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I've been using vitamincures vitamin a solution on my nose for a while to try to get rid of oil/blackheads, but i havent seen much improvement so 3 days ago i started putting a drop of the solution in my mouth each morning. Yes i know that Vitamin A can be extremely toxic in high doses. Each drop has 25,000iu's and the rda recommends no more than 5,000ius a day so for the past three days i have been taking 5 times the amount of vitamin a that is recommended. Today ive had really bad headaches (more like my eyes hurt causing my head to hurt). I'm wondering if its possible i could have allready overdosed on Vitamin A? Everywhere I've read it seems that studies show that taking more than 25,000ius of Vit. A for extended periods of times can cause serious problems. I've only been taking it for 3 days so do you think this is just a fluke? I'm not going to take a drop tomorrow morning and see what happens. Perhaps I will do it every other day.

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If you take too much vitamin A, you risk damaging your liver. You've taken a toxic amount and so no, you should not take that much every other day.

Call you doctor and ask him/her what the maximum you can take. You should have your blood drawn to make sure your liver functions are normal.

The thing is, if you are going this route, then just do Accutane -- it's far more effective and, believe it or not, much safer than what you are doing.

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Vitamin A overdose (esp Beta Carotene) may weaken the bones of older adults. Or at least thats what it says on my multivitamin bottle.

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Guest Dampfhammer

Yesterday, i've startet the same procedure with 50.000 i. u. vitamin a per day. I've read that dosages up to 300.000 i. u. for a couple of months are needed to get an toxication. So I think our dose will be alright. I will go on for a total of 3 days with 50.000 and then reduce step by step down to 10.000 i. u. It's a try, lets see what's gonna happen ...

greetings from Germany ...

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"The thing is, if you are going this route, then just do Accutane -- it's far more effective and, believe it or not, much safer than what you are doing."

Actually it is almost the same thing. Overdosing on vitamin A is the same as taking isotretinoin (roaccutane). That's the idea. Isotretinoin is a derivative of vitamin A, but is more selective to your retinoic skin receptors. Have a guess at one of the many side effects of vitamin A overdose? Shrinkage of your pores, including less subum production. So you may as well be taking roaccutane. Because it's cheaper, not safer.

Also you're looking at this on a day-by-day basis. That won't work. It takes weeks to have any effect at all. And I have read people trying to use vitamin A instead of roaccutane, but they mainly used 50,000 IU's a day. The other side effects will be soore eyes, headache, dry skin/lips/eyes, frail bones and the list goes on...

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I've been taking beta carotene for months and I was somewhat breakout free for a little, but once i stopped taking it, I immediately got 3 whiteheads. This is probably coincidence, since the time I started taking it is the same time I only got 2 hours of sleep a night for finals.

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Guest Dampfhammer

"The thing is, if you are going this route, then just do Accutane -- it's far more effective and, believe it or not, much safer than what you are doing."

Actually it is almost the same thing. Overdosing on vitamin A is the same as taking isotretinoin (roaccutane). That's the idea. Isotretinoin is a derivative of vitamin A, but is more selective to your retinoic skin receptors. Have a guess at one of the many side effects of vitamin A overdose? Shrinkage of your pores, including less subum production. So you may as well be taking roaccutane. Because it's cheaper, not safer.

Also you're looking at this on a day-by-day basis. That won't work. It takes weeks to have any effect at all. And I have read people trying to use vitamin A instead of roaccutane, but they mainly used 50,000 IU's a day. The other side effects will be soore eyes, headache, dry skin/lips/eyes, frail bones and the list goes on...

I was on roaccutane for about two jears 2001 and 2002 with a short break between. And I can say, that the side effects are nearly the same, so I dont care about that point. Now in 2006 I have chosen vitamin-a for therapy because of the high price of roaccutane in germany. And my health insurance won't pay again for this medication the thirt time. Vitamin-a is the cheap alternative. Therefore I have the experience to compare both therapy-methods with each other and believe it or not, but I have found out, that this short intake of high dosages of vitamin-a will help in such a short period of time. Don't know why, but that's the way it is. Just a few days an my skin clears up.

my skin was completely dry within 3 days of taking 25,000 iu of vitamin a

That's what I noticed, too.

I've been taking beta carotene for months and I was somewhat breakout free for a little, but once i stopped taking it, I immediately got 3 whiteheads. This is probably coincidence, since the time I started taking it is the same time I only got 2 hours of sleep a night for finals.

Just taking beta-carotene doesn't work for me. I think it's because one can't overdose. And such an overdose is needed to fight the oily skin. The body would't convert more beta-carotene to Vitamin-a than he needs.

Sorry if I've left some mistakes in writing, my english isn't the best ;)

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"The thing is, if you are going this route, then just do Accutane -- it's far more effective and, believe it or not, much safer than what you are doing."

Actually it is almost the same thing. Overdosing on vitamin A is the same as taking isotretinoin (roaccutane). That's the idea. Isotretinoin is a derivative of vitamin A, but is more selective to your retinoic skin receptors. Have a guess at one of the many side effects of vitamin A overdose? Shrinkage of your pores, including less subum production. So you may as well be taking roaccutane. Because it's cheaper, not safer.

Also you're looking at this on a day-by-day basis. That won't work. It takes weeks to have any effect at all. And I have read people trying to use vitamin A instead of roaccutane, but they mainly used 50,000 IU's a day. The other side effects will be soore eyes, headache, dry skin/lips/eyes, frail bones and the list goes on...

I was on roaccutane for about two jears 2001 and 2002 with a short break between. And I can say, that the side effects are nearly the same, so I dont care about that point. Now in 2006 I have chosen vitamin-a for therapy because of the high price of roaccutane in germany. And my health insurance won't pay again for this medication the thirt time. Vitamin-a is the cheap alternative. Therefore I have the experience to compare both therapy-methods with each other and believe it or not, but I have found out, that this short intake of high dosages of vitamin-a will help in such a short period of time. Don't know why, but that's the way it is. Just a few days an my skin clears up.

my skin was completely dry within 3 days of taking 25,000 iu of vitamin a

That's what I noticed, too.

I've been taking beta carotene for months and I was somewhat breakout free for a little, but once i stopped taking it, I immediately got 3 whiteheads. This is probably coincidence, since the time I started taking it is the same time I only got 2 hours of sleep a night for finals.

Just taking beta-carotene doesn't work for me. I think it's because one can't overdose. And such an overdose is needed to fight the oily skin. The body would't convert more beta-carotene to Vitamin-a than he needs.

Sorry if I've left some mistakes in writing, my english isn't the best ;)

your body will store beta carotene, and convert it to vitamin A when it needs to

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I would like to give this a shot. Does anyone know any conversion rates for your body, like x amount of vitamin a is converted to x amount of isotretinoin?

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I would like to give this a shot. Does anyone know any conversion rates for your body, like x amount of vitamin a is converted to x amount of isotretinoin?

I would be curious as to this myself. I have been on the 'tane about three times now, so my cystic acne is controlled. However, my oily skin drives me insane and b5 isn't working as well as I had hoped.

I have been taking 100,000 (25,000 x 4 times a day) for the past few days. My skin is starting to dry up, however, I have also gotten a (small) flare up. Can't tell if it's from the drugs or stress :)

I know this is dangerous, blah blah....I am in relatively good health and (obviously) once I started feeling weird, I would stop ASAP :)

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"The thing is, if you are going this route, then just do Accutane -- it's far more effective and, believe it or not, much safer than what you are doing."

Actually it is almost the same thing. Overdosing on vitamin A is the same as taking isotretinoin (roaccutane). That's the idea. Isotretinoin is a derivative of vitamin A, but is more selective to your retinoic skin receptors. Have a guess at one of the many side effects of vitamin A overdose? Shrinkage of your pores, including less subum production. So you may as well be taking roaccutane. Because it's cheaper, not safer.

Also you're looking at this on a day-by-day basis. That won't work. It takes weeks to have any effect at all. And I have read people trying to use vitamin A instead of roaccutane, but they mainly used 50,000 IU's a day. The other side effects will be soore eyes, headache, dry skin/lips/eyes, frail bones and the list goes on...

Then go ask your doctor just how safe overdosing on toxic levels of vitamin A really is. I think you need to do a bit more research. While accutane is a derivitive of vitamin A, it is not exactly the same. Yes, you can get the same results from overdosing on vitamin A but the resulting damage is going to be far worse than typical side effects of accutane. And I honestly cannot see how people believe that overdosing on anything is going to do anything exept create more problems. "I cured my acne temporarily but now I'm dying from liver failure and need a transplant." Brilliant.

If he wants to damage his liver like the guy who wants to drink alcohol while on Accutane (God forbid he actually wait a few months to get wasted), then be my guest. I choose not to not purposely destroy the only liver I have. You guys can do whatever the hell you want. It's completely insane, but whatever.

"Overdosing on Vitamins and Minerals

by Anna Whitson Herforth

Featured in the Tufts Daily November 2003

Overdosing on Vitamins and Minerals

Setting the Record Straight on Nutrition Misinformation

Veggies, fruit, and sex?

Would you like fries with that salad?

People tend to think that with anything good, the more the better—and vitamins and minerals are no exception to this myth.

Vitamins and minerals get a lot of press for all their benefits, and rightly so—they are critical for health and optimal physical and mental performance. Busy and conscientious students, taking note of ubiquitous advertising by the fortified food and supplement industries, might be persuaded to eat a fortified cereal at breakfast, grab an energy bar for lunch, drink one or two vitamin-enhanced sports drinks, and take a few vitamins just in case they are not managing to meet their nutrient requirements. They might think that the extra supplements insure that their nutrient needs are being met—at least vitamins can’t hurt, right?

With nutrients, like everything else, however, there can be too much of a good thing. Too many supplements, combined with fortified foods and other whole foods in the diet, actually may cause harm, health and nutrition experts now agree.

When vitamins and minerals are taken in excess they can cause toxicity problems, or affect the body’s ability to absorb or retain other nutrients. The chart summarizes some of the potential negative effects of overdosing on select vitamins and minerals. The chart also includes the Tolerable Upper Intake Levels (UL), which define the highest amount of a nutrient that is likely not to cause harm for most healthy people when consumed daily. (Recommended Dietary Allowances—RDAs—are provided for comparison.)

If the term “Upper Level� sounds unfamiliar, that is because it is a fairly recent addition to the nutrient recommendations put out by the National Academy of Sciences Committee on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs), and because ULs do not appear on food or supplement labels.

Nutrition experts view ULs as important in addressing the risk of excessive nutrient intakes. Dr. Jeanne Goldberg, professor at Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, was a member of the “Committee for Use of DRIs in Labeling� this year. She said, “It’s useful to the public to know that there are upper levels for some nutrients, and which nutrients those are. The concept of an upper level underscores that there are things other than calories for which more isn’t better.�

Dr. Irwin Rosenberg, Dean of Tufts Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy, chaired the same Committee. He cautioned that the reason Upper Levels are not established for all of the vitamins and minerals is lack of data, not because those nutrients are safe at every level of intake. “There needs to be a lot more research on safety,� he said. “Unfortunately, it’s not easy to do this kind of research ethically, since we know there may be risks associated with vitamin intakes that are too high.�

Many people take supplements just in case their diet does not meet their nutrient needs. But Dr. Rosenberg said he is not a proponent of taking “insurance vitamins;� that it’s not a scientific concept. “There is no evidence that getting more than the RDA of a vitamin or mineral will yield any benefit for the average person. If you choose to take a supplement, you ought to at least consider whether it might be pushing you to the upper level, and do a personal risk-benefit analysis.�

See the sidebar for the experts’ tips on assessing intake and preventing vitamin and mineral overdose.

Rosenberg and Goldberg support the view that it is best to eat a balanced diet instead of depending on supplements. “It’s not a workable quick fix to live on diet Coke, cucumbers, and One-A-Days,� said Dr. Goldberg. Foods provide important components of a good diet that do not come in a pill, like fiber and phytochemicals. In any case, most people normally get all the nutrients they need just from eating a balanced diet. Dr. Goldberg said, “If you’re trying to make up for a diet that’s lacking, taking vitamins and minerals probably won’t help. Supplements are in no way a substitute for a good diet. And if you’re eating reasonably well, your diet is probably better than you think.� To follow the experts’ advice, one must consider whether there really is a need for taking supplements—and a good diet begins with food.

Nutritionists’ tips to prevent overdosing on vitamins and minerals:

Be sure to know how much of a certain nutrient is in any supplement you take, and what the ULs are for that nutrient. Some supplements approach or exceed the Upper Level, the maximum quantity that is likely to not cause harm when taken daily. Complete tables for the current ULs of vitamins and minerals can be found at the Council for Responsible Nutrition’s website.

Get a sense of whether you really need a supplement by doing a personal diet assessment at the USDA Food and Nutrition Information Center website.

If you’re not sure how much nutrients you’re getting, the experts agree that it is safest to eat a balanced diet instead of depending on supplements."

Or try this link:

http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/...in_toxicity.jsp

"Vitamin Therapy for Acne:

Nutritionists generally suggest:

30 - 50 mg Zinc supplement daily - Zinc may help contribute to reducing the inflammation and heals the damaged skin.

Chromium supplements - Chromium helps boosts the body's ability to break down glucose.

Vitamin A - reduces sebum and keratin production. (Caution: taking mega doses of Vitamin A can cause headaches, fatigue, muscle and joint pain and other side effects. Consult a qualified practitioner before taking mega supplements) Vitamin E - an antioxidant (200 to 400 IU a day)

Vitamin B-6 50 mg per day. This vitamin aids in the metabolism of hormones"

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And another:

"Vitamin A Drug and Food Interactions

Vitamin A absorption may be reduced by the following drugs, health conditions and foods:

Cholestyramine

Colestipol

Mineral Oil

Orlistat

Intestinal Malabsorption Syndromes

Liver, Gallbladder and Pancreatic Conditions

Weight Loss Surgery

Olestra (the fat substitute) inhibits the absorption of all fat soluble vitamins including A,D,E,K,F

Vitamin A and retinoid drugs may act synergistically in several ways including increasing the toxicity of each. Retinoid Drugs include acitretin, all-trans-retinoic acid, bexarotene, etretinate and isotretinoin. Oral contraceptives may also increase serum retinol.

Large doses of vitamin A may decrease the absorption of vitamin K. Vitamin A and Vitamin D may act synnergistically to cause excess calcium absorption and deposition in tissues. This would only be an issue when one or both vitamins are taken in excess. Young and developing childen are the most vulnerable to this type of toxicity.

Vitamin A Toxicity and Overdosage

Acute toxicity in infants or children may occur with a single dose of 25,000 IU per kilogram of body weight (the conversion is 2.2 pounds per kilogram). For example, a child weighing 22 pounds (10 Kg.) would have to take a single dose of 250,000 units to manifest an acute toxic reaction. A dose of 2,000,000 IU or greater in adults may cause acute toxic symptoms. Most of the reported cases of vitamin A toxicity and overdosage has been from arctic explorers who consumed livers of polar animals, polar bears and seals in particular. There have been very few reports of fatalities from high doses of vitamin A.

Supplemental doses of 10,000 IU of vitamin A daily or greater have been reported to increase the risk of birth defects when used by pregnant women.

Subjects in the EUROSCAN study were given 300,000 IU/day of vitamin A for one year followed by 150,000 IU/day for the second year. Typical side effects were mucocutaneous ones including dryness, desquamation, itching, bleeding and hair loss. Hepatotoxicity has been reported in one patient who took 25,000 IU/day of vitamin A over a six-year period.

Symptoms of Vitamin A Toxicity

Signs and Symptoms of Vitamin A Toxicity include:

Blurred vision

Bone pain

Diarrhea

Dryness of the skin and mucous membranes

Fatigue

Headache

Liver damage and liver enlargement

Loss of hair

Nausea

Skin rashes

Small cracks and scales on the lips and at the corners of the mouth

Vomiting

Irritability

Pseudotumor cerebri (benign intracranial hypertension)

Elevated serum liver enzymes

Reversible noncirrhotic portal hypertension

Hepatic fibrosis and cirrhosis

Treatment for Vitamin A Toxicity

The treatment for vitamin A toxicity is to discontinue taking any vitamin A supplements and avoid foods rich in vitamin A. As the stored vitamin A is used by the body, the symptoms should diminish. If you suspect that you may be experiencing vitamin A toxicity, see your phsician. Your physician will be able to perform tests to properly diagnose your condition and recommend proper treatment if needed.

Vitamin A Dosage

By law, the use of vitamin A or any retinoid for the treatment of any medical condition must be prescribed and supervised by a physician.

Vitamin supplements may contain one or more of retinyl acetate and retinyl palmitate and beta carotene. Rarely are doses higher than 5,000 IU of vitamin A exceeded in these formulas. The beta carotene content does not count toward the vitamin A dosage from a toxicological standpoint. Many take beta-carotene for vitamin A supplements for this reason. Vitamin A is also available in the form of cod liver oil.

The current recommended dietary allowances (RDA) for vitamin A by the Food and Nutrition Board of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences are:

Infants up to 1 year old - 1,250 IU per day

Children 1 through 3 years old - 1,333 IU per day

Children 4 through 6 years old - 1,667 IU per day

Children 7 through 10 years old - 2,333 IU per day

Males 11 years and older - 3,333 IU per day

Females 11 years and older - 3,333 IU per day

Pregnant/Lactating 1st 6 months - 4,333 IU per day

Pregnant/Lactating 2nd 6 months - 4,000 IU per day

One IU or one USP unit equals 0.30 micrograms of all-trans retinol, 0.344 micrograms of retinyl acetate or 0.55 micrograms of retinyl palmitate.

Remember that the RDA is the dose that is believed to prevent the symptoms of deficiency disease. The dosage that provides optimum health and disease resistance is likely higher than the RDA. Unfortunately, there is no research data showing what optimum levels are. The optimum level for different individuals is likely to vary because of different genetics and metabolic needs. The fact that vitamin A can be toxic means that one must be cautious about overdosing.

"

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please please please stop overdosing on medication or vitamins of anykind unless you have chemistry knowledge of the university level or biology knowledge of the university level or unless your a bloody doctor, because you may mess up the rest of your body and not cure your acne as a worse case scenario, use common sense please.

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please please please stop overdosing on medication or vitamins of anykind unless you have chemistry knowledge of the university level or biology knowledge of the university level or unless your a bloody doctor, because you may mess up the rest of your body and not cure your acne as a worse case scenario, use common sense please.

Most studies I have looked at state that doses GREATER than 100,000 over months can have a toxic effect. I wasn't planning on taking more or for a long period of time.

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mskitty how is your skin doing? Maybe the breakout you are talking about is just getting the acne out that is already under your skin like an IB from accutane.

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mskitty how is your skin doing? Maybe the breakout you are talking about is just getting the acne out that is already under your skin like an IB from accutane.

My skin broke out REALLY bad yesterday. I have a huge cyst on my cheek and I haven't broken out like that in a long ass time.

My skin is still oily as shit. The oil bothers me more than the acne I think...I will keep you posted!

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IVE READ MANYT HINGS ABOUT PPL OVERDOSING ON VIT A in these forums and i tried to explain to thme what Susan1967 posted but noen of them will listen. I take Vit A 8,000IU not even everyday tis like a couple times a week and thats fine .. ppl think 25,000IU as day is alriught when really u should only b having 4 - 10,000 IU a day.

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Alright, still taking vitamin A although I dropped down to 50,000 IU because my face is breaking out so bad. It has got to be because of the vitamin a!

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Guest Dampfhammer

My skin looks better and better day by day, so I'm going to reduce the vitamin a intake to a level of 10.000 i. u. for the next time. Overdosing is working quite well that way, and I will do it again if my skin is getting worse. My dosage was to low to be toxic and my body will tell me, if i should definetely stop it.

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