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Avoiding dairy didn't have much effect when I did it for a couple months.

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I never liked milk anyways =P

Seriously though, I stopped drinking milk for the meantime. Kinda grossed out atm. Cheese? Nah, don't eat cheese too much either, grossed out too :S

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Avoiding dairy didn't have much effect when I did it for a couple months.

did u also avoid ice cream, also if you consume alcohol it can worsen your acne, as alcohol contains plenty of sugar, plenty and plenty more

how about soymilk though? is that just as bad or less worse or makes no difference?

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Milk and Cheese break me out, but cream/butter doesn't. Cream is basically liquid butter, just the fat of the milk. I buy organic heavy whipping cream. If I mix a little cream with water it is just like milk except I get no acne. So the milk proteins and lactose give me problems, but not the fat. With just some cream I can make all sorts of good recipes like creamed spinach or banana milk shakes.

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Avoiding dairy didn't have much effect when I did it for a couple months.

did u also avoid ice cream, also if you consume alcohol it can worsen your acne, as alcohol contains plenty of sugar, plenty and plenty more

how about soymilk though? is that just as bad or less worse or makes no difference?

Yes. With the exception of last night and maybe a few spread out times, I've barely had much ice cream since September. I just don't like it like I like other 'dessert' dishes. I spared cheese for the most part as well. Now I consume cheese and butter when I want, and make kefir out of organic whole milk / eat whole milk yogurt.

I was reading on Weston A. Price that the fat in milk is needed to utilize the proteins in your body, as well as slow down the absorbsion of lactose and help with calcium getting absorbed. Therefore it makes sense to eat full fat dairy but use less of it (excess animal based fats obviously aren't good, key word EXCESS). It also goes along with the whole 'undigested "dirty" proteins help cause acne' theory that I have no clue whether is true or not, but it couldn't hurt to try eating full fat dairy and see...

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I was reading on Weston A. Price that the fat in milk is needed to utilize the proteins in your body, as well as slow down the absorbsion of lactose and help with calcium getting absorbed. Therefore it makes sense to eat full fat dairy but use less of it (excess animal based fats obviously aren't good, key word EXCESS). It also goes along with the whole 'undigested "dirty" proteins help cause acne' theory that I have no clue whether is true or not, but it couldn't hurt to try eating full fat dairy and see...

I remember reading about a study about the connection between dairy and acne. It was found that there was a definite connection between low-fat milk and acne, but there was no connection between whole milk and acne. The hypothesis given was that perhaps the fat in the milk caused an estrogenic reaction. But maybe it is what you say, that the fats are need for protein digestion.

People are always scared to gain weight on full fat dairy, but generations ago everyone drank it that way and they were much thinner. I don't think they even got so much exercise. I know my great grandmothers stayed home cooking and raising kids for like 25 years.

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I was reading on Weston A. Price that the fat in milk is needed to utilize the proteins in your body, as well as slow down the absorbsion of lactose and help with calcium getting absorbed. Therefore it makes sense to eat full fat dairy but use less of it (excess animal based fats obviously aren't good, key word EXCESS). It also goes along with the whole 'undigested "dirty" proteins help cause acne' theory that I have no clue whether is true or not, but it couldn't hurt to try eating full fat dairy and see...

I remember reading about a study about the connection between dairy and acne. It was found that there was a definite connection between low-fat milk and acne, but there was no connection between whole milk and acne. The hypothesis given was that perhaps the fat in the milk caused an estrogenic reaction. But maybe it is what you say, that the fats are need for protein digestion.

People are always scared to gain weight on full fat dairy, but generations ago everyone drank it that way and they were much thinner. I don't think they even got so much exercise. I know my great grandmothers stayed home cooking and raising kids for like 25 years.

Hmm, that's interesting. For my Epidemiology class, I did my paper on the Milk-Acne study and if I recall they all had acne. Regular, Low-fat, and Skim Milk drinkers. However, those that were Skim Milk drinkers had a higher prevelance of acne than the other two types. It was suggested that it may have to do with the extra proteins in Skim Milk (to make it taste better? lol). So once again, it goes back to the proteins, but we just can't decide which protein(s) is causing acne for us....

A few years back, when I first changed my diet I was listening more so to the "Evil" Lectin Free Dieters and they said we could not have Grains, Legumes, Nightshades, BUT we could have High Fat Dairy. I looked that up and I figured it was Regular Fat Dairy, but perhaps I should have tried Heavy Cream instead, especially if it has less proteins and lactose.

Unfortunately, I'm quite sensitive to dairy products. I can tell I've consumed dairy, milk or butter, within minutes of ingestion, due to an increased production of (doesn't sound good) mucous in my throat and of course a few days later cysts to prove it. So I'm not certain if I'd be able to get away with Heavy Cream, but perhaps I'll look into that one day.

Take care ;)

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Yes. With the exception of last night and maybe a few spread out times, I've barely had much ice cream since September. I just don't like it like I like other 'dessert' dishes. I spared cheese for the most part as well. Now I consume cheese and butter when I want, and make kefir out of organic whole milk / eat whole milk yogurt.

I was reading on Weston A. Price that the fat in milk is needed to utilize the proteins in your body, as well as slow down the absorbsion of lactose and help with calcium getting absorbed. Therefore it makes sense to eat full fat dairy but use less of it (excess animal based fats obviously aren't good, key word EXCESS). It also goes along with the whole 'undigested "dirty" proteins help cause acne' theory that I have no clue whether is true or not, but it couldn't hurt to try eating full fat dairy and see...

Rubber sheep,

Does your homemade kefir thicken to the consistency of store-bought? I just started making it, and have been using raw goat milk, but it doesn't thicken. It stays the consistency of the milk. I know I read somewhere that refridgerating it made it thicken up, but mine didn't thicken even after a couple of days in the fridge. I'm not sure if it's the goat milk? I guess it will take some investigating. I'm just curious about your experience. I will ask Leah too, as I think she makes it with goat milk.

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Rubber sheep,

Does your homemade kefir thicken to the consistency of store-bought? I just started making it, and have been using raw goat milk, but it doesn't thicken. It stays the consistency of the milk. I know I read somewhere that refridgerating it made it thicken up, but mine didn't thicken even after a couple of days in the fridge. I'm not sure if it's the goat milk? I guess it will take some investigating. I'm just curious about your experience. I will ask Leah too, as I think she makes it with goat milk.

Hey,

Mine definitely doesn't get as thick as store-bought kefir. But I would say it's at least a little thicker than milk. If yours tastes okay then it should be fine. If you got grains that were kept in cow's milk it might take about a week for the grains to start making good kefir from goat's milk (but it's all edible).

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Hey,

Mine definitely doesn't get as thick as store-bought kefir. But I would say it's at least a little thicker than milk. If yours tastes okay then it should be fine. If you got grains that were kept in cow's milk it might take about a week for the grains to start making good kefir from goat's milk (but it's all edible).

Thanks, Leah. I'll just keep making it and see what happens. It just works so well in smoothies when it's thick. But I'll tolerate it, since I know all the goodies it's providing me with.

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I recently started drinking milk again. Typically I drank soy milk for the past 3 years, not for any reason other than I like the taste.

My acne is almost 100% under control as of now, but I'm still at the stage where I get an occasional zit or two. I don't breakout anymore(with 4 or 5 zits at a time in a constant cycle)

I have been trying to figure out what the last links are to having completely clear skin versus what I have now(clear, but still not fully treated)

I have started drinking milk again though, mostly because of the protein and calories for my workout program. I can't say that it has broken me out though. I will be paying attention.

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Rubber sheep,

Does your homemade kefir thicken to the consistency of store-bought? I just started making it, and have been using raw goat milk, but it doesn't thicken. It stays the consistency of the milk. I know I read somewhere that refridgerating it made it thicken up, but mine didn't thicken even after a couple of days in the fridge. I'm not sure if it's the goat milk? I guess it will take some investigating. I'm just curious about your experience. I will ask Leah too, as I think she makes it with goat milk.

Yeah, mine definitely doesn't get as thick as the Helios Kefir they sell in the store, but it's still thicker then regular milk, just like Leah's.

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Rubber sheep,

Does your homemade kefir thicken to the consistency of store-bought? I just started making it, and have been using raw goat milk, but it doesn't thicken. It stays the consistency of the milk. I know I read somewhere that refridgerating it made it thicken up, but mine didn't thicken even after a couple of days in the fridge. I'm not sure if it's the goat milk? I guess it will take some investigating. I'm just curious about your experience. I will ask Leah too, as I think she makes it with goat milk.

Yeah, mine definitely doesn't get as thick as the Helios Kefir they sell in the store, but it's still thicker then regular milk, just like Leah's.

Cool. Thanks. I just re-read the sheet of info the lady sent me with the grains. She says it will be a thin consistency. She wrote that you can make it in the fridge for a sweeter, thicker kefir, but it takes about a week.

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I like to ferment my kefir for a couple days instead of just one, and then add stevia to the final product. That way, there's very little lactose and way more good bacteria. I really think homemade kefir and high quality, organic plain yogurt has a lot more good bacteria per serving then any probiotic pill. I buy Nancy's Organic Yogurt, which is made only 2 hours away from where I live. On their website, this is what it says in the FAQ:

What is the actual culture count of your yogurt?

You will find billions of live cultures in every container of Nancy's cultured dairy and soy products. When we have had our yogurts tested in an independent laboratory, the results show our yogurt that is, for instance, 11 days old, has a total live bacterial count of 1,350,000,000 per 1/4 teaspoon. That's a lot of live culture! Keep in mind that as the product ages, the culture or bacteria count diminishes. Even so, toward the end of the product's life you can still expect about 300,000,000 live bacteria per 1/4 teaspoon.

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