Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

Hello All,

Is this considered a reputable brand of fish oil? It is from the Health From the Sun company. Here's the description and picture of the product: [description] [product]. The pros of the HFTS brand is that it is preserved with ascorbyl palmitate, a fat-soluble, but synthetic, form of Vitamin C as well as mixed tocopherols and rosemary extract (whatever that does). It is also two dollars cheaper, and two dollars is bus/laundry/sweet-sweet-bribery money.

I currently take Carlson's Fish Oil, which is promoted and advertised by Dr. Mercola on mercola.com. The qualms I have with Carlson's Fish Oil is that it is a) not refrigerated before opening (ie found in the store aisles, not in the refrigerator) and b) it is perserved from oxidation with only alpha-tocopherol, which is a "less expensive but less potent form" of the anti-oxidant Vitamin E. (I found this, actually, on Dr. Mercola's website: [fish oil oxidation].

The plus point of Carlson's brand of fish oil is basically Dr. Mercola's advocacy. He says that it has been rigorously tested for mercury, PCBs and other toxic chemicals, but you know what? I kind of think Dr. Mercola is a little bit crazy. Perhaps not wrong, but a little off his rocker. And I don't trust him. And I think it's strange that Carlson's fish oil is not refrigerated when most oils, like flax oil by Health From the Sun or Barlean's or Udo's is refigerated, and the fish oil from HFTS is refrigerated too.

So yes, any fish oil/fat oxidation experts out there? I would love to hear your opinion.

Muchas Gracias,

igmp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll give a tentative "thumbs-up" to the Health From the Sun product, although I'll add a few comments of my own. Note the amusing statement they make about it: "Natural antioxidant blend ensures 13 month shelf-life at room temperature prior to opening". Since it comes nitrogen-flushed, I'm less concerned with shelf-storage PRIOR to opening it for the first time than I am what happens AFTER you open it when you take it home from the health-food store. I do appreciate the fact that they include tocopherols and ascorbyl palmitate, but I still recommend adding a small amount of BHT to the bottle after opening it, and keeping it in the refrigerator. Oils like that will thicken considerably at refrigerator temperatures, but it's certainly still usable.

I personally would be slightly concerned about using the Carlson's brand, because it only comes in capsules (if I'm reading the ad correctly), and only has vitamin E as an antioxidant. I much prefer liquid oil in a bottle (because I can add extra antioxidants to it myself) that comes nitrogen-flushed.

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Isn't the bottle of Carlson's fish/cod liver oil nitrogen-flushed? That's what it says on my bottle of it... So wouldn't it not matter that it's not refrigerated before opening?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Bryan,

The Carlson's Fish Oil that I take is in (disgusting, lemony) liquid form. About BHT, from what I read, there seems to be alot of controversy about this preservative. It is suspected that for *some* people it is difficult to digest. How would one be able to gauge their individual reaction to this chemical?

Leah,

Yes, Carlson's does come nitrogen-flushed. I did not know that this process stabilized it for the shelf. Can you tell me what nitrogen-flushing does?

Thank you both!

igmp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Leah,

Yes, Carlson's does come nitrogen-flushed. I did not know that this process stabilized it for the shelf. Can you tell me what nitrogen-flushing does?

Well, I'm not that knowledgeable on the subject, but put simply, I guess it prevents the oil form being oxidized (until you open it) because the oxygen is replaced with nitrogen.

So the only concern with Carlson's fish oil is that perhaps there aren't enough antioxidants added to it to preserve it after opening.

I'm a little wary of BHT, too...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

About BHT, from what I read, there seems to be alot of controversy about this preservative. It is suspected that for *some* people it is difficult to digest. How would one be able to gauge their individual reaction to this chemical?

It's not a matter of being "difficult to digest", it's just a matter of old-fashioned allegations that it might be toxic. However, you should know that some life-extender types actually take SUPPLEMENTS of the stuff, like you would a vitamin, in amounts that are VASTLY beyond the levels you would get from fish oil that had BHT added to it at the usual preservative levels.

Yes, Carlson's does come nitrogen-flushed. I did not know that this process stabilized it for the shelf. Can you tell me what nitrogen-flushing does?

What Leah said is correct: nitrogen is chemically inert, and displaces the chemically active oxygen, preventing oxidation of any other sensitive chemicals that are in the bottle.

If Carlson's does come nitrogen-flushed, then I feel better about it.

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Bryan,

Yes, I've read that life-extenders take BHT as a supplement, but I don't find that fully convincing because alot of people take alot of supplements and that doesn't necessarily mean that it is safe or healthy....

But thank you and Leah for filling me in on the purpose of nitrogen flushing. Appreciate the info.

:D

igmp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Bryan,

Yes, I've read that life-extenders take BHT as a supplement, but I don't find that fully convincing because alot of people take alot of supplements and that doesn't necessarily mean that it is safe or healthy....

I just want to be sure that you understand the point I'm making, which is the following: back in the 60's and 70's, there was a ground swell of people (maybe from the New Age and hippy movements? :) ) objecting to the use of preservatives in the food supply; it was responsible for a decline in the use of antioxidants like BHT and BHA, despite the fact that consuming oxidized fats is VERY DANGEROUS. The claim was that such antioxidants weren't "natural", and could be toxic themselves. But at the very peak of use of BHT before the public uproar began, the amount that was being consumed in the typical American diet was only around a couple of milligrams or so. Now compare that to the amount of BHT which is taken by some life-extenders, which is sometimes as much as a couple of GRAMS. Yes, that's a THOUSAND TIMES as much as what the typical American was getting in his diet when BHT usage was at its peak! ;) I think the point of that is obvious.

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Bryan,

Thank you for your explanation, but I still don't understand how that's sound justification for taking a large amount of a preservative. Just because an unknown amount of people take an unknown-but-presumably-large amount of supplements doesn't mean it is safe, does it? I don't know anything about the health of these life-extenders; has it been documented anywhere? They might have dropped dead, for all I know.

In regards to BHT specifically, I doubt that a few mgs will elicit an allergic reaction or whatever from me. Do you have any articles that attest to its safety? It is a controversial preservative; the article on wikipedia stated that Japan, Romania, Sweden and Australia have banned it [here]. It seems that the U.S. food industry is generally ok with its usage, but the less mainstream proponents of health and diet are skeptical about it (like they always are). I'll do a pubmed search and see what I find.

igmp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello Bryan,

Thank you for your explanation, but I still don't understand how that's sound justification for taking a large amount of a preservative.

???

It's NOT really a sound justification for that. I never said it was.

I don't want you to take "large amounts" of BHT, I want you to use it in the APPROVED fashion, like as as excellent antioxidant for fish/cod oils, and at the recommended dose. Products like fish oils need all the antioxidant help they can get, and BHT is great for that purpose.

Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×