Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
alisonjs122

Eating Yogurt is GOOD for your skin!

Recommended Posts

It's so weird- while milk and cheese (and ice cream) tend to be bad for skin, eating low sugar yogurt can actually help clear it due to the probiotics it contains. Just be sure to get the yogurt that's low fat with no added sugar- organic is best also because the cows aren't given hormones. I've been eating 3 yogurts a day and my skin is CLEAR!

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Gentle~Rain

It's so weird- while milk and cheese (and ice cream) tend to be bad for skin, eating low sugar yogurt can actually help clear it due to the probiotics it contains. Just be sure to get the yogurt that's low fat with no added sugar- organic is best also because the cows aren't given hormones. I've been eating 3 yogurts a day and my skin is CLEAR!

I love plain yogurt with sliced grapes and kiwi...yum.. or on a baked potato w/chives!!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Just be sure to get the yogurt that's low fat with no added sugar-

Why low fat? Butterfat appears to be good for you.

Bryan

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest Gentle~Rain

Just be sure to get the yogurt that's low fat with no added sugar-

Why low fat? Butterfat appears to be good for you.

Bryan

Less calories, maybe???

Link to post
Share on other sites

Well, if I personally were presented a choice of two different milk products having equal calories (one is a larger quantity having less fat, the other is a smaller quantity having more fat), I'd probably choose the full-fat product.

Bryan

Link to post
Share on other sites

True, I just suggested low fat for health reasons- full fat would be fine too. Just watch out for the sugar content; some have up to 40 grams per container!

Link to post
Share on other sites

What have I been saying forever! Yes, yogurt is delicious and good for you. It has to have live active cultures in it. Even better is homemade kefir, where if you ferment it for 3 days pretty much all of the lactose has been converted into healthy bacteria, so you not only get 0g sugar but way more probiotics.

You know what, I was thinking today. Wouldn't it be interesting to think that the whole "low fat / no fat milk is healthier for you" campaign was just a ploy to help dairy companies make more money as they remove the fat from milk and see you skim milk, then sell the fat right back to you in the form of butter? Seems like a good business plan to me haha.

I think the argument is that dairy fat is not only needed for the utilization of calcium in the body, but it also slows down the absorbsion of lactose prompting less of an insulin response, on top of that helping with the metabolism of proteins. But I'm not positive about that, so maybe someone else could fill me in. Either way, I've switched to whole milk yogurt and whole milk kefir :)

Link to post
Share on other sites

where i am in argentina we dont have just PLAIN yogurt. the other day while i was on a 20 hour bus ride i ate 2 vanilla yogurts (thinking it might be ok cuz it wasnt low fat or anything) and broke out badly. maybe when i get back to the states ill try organic plain yogurt.

Link to post
Share on other sites

What have I been saying forever! Yes, yogurt is delicious and good for you. It has to have live active cultures in it. Even better is homemade kefir, where if you ferment it for 3 days pretty much all of the lactose has been converted into healthy bacteria, so you not only get 0g sugar but way more probiotics.

You know what, I was thinking today. Wouldn't it be interesting to think that the whole "low fat / no fat milk is healthier for you" campaign was just a ploy to help dairy companies make more money as they remove the fat from milk and see you skim milk, then sell the fat right back to you in the form of butter? Seems like a good business plan to me haha.

I think the argument is that dairy fat is not only needed for the utilization of calcium in the body, but it also slows down the absorbsion of lactose prompting less of an insulin response, on top of that helping with the metabolism of proteins. But I'm not positive about that, so maybe someone else could fill me in. Either way, I've switched to whole milk yogurt and whole milk kefir :)

A lot of fats are actually good for you. They bind themselves to the good stuff and aid in digestion into your body. The problem with "whole" milk is the saturated fat (5g in comparison to 0g in skim; the daily allowance for saturated is like 19). So whole milk does more harm than good.

Fat isn't bad, in and of itself. We all need to learn the differences between the different fats, because some fats are very important to your health.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It can actually be debated that the fats in milk, though saturated, are good for you. First of all, the 'all saturated fats are bad' idealogy is a lie, scam and myth. Humans have been eating full fat dairy for centuries, even milleniums. The cows were healthier then - but I don't use anything other then organic for dairy. On a side note, if cows are fed grass and allowed to graze freely, they will actually have omega 3 fatty acids, the 'good fats', in their meat and milk. Back to saturated fats - they are necessary to health. It's the amount and type that matters. Short and medium chain fatty acids, found in coconut oil, butter, etc. are very good for you. Research lauric acid, capric acid, butyric acid, and caprylic acid. The last one is used as an antifungal in candida treatment. These are all saturated fats, though very healthy. Long and extra long chain saturated fats I suppose are needed by the body though in very small amounts. You find these in meats.

Once again though, skim milk is a scam. Fat in milk is needed for the absorbsion of calcium. Middle aged women still get osteoporsis despite their milk consumption, and one of the suspected reasons is skim milk is to blame. Not only that, but in the acne-milk study conducted not that long ago that compared milk consumption to acne severity, the most severe acne was found in women consuming skim milk, not lowfat or whole. So I believe skim milk is very detrimental in our case.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It can actually be debated that the fats in milk, though saturated, are good for you. First of all, the 'all saturated fats are bad' idealogy is a lie, scam and myth. Humans have been eating full fat dairy for centuries, even milleniums. The cows were healthier then - but I don't use anything other then organic for dairy. On a side note, if cows are fed grass and allowed to graze freely, they will actually have omega 3 fatty acids, the 'good fats', in their meat and milk. Back to saturated fats - they are necessary to health. It's the amount and type that matters. Short and medium chain fatty acids, found in coconut oil, butter, etc. are very good for you. Research lauric acid, capric acid, butyric acid, and caprylic acid. The last one is used as an antifungal in candida treatment. These are all saturated fats, though very healthy. Long and extra long chain saturated fats I suppose are needed by the body though in very small amounts. You find these in meats.

Once again though, skim milk is a scam. Fat in milk is needed for the absorbsion of calcium. Middle aged women still get osteoporsis despite their milk consumption, and one of the suspected reasons is skim milk is to blame. Not only that, but in the acne-milk study conducted not that long ago that compared milk consumption to acne severity, the most severe acne was found in women consuming skim milk, not lowfat or whole. So I believe skim milk is very detrimental in our case.

I agree with everything said here. Also, I have noticed that I seem to tolerate plain whole milk yogurt but low-fat and fat-free yogurts don't do well in my system. I remember reading somewhere that non-fat dry milk powder is a really crappy and unnatural product and should be avoided. Interestingly, it is added to most low-fat and fat-free yogurts.

Link to post
Share on other sites

It can actually be debated that the fats in milk, though saturated, are good for you. First of all, the 'all saturated fats are bad' idealogy is a lie, scam and myth. Humans have been eating full fat dairy for centuries, even milleniums.

Indeed. It amuses me that people nowadays are so apt to believe that Mother Nature somehow made a "mistake" when designing milk: all that nasty ol' saturated fat is in there, so we need to CORRECT that mistake by removing it all (skim milk) or most of it (2% milk). But is it possible that the butterfat is in there for a REASON?? :think:

Everyone should read the terrific book "Nutrition Against Disease", by the famous biochemist Roger J. Williams. For those of you aren't familiar with him, he's the scientist who discovered pantothenic acid (think of all those nut-cases on this site who take huge amounts of pantothenic acid...I guess they owe a debt of gratitude to Dr. Williams! ;) ), gave folic acid its name, and did numerous other original work with vitamins in his career.

Williams has a lot of material on milk in his book, far more than I can quote here. But here are a few selected statements, culled primarily from the chapter on heart disease (added emphasis with italics is Williams' own): "...These data suggest that adequate whole milk, including the butterfat, and essential trace minerals actually protect against cardiovascular damage. This, we have noted, concurs with other findings of the African tribes who live on a diet of raw whole cow's and goat's milk, a 60 to 65 percent butterfat diet, yet are virtually free of coronary heart disease. According to Dreizen and his colleagues, not only was the saturated butterfat of whole milk not to blame, but its inclusion in the diet was vital to the health of the cardiovascular system. It was the lack of adequate nutrients in a diet totally free of fat that caused medical atherosclerosis and renal damage. Butterfat, itself, appears to protect against atherosclerosis! More material on this subject will be presented later. [....] Moreover, in the above cited studies by Denizen and his coworkers, we noted that nonfat dry milk produced atherosclerosis in rats, while milk with added butterfat did not. Thus, we must question the wisdom of the current fad of removing the butterfat from milk. [...] Returning to the more immediate question of butterfat, calcium metabolism, and atherosclerosis, we have found, from above-cited studies, that a sufficient amount of butterfat enhances calcium absorption. Other studies have shown that serum cholesterol levels are elevated by calcium deficiency and are kept at normal levels by adequate calcium in the diet...In view of the fact that (1) milk and dairy products provide 75% of the calcium in the American diet, (2) butterfat is vital to adequate calcium absorption, and (3) calcium deficiency may contribute to atherosclerosis, it is suggested that adequate amounts of whole milk be recommended."

Bryan

Link to post
Share on other sites

The bad thing with commercially produced yoghurt is that it's pasteurised. That means that most of the probiotics in the yoghurt are killed in the process. Home made yoghurt is a different thing and contains an adequate amount of probiotic bacteria to make a difference.

Link to post
Share on other sites

The bad thing with commercially produced yoghurt is that it's pasteurised. That means that most of the probiotics in the yoghurt are killed in the process. Home made yoghurt is a different thing and contains an adequate amount of probiotic bacteria to make a difference.

Try to find Nancy's Organic Yogurt, it's made in a town just a couple hours from my city but according to their site it's carried nationally. Anyways, it's been about the best yogurt I can find.

The milk that yogurt is fermented with is pasteurized. If the manufacturer is smart, they pasteurize the milk THEN ferment it, leaving the cultures alive and well (and hopefully still intact after the shipping process).

Link to post
Share on other sites

One thing, although Dannon and Stoneyfield yogurts meet the NYA(National Yogurt Association)'s criteria for LAC (Live active cultures), you have to remember...they are just cultures...not necessarily probiotics.

Case in point, Lactobacillus bulgaricus is a starter culture...dies very easily. So it does not fit into the criteria for "probiotic" since it dies well before reaching your intestines. But it is used to make yogurt and can only be considered a probiotic if it reaches your intestines successfully in a high rate.

Personally, I'd go with the Stoneyfield Farms organic plain yogurt. It is the most pure homogenized yogurt on the market as far as process and ingredients go. They also add a prebiotic to the yogurt as well.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×