Accutane is known for temporarilyraising cholesterol levels and also temporarilymaking people Insulin Resistant, and for some people this may exacerbate an already existing condition. However, both of these signs are associated with hormonal problems and can be linked to acne...go figure. Anyway, if you wanted to alter your total cholesterol levels you would have to change your diet 1 - 2 weeks before taking the test, otherwise it won't matter what you do today or tomorrow, so if there was something you wanted to eat...go ahead! :cool:

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Don't try to fool the blood exam. If your derm takes you off of accutane because it's messing with your cholesterol levels, I'm sure there is a damn good reason to do so.

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No. Fasting will only give an accurate result of your actual cholesterol level. The reason why you fast is that some things you eat can skew the results.

But you can't just make your cholesterol level drop several points inside of a few days.Sometimes, elevated cholesterol may have nothing to do with diet and everything to do with heredity.

However, if you eat a high cholesterol diet, especially one with a lot of "bad cholesterol" you should consider eating healthier for the long run.

*sigh* lol

Dietary cholesterol has nearly no impact on blood cholesterol. Most blood cholesterol is manufactured by your body (liver) when you consume things like very saturated fats (mass produced bacon or beef).

There's so many things you can do to lower cholesterol. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, wild salmon, healthy oils (EVOO, nuts, flax, seeds, etc), teas (green tea is exceptional), etc.

What did I say that is in conflict with what you said?

The reason why they want you to fast for 12 hours before a fasting blood test is because certain things (a lot of thngs) you eat or drink can and do skew the blood test results, thereby not giving you accurate levels. That's a fact. I have been told that by many, many, many different doctors, nurses, lab techs, etc. for years and years and years.

And no, fasting for 24 hours will not give you any different results than fasting for 12 hours, other than maybe making your blood sugar lower. You'll just be hungrier.

My last sentence about diet, how is that in conflict with what you said?: "There's so many things you can do to lower cholesterol. Eat a diet rich in whole grains, fruits, vegetables, wild salmon, healthy oils (EVOO, nuts, flax, seeds, etc), teas (green tea is exceptional), etc."

It's only what the heart association and, oh, every fucking doctor I've ever met, has been telling us for years and years and years.

A healthy, well-balanced diet that is not high in saturated fats and "bad" cholesterol for the long term is what will lower cholesterol. Not just fasting for a couple days.

With regard to heredity and high cholesterol. It happens. I had a friend in college who's mother had a cholesterol level in the 400s and hers was in the high 200s and she was only 19. She followed a very strict diet her doctor put her on for well over two years and could not bring it down. She had to go on medication to lower it. The kid who started this thread is young and doesn't weigh very much -- it could possibly be hereditary. It could be the accutane. It could be diet. It could be a combination of any of the above.

.

From the American Heart Association website:

Cholesterol can be both good and bad, so it's important to learn what cholesterol is, how it affects your health and how to manage your blood cholesterol levels. Understanding the facts about cholesterol will help you take better care of your heart and live a healthier life, reducing your risk for heart attack and stroke.

To control your cholesterol, get a cholesterol screening, eat foods low in saturated fat and cholesterol, maintain a healthy weight, exercise regularly and follow all your healthcare professional's recommendations.

What conflicts is you said to look out for high cholesterol foods. You never mentioned saturated fat foods. And that's simply wrong because the majority of blood cholesterol is manufactured by your body (i've heard around 2/3 to 80%). That's why things like lean beef and wild range eggs, which are high in cholesterol, do not increase blood cholesterol significantly.

It's terrible advice, and it shows that you clearly do not know what you're talking about. Now you know. I'm not trying to come off as an ass, it's just annoying that this misconception continues like I mentioned in my first post. Saying watch out for high saturated fat and cholesterol foods would be fine because cholesterol can have a very small impact on blood cholesterol.

The foods I posted don't really go against what you said, but I could add lean beef and eggs. Then it would, but it wouldn't raise blood cholesterol despite the high dietary cholesterol. I didn't mention them because I was aiming for foods that help the heart/cholesterol situation. Not foods that merely lack the biggest cause of high cholesterol.

See whfood's eggs article. You'll find references at the bottom of the page:

http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=foodspice&dbid=92

Eggs are high in cholesterol, and health experts in the past counseled people to therefore avoid this food. (All of the cholesterol in the egg is in the yolk.) However, nutrition experts have now determined people on a low-fat diet can eat one or two eggs a day without measurable changes in their blood cholesterol levels. This information is supported by a statistical analysis of 224 dietary studies carried out over the past 25 years that investigated the relationship between diet and blood cholesterol levels in over 8,000 subjects. What investigators in this study found was that saturated fat in the diet, not dietary cholesterol, is what influences blood cholesterol levels the most.

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What conflicts is you said to look out for high cholesterol foods. You never mentioned saturated fat foods. And that's simply wrong because the majority of blood cholesterol is manufactured by your body (i've heard around 2/3 to 80%). That's why things like lean beef and wild range eggs, which are high in cholesterol, do not increase blood cholesterol significantly.

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What made the advice bad is that you implied that dietary cholesterol is the main cause for blood cholesterol. That he should eat healthy with respect to cholesterol levels is to avoid eating bad cholesterol. Had he followed the advice, he would have looked at the wrong qualities of food. It's not nick picky when saturated fat is the biggest factor to blood cholesterol.

I'm not saying that you're mean spirited or anything. Just that the misconception that you implied could have had serious implications on his health.

The reason why I talked about eggs:

You bolded the food types I recommended and then asked how does it conflict with what you said. So I realized that none of the foods I listed had significant dietary cholesterol. The point of talking about lean beef and eggs was to give examples of healthy foods that are high in dietary cholesterol. Eggs specifically had a study talking about how dietary cholesterol was insignificant when compared to saturated fats (the part I bolded).

Now before I demonize saturated fats, I do think you need some each day. And I think I read something about palm oil saturated fats not acting like bacon saturated fats.

SweetJade1980 appears to have properly answered the question already. lol

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What made the advice bad is that you implied that dietary cholesterol is the main cause for blood cholesterol. That he should eat healthy with respect to cholesterol levels is to avoid eating bad cholesterol. Had he followed the advice, he would have looked at the wrong qualities of food. It's not nick picky when saturated fat is the biggest factor to blood cholesterol.

I'm not saying that you're mean spirited or anything. Just that the misconception that you implied could have had serious implications on his health.

Bad advice is telling people to get wasted on accutane. Bad advice is telling people it's a good idea to OD on B5 or vitamin A to clear up their acne. Bad advice is telling people to eat only candy and take those brocolli pills to make up for the vitamins and minerals they didn't get from the candy. Telling someone to watch their cholesterol level isn't bad advice. I simply didn't add the part of watching saturated fat intake.

An "implied misconception" leading to "serious implications on his health" by saying hey, watch that cholesterol intake and eat healthy long term?

You are going overboard. You're on a tangent and you are nitpicking. On me. For forgetting two words. The general message is still the same: eat healthy all of the time, not just for the short term. You are getting hung up on one tiny thing I said and blowing it out of proportion. Isn't there some other thread discussing bizarre, radical dietary advice that you could attack instead of me?

Again. The kid said he had high cholesterol level last time and was worried what his blood test would show this time. He was wondering if he could fast a little longer in order to reduce the cholesterol level on his blood test. Me and several other people told him nothing he does only a few days before the blood test will lower his cholesterol. I pointed out that the reason the blood test is a fasting blood test is so that anything ingested just prior to the test won't skew the results, as can happen. I pointed out that if he wants his cholesterol level to go down, to eat healthier in the long run. I mentioned bad cholesterol intake and not saturated fats. My bad.

And I'll ask you again: Since you are obviously the self proclaimed expert on the subject of cholesterol and saturated fats, perhaps you could give the kid who asked the original question some insight to a lipid panel, explaining in detail what each level indicates and where the normal range for his age is. Explain it to HIM instead of focusing your attacks on me.

Accutane is known for temporarilyraising cholesterol levels and also temporarilymaking people Insulin Resistant, and for some people this may exacerbate an already existing condition. However, both of these signs are associated with hormonal problems and can be linked to acne...go figure. Anyway, if you wanted to alter your total cholesterol levels you would have to change your diet 1 - 2 weeks before taking the test, otherwise it won't matter what you do today or tomorrow, so if there was something you wanted to eat...go ahead! :cool:

Legend,

Telling someone to change their diet two weeks before a test to alter their cholesterol and then telling them to eat whatever they want is sage advice but telling someone to eat healthy for life and watch that cholesterol intake (failing to mention those saturated fats) is terrible advice?

See, now I think you are just picking a fight with me to get a rise. I see from your # of posts that you're new. Put the two together and it smells a little bit trolly.

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Accutane is known for temporarilyraising cholesterol levels and also temporarilymaking people Insulin Resistant, and for some people this may exacerbate an already existing condition. However, both of these signs are associated with hormonal problems and can be linked to acne...go figure. Anyway, if you wanted to alter your total cholesterol levels you would have to change your diet 1 - 2 weeks before taking the test, otherwise it won't matter what you do today or tomorrow, so if there was something you wanted to eat...go ahead! :cool:

Legend,

Telling someone to change their diet two weeks before a test to alter their cholesterol and then telling them to eat whatever they want is sage advice but telling someone to eat healthy for life and watch that cholesterol intake (failing to mention those saturated fats) is terrible advice?

See, now I think you are just picking a fight with me to get a rise. I see from your # of posts that you're new. Put the two together and it smells a little bit trolly.

LOL, I certainly hope that is not what he's saying....nor was that my intention. I was simply stating that the last time I took my total cholesterol, I fasted and learned that it wasn't neccessary because it wouldn't affect my current levels. Then the women told all of us, if we wanted to positively change the results of our test, then we would have to eaten better at least a few weeks prior. Either way, I was below 150 ng/dl (that's as low as it would read) so I didn't have to worry about what I ate (not always willingly) in Las Vegas, but total cholesterol is still not indicative of our HDL/LDL ratios. Furthermore, considering the above, if she wanted to eat fried chicken or crab legs the day before I really don't see how this would be an issue...in regards to this particular blood test. Yet overall, if we expect to be healthy, deal with our hormonal issues, acne etc....we can't eat "whatever we want"....especially if it does not agree with us.

Take care ;)

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What made the advice bad is that you implied that dietary cholesterol is the main cause for blood cholesterol. That he should eat healthy with respect to cholesterol levels is to avoid eating bad cholesterol. Had he followed the advice, he would have looked at the wrong qualities of food. It's not nick picky when saturated fat is the biggest factor to blood cholesterol.

I'm not saying that you're mean spirited or anything. Just that the misconception that you implied could have had serious implications on his health.

Bad advice is telling people to get wasted on accutane. Bad advice is telling people it's a good idea to OD on B5 or vitamin A to clear up their acne. Bad advice is telling people to eat only candy and take those brocolli pills to make up for the vitamins and minerals they didn't get from the candy. Telling someone to watch their cholesterol level isn't bad advice. I simply didn't add the part of watching saturated fat intake.

An "implied misconception" leading to "serious implications on his health" by saying hey, watch that cholesterol intake and eat healthy long term?

You are going overboard. You're on a tangent and you are nitpicking. On me. For forgetting two words. The general message is still the same: eat healthy all of the time, not just for the short term. You are getting hung up on one tiny thing I said and blowing it out of proportion. Isn't there some other thread discussing bizarre, radical dietary advice that you could attack instead of me?

Again. The kid said he had high cholesterol level last time and was worried what his blood test would show this time. He was wondering if he could fast a little longer in order to reduce the cholesterol level on his blood test. Me and several other people told him nothing he does only a few days before the blood test will lower his cholesterol. I pointed out that the reason the blood test is a fasting blood test is so that anything ingested just prior to the test won't skew the results, as can happen. I pointed out that if he wants his cholesterol level to go down, to eat healthier in the long run. I mentioned bad cholesterol intake and not saturated fats. My bad.

And I'll ask you again: Since you are obviously the self proclaimed expert on the subject of cholesterol and saturated fats, perhaps you could give the kid who asked the original question some insight to a lipid panel, explaining in detail what each level indicates and where the normal range for his age is. Explain it to HIM instead of focusing your attacks on me.

Accutane is known for temporarilyraising cholesterol levels and also temporarilymaking people Insulin Resistant, and for some people this may exacerbate an already existing condition. However, both of these signs are associated with hormonal problems and can be linked to acne...go figure. Anyway, if you wanted to alter your total cholesterol levels you would have to change your diet 1 - 2 weeks before taking the test, otherwise it won't matter what you do today or tomorrow, so if there was something you wanted to eat...go ahead! :cool:

Legend,

Telling someone to change their diet two weeks before a test to alter their cholesterol and then telling them to eat whatever they want is sage advice but telling someone to eat healthy for life and watch that cholesterol intake (failing to mention those saturated fats) is terrible advice?

See, now I think you are just picking a fight with me to get a rise. I see from your # of posts that you're new. Put the two together and it smells a little bit trolly.

I never attacked you. I attacked part of your advice. I just was trying to clarify what to look for to help give him healthy cholesterol levels.

I never claimed to be an expert, and I said that in my first post which was before you entered the thread. Part of the reason why I went on a rant was because I mentioned the misconception of high dietary cholesterol, and then you posted about high cholesterol foods right after that.

I never made any advice about short term diet changes. I'm strongly opposed to the concept of diets. I believe in permanent healthy eating.

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Well there's a lot of things to read in this topic, cholesterol, among other things I didn't ask. Thanks to everyone that's posted, I appreciate the help. I'm now going to start reading up on things.

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I believe in permanent healthy eating.

mmhm, yes, which was pretty much what I said: Eat a healthy diet long term. If we are in agreement on this, why is it terrible advice? Long term certainly is more permanant that it is temporary, isn't it?

:)

BTW, the word dietdoesn't just refer to some short term gimmick for the purpose of losing weight. The word diet aslo has these definitions, amongh others:

The usual food and drink of a person or animal.

To eat and drink according to a regulated system.

[Middle English diete, from Old French, from Latin diaeta, way of living, diet, from Greek diaita, back-formation from diaitsthai, to live one's life, middle voice of diaitn, to treat.]

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Well there's a lot of things to read in this topic, cholesterol, among other things I didn't ask. Thanks to everyone that's posted, I appreciate the help. I'm now going to start reading up on things.

Well, you did ask about cholesterol, so there ya go.

How many months have you been on Accutane and how many blood tests have you had. Was it only the last your cholesterol was high? Did your doctor have specific concerns about your lipid panel? Did he/she give any special instructions?

You're young so it actually is rather easy to ammend. When I was in college, the first semester that I lived off campus, my roommate and I ate a lot of red meat and we had a lot of bacon and egg breakfasts. I was also used to drinking whole milk as I did my whole life up to that point. So when I was due for my annual exam, my cholesterol level was checked and the nurse was concerned that it was so high for my age bracket, especially since I only weighed 105lbs and I was athletic. She gave me some dietary do's and don'ts and wanted me to come back in three months for a follow up. I switched to 1% milk, quit eating so many eggs (didn't cut them out) and cut back on the bacon and red meats. I can't remember how much my cholesterol dropped in just those few months by making just a few changes but it was significant. Ah, the advantages of youth.

As for a college friend of mine, she was on a very restricted diet and weighed even less than me, but extremely high cholesterol was hereditary and so nothing she did could change it. She eventually had to take an oral medication for it.

But no doubt, accutane can cause a slight increase in your cholesterol level but it shouldn't be a significant increase. Accutane can make many things elevate, not just cholesterol. SGOT (AST) and SGPT (ALT) are liver enzymes that are checked when you take accutane. The SGOT can become elevated by certain drug therapies, while the SGPT is specific to liver enzymes. Both are highly sensitive but you could see how a slight elevation in one would not be as much as a concern as the other. On blood tests, there is a normal range for everything and if you go outside of that range, either lower or higher, it's automatically red-flagged. Your doctor should review this can compare it to your baseline blood tests done at the beginning, just before you started treatment, as well as your medical and family history. Sometimes, you will be instructed to stop taking the medication a.s.a.p. until followup tests can be done to rule out other problems. But if the only thing that is elevated is the cholesterol and it isn't extremely high, it will probably just be monitored closely by your doctor while you continue with the accutane treatment.

:)

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I've been on Accutane for one month today! I failed to talk about my diet. Its been really tight with mostly chicken salads with lowfat dressing, and other healthy foods. (She only suggested that I stop eating so much fast food.) Anyway, so my derm called today with my cholesterol update, it has remained the same level. It makes me kinda mad since it didn't go down but anyway its another month on Accutane. If I'm correct my derm only requires two blood tests so I'm done!?!

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