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Guest Cubsfan

brief summary of what I believe is the cause of acne.

refined carbohydrates enters the body, the blood sugar level rises, the brain tells the pancreas to produce insulin (hormone) to regulate the blood sugar, now if your body is loaded with saturated fats this can block up the arteries preventing the insulin from doing its job (insulin's job is to travel from the pancreas to cells all over the body, unlocking the cells so glucose can enter the cells and use it for energy) - the brain then tells the pancreas to produce more insulin, because it thinks the pancreas is bludging - the hormonal imbalance caused by excess insulin somehow aggravates the sebaceous glands to secrete oil, and the toxins from the food gets released out of the skin, the combination of oil and toxins inflames the skin and acne develops, so people who eat a lot of foods high in refined carbs, artificial stuff and saturated fats, and are inactive are more prone to acne, more likely to become insulin resistant and developing type 2 diabetes

so if you don't want the to go the common sense approach of a high fiber - low fat - low refined carb whole foods diet & exercise - you can take fiber supplements - fiber helps to absorb the saturated fats paving a way for the insulin to do its job.

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brief summary of what I believe is the cause of acne.

refined carbohydrates enters the body, the blood sugar level rises, the brain tells the pancreas to produce insulin (hormone) to regulate the blood sugar, now if your body is loaded with saturated fats this can block up the arteries preventing the insulin from doing its job (insulin's job is to travel from the pancreas to cells all over the body, unlocking the cells so glucose can enter the cells and use it for energy) - the brain tells the pancreas to produce more insulin, because it thinks the pancreas is bludging - the hormonal imbalance caused by excess insulin somehow aggravates the sebaceous glands to secrete oil, and the toxins from the food gets released out of the skin, the combination of oil and toxins inflames the skin where acne develops, so people who eat a lot of foods high in refined carbs, artificial stuff and saturated fats, and are inactive are more prone to acne and becoming insulin resistant and developing type 2 diabetes

so if you don't want the to go the common sense approach of a high fiber - low fat - low refined carb whole foods diet & exercise - you can take fiber supplements - fiber helps to absorb the saturated fats paving a way for the insulin to do its job.

Good info. Hopefully this is right. I've read the same thing somewhere about the sebum and toxins. NO ITS NOT SEBUM AND DIRT. obviously we have dirt all over our face... so I dont think not washing face enough is the case.

I just dont know, do some people who eat extra healthy and work out still get breakouts.. so maybe they need a liver flush... :think:

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brief summary of what I believe is the cause of acne.

refined carbohydrates enters the body, the blood sugar level rises, the brain tells the pancreas to produce insulin (hormone) to regulate the blood sugar, now if your body is loaded with saturated fats this can block up the arteries preventing the insulin from doing its job (insulin's job is to travel from the pancreas to cells all over the body, unlocking the cells so glucose can enter the cells and use it for energy) - the brain then tells the pancreas to produce more insulin, because it thinks the pancreas is bludging - the hormonal imbalance caused by excess insulin somehow aggravates the sebaceous glands to secrete oil, and the toxins from the food gets released out of the skin, the combination of oil and toxins inflames the skin and acne develops, so people who eat a lot of foods high in refined carbs, artificial stuff and saturated fats, and are inactive are more prone to acne, more likely to become insulin resistant and developing type 2 diabetes

so if you don't want the to go the common sense approach of a high fiber - low fat - low refined carb whole foods diet & exercise - you can take fiber supplements - fiber helps to absorb the saturated fats paving a way for the insulin to do its job.

I agree with a lot of what you said. I don't think refined carbs are good to eat much of the time. Centered around activity they are ok, i.e. workouts. Refined sugars are poor. High carb diets are also poor in my opinion. Best carbs on earth are fruits and vegs.

This is not meant to discourage anyone but I do believe that diet does have a maximum effectiveness. In other words, I believe diet can only do so much.

I think it could improve your skin 70-90%. I think it really is about having a healthy system or not.

If a person has a healthy system they can eat anything and not break out. If a person has a system which has problems with functioning in the environment it is in, THEN it will produce breakouts.

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Soluble fiber is what affects the rate at which food turns into glucose.

Yes. But poorer carbohydrates are more difficult for the system. I.e. white flours, sugar from soda, etc are much different on how the liver processes than carbohydrates from veggies and whole wheat flour.

I realize that the white flour/soda lack fiber but it is more too it than that.

I mean, it is really a silly argument that people continue to bring up that carbohydrates are the same no matter what their source is, the determining factor is only fiber. I don't think that is a strong argument.

If that were the case then people could just drink soda with psyllium husks and be healthy. A nice mix of carbohydrates and fibers.

Nutrition science isn't perfect yet. There are a lot of things they think they know but really the healing power of goods foods isn't completely understood yet.

SO NO, NOT ALL CARBS ARE EQUAL. I don't care what studies people post about how the liver processes carbs at the same rate, blah blah blah.

Studies aren't always good. Some are hogwash even if done by doctors.

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brief summary of what I believe is the cause of acne.

...refined carbohydrates enters the body, the blood sugar level rises

...people who eat a lot of foods high in refined carbs

...so if you don't want the to go the common sense approach of a high fiber - low fat - low refined carb

Hmmm...I see the usual effort to blame all blood-sugar problems on REFINED carbs. While I agree that unrefined carbs are probably more likely on average to have soluble fiber associated with them (which slows down the absorption of carbs in general), I still think it's a little misleading and ultimately inadvisable to be harping on refined versus unrefined all the time, as if that's the sole determinant of what's healthy to eat. Even an unrefined carb will have a high glycemic index, unless there's something else in it (or accompanying it in the rest of the meal) to slow its absorption, like fat, protein, or soluble fiber.

Bryan

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Soluble fiber is what affects the rate at which food turns into glucose.

Yes. But poorer carbohydrates are more difficult for the system. I.e. white flours, sugar from soda, etc are much different on how the liver processes than carbohydrates from veggies and whole wheat flour.

I'm not entirely sure what you mean by "more difficult" for the system. Let's put it a little more precisely: veggies and whole wheat flour are obviously HEALTHIER and MORE NUTRITIOUS than white flour and soda pop. But I don't believe that was really the issue here. What we were talking about is the ability of those foods to raise blood sugar. And what blackbirdbeatle said was correct.

I realize that the white flour/soda lack fiber but it is more too it than that.

I mean, it is really a silly argument that people continue to bring up that carbohydrates are the same no matter what their source is, the determining factor is only fiber. I don't think that is a strong argument.

If that were the case then people could just drink soda with psyllium husks and be healthy. A nice mix of carbohydrates and fibers.

Again, we were discussing the specific issue of the ability of those foods to raise blood sugar. Nothing else. Nobody is claiming that soda and psyllium husks would make a nutritious diet! :hand:

SO NO, NOT ALL CARBS ARE EQUAL. I don't care what studies people post about how the liver processes carbs at the same rate, blah blah blah.

Carbs ARE all equal, as far as their innate ability to raise blood sugar is concerned. Only accompanying factors (fat, protein, soluble fiber) make them behave differently.

Bryan

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I'm confused :think:

If we ignore the whole "refined" vs. "unrefined" lingo, we are still left with other categories to define a carbohydrate. When we take these into consideration, carbohydrates are not ALL equal.

Carbohydrates are:

Fiber

Starch

Sugar

(Glycoproteins)

(Glycolipids)

Within the above categories, they can be further classifierd into:

different starches

different fibers

different sugars

(different glycoproteins (i.e. gluten, whey, k-casein))

that all have a different metabolic rate or metabolic process within the human body. Of particular interest is that Starches, Sugars, and Glycoproteins have the ability to increase our insulin (and/or inflammation) levels, depending on what typeof sugar, starch or glycoprotein (some are allergenic/antigenic) they may be.

Obviously with a few exceptions we don't eat just carbohydrates, but also the proteins, fat, enzymes, antinutients, and nutrients that these Plant-based Foods contain. Since all these other factors, not counting people's hypersenstivities, help determine the way a particular nutrient or building block will affect our insulin levels, I don't think that adding fiber alone is the ultimate solution.

Although I'm curious to see someone who KNOWS corn syrup breaks them out, down Soda (that was sweetned with high fructose corn syrup or fructose) mixed with 5g or 10 g of Soluble fiber and report back their results. Some members can beat the sugar-induced acne with exercise, anyone care to see if they can beat it with only soluble fiber?

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I'm confused :think:

If we ignore the whole "refined" vs. "unrefined" lingo, we are still left with other categories to define a carbohydrate. When we take these into consideration, carbohydrates are not ALL equal.

Carbohydrates are:

Fiber

Starch

Sugar

(Glycoproteins)

(Glycolipids)

Within the above categories, they can be further classifierd into:

different starches

different fibers

different sugars

(different glycoproteins (i.e. gluten, whey, k-casein))

that all have a different metabolic rate or metabolic process within the human body.

Yes, SweetJade, all that's correct, of course, but we here in the Diet Forum are only speaking rather loosely about all this stuff. The main issue that's been going around and around here for some time is the old chestnut about how "complex" carbs are supposedly broken-down and absorbed far more slowly than simple sugars, so those "complex" carbs continue to be recommended over the sugars by some people for anyone who wants to control his blood sugar and insulin. We all know that fibers aren't digested at all, so we've sort of treated them as a separate class when discussing this issue of carbs and blood sugar.

So I stand by what I've been saying all along: the "complexity" per se of the carb has little to do with how fast it raises blood sugar (and consequently, insulin). The major factors which DO affect that are the simultaneous presence (or absence) of certain other food factors like soluble fiber, fat, and protein.

Of particular interest is that Starches, Sugars, and Glycoproteins have the ability to increase our insulin (and/or inflammation) levels, depending on what typeof sugar, starch or glycoprotein (some are allergenic/antigenic) they may be.

Maybe so, but let's treat that as a separate issue.

Obviously with a few exceptions we don't eat just carbohydrates, but also the proteins, fat, enzymes, antinutients, and nutrients that these Plant-based Foods contain.

Sure. I just want people to get off this old-fashioned notion that the "complexity" of the carb has anything to do with it.

Since all these other factors, not counting people's hypersenstivities, help determine the way a particular nutrient or building block will affect our insulin levels, I don't think that adding fiber alone is the ultimate solution.

Ok, now it's MY turn to be confused! :) Are you saying that you doubt that soluble fiber alone can have much of an effect at slowing down the absorption of carbs eaten along with it, or are you saying something else?

Although I'm curious to see someone who KNOWS corn syrup breaks them out, down Soda (that was sweetned with high fructose corn syrup or fructose) mixed with 5g or 10 g of Soluble fiber and report back their results. Some members can beat the sugar-induced acne with exercise, anyone care to see if they can beat it with only soluble fiber?

I have pretty much the same question here: are you doubting that soluble fiber would really reduce the blood sugar/insulin spike, and you're proposing the experiment above as a test of that theory? Or are you suggesting that people get acne from corn syrup (allegedly) for some reason OTHER than a spike in blood sugar/insulin?

Bryan

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I'm confused :think:

If we ignore the whole "refined" vs. "unrefined" lingo, we are still left with other categories to define a carbohydrate. When we take these into consideration, carbohydrates are not ALL equal.

Carbohydrates are:

Fiber

Starch

Sugar

(Glycoproteins)

(Glycolipids)

Within the above categories, they can be further classifierd into:

different starches

different fibers

different sugars

(different glycoproteins (i.e. gluten, whey, k-casein))

that all have a different metabolic rate or metabolic process within the human body.

Yes, SweetJade, all that's correct, of course, but we here in the Diet Forum are only speaking rather loosely about all this stuff. The main issue that's been going around and around here for some time is the old chestnut about how "complex" carbs are supposedly broken-down and absorbed far more slowly than simple sugars, so those "complex" carbs continue to be recommended over the sugars by some people for anyone who wants to control his blood sugar and insulin. We all know that fibers aren't digested at all, so we've sort of treated them as a separate class when discussing this issue of carbs and blood sugar.

So I stand by what I've been saying all along: the "complexity" per se of the carb has little to do with how fast it raises blood sugar (and consequently, insulin). The major factors which DO affect that are the simultaneous presence (or absence) of certain other food factors like soluble fiber, fat, and protein.

Of particular interest is that Starches, Sugars, and Glycoproteins have the ability to increase our insulin (and/or inflammation) levels, depending on what typeof sugar, starch or glycoprotein (some are allergenic/antigenic) they may be.

Maybe so, but let's treat that as a separate issue.

Obviously with a few exceptions we don't eat just carbohydrates, but also the proteins, fat, enzymes, antinutients, and nutrients that these Plant-based Foods contain.

Sure. I just want people to get off this old-fashioned notion that the "complexity" of the carb has anything to do with it.

Since all these other factors, not counting people's hypersenstivities, help determine the way a particular nutrient or building block will affect our insulin levels, I don't think that adding fiber alone is the ultimate solution.

Ok, now it's MY turn to be confused! :) Are you saying that you doubt that soluble fiber alone can have much of an effect at slowing down the absorption of carbs eaten along with it, or are you saying something else?

Although I'm curious to see someone who KNOWS corn syrup breaks them out, down Soda (that was sweetned with high fructose corn syrup or fructose) mixed with 5g or 10 g of Soluble fiber and report back their results. Some members can beat the sugar-induced acne with exercise, anyone care to see if they can beat it with only soluble fiber?

I have pretty much the same question here: are you doubting that soluble fiber would really reduce the blood sugar/insulin spike, and you're proposing the experiment above as a test of that theory? Or are you suggesting that people get acne from corn syrup (allegedly) for some reason OTHER than a spike in blood sugar/insulin?

Bryan

LOL, I'll leave you to dealing with "complexity" and as for the soluble fiber, I didn't mention as being a negative factor of a carbohydrate. Sugars, Starches and Glycoproteins can be negative factors when we are looking at certain ones, especially regarding the development of acne for those of us that are susceptible to dietary influences.

Furthermore, there are studies that suggest that it may have to do with nutrients found in whole grain breads as to why they are helpful at reducing insulin spikes or improving insulin sensitivity, ex: Magnesium. So I for one no longer assume anything (at least I hope I'm not) ;-)

I have no doubt that corn syrup spikes insulin levels, but because it's not just glucose that we are dealing with, but also fructose corn syrup/hfcs are going to also indirectly spike our inflammatory products levels too. Since insulin and LDL cholesterol (a possible indirect route for corn syrup) are both capable of going down or opening the path leading to inflammatory events, soluble fiber seems like an ideal solution.

It makes sense that theoretically if you add enough soluble fiber (how much?) you could consume a yummy glass of soda pop. After all, fruits and vegatables have their sugars and I, sometimes we, don't break out from these plant foods, so why wouldnt' this work? Of course plants have other nutrients, enzymes, fats, and proteins, that may also be helping here (which brings us back to the previous paragraph).

Unfortunately, I've loosely observed and it doesn't seem to work for me, unless I'm not getting enough fiber (fruits don't have THAT much fiber). In fact 2 weeks ago I was doing one of my dinner assignemnets and we had "family meal" before the guests arrived and I had barbeque meat (mildly sweet, probably from corn syrup/HFCS), brocolli & cauliflower (some soluble fiber) that may have had butter (which is confounding variable since dairy breaks me out too) and a nice array of multicolored green salad (some soluble fiber).... I still broke out in cystic acne....sniff sniff

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Guest Cubsfan

when i mention refined carbs I'm referring to natural carbs in foods that have been processed and stripped of its nutrients like white flour, white bread, table sugar.

I've been doing an experiment where I'm eating kfc, pizza, ice cream etc and taking 1 tablespoon of metamucil fiber religously for twice a day - its been about a month now. Although I do get one or two pimples every 3 or so days, but I also take probiotics like yakult and garden of life fungal defense - so that may have made a contribution to the results. It'll probably work better if I gobbled a tonne of vegetables instead of the supplements though.

I'm gonna go back to my tried and proven formula soon

- natural whole foods diet

- exercise

- boo ya

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so have you been doing a certain food on a particular week or just mixing it all up. Like for me i ate pizza at work. and i got 2 breakouts. but i havent ate any milk products this week and no breakouts. It could just be the milk products?

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LOL, I'll leave you to dealing with "complexity" and as for the soluble fiber, I didn't mention as being a negative factor of a carbohydrate.

I don't understand what you mean.

Sugars, Starches and Glycoproteins can be negative factors when we are looking at certain ones, especially regarding the development of acne for those of us that are susceptible to dietary influences.

From that statement and the rest of your post, it does _appear_ to me that you're hinting that maybe blood sugar per se is not really the main factor in acne after all, but these (alleged) individual sensitivites to specific foods or food elements. Is that correct? ;)

Furthermore, there are studies that suggest that it may have to do with nutrients found in whole grain breads as to why they are helpful at reducing insulin spikes or improving insulin sensitivity, ex: Magnesium. So I for one no longer assume anything (at least I hope I'm not) ;-)

It would be easy enough to also add a good vitamin/mineral supplement to that soda pop/soluble fiber test that you proposed, if you really think that might be an important factor. Or perhaps just a soda pop/magnesium test, if you want to test that one specific factor. But doesn't it seem like such an alleged connection (acne/magnesium) would have been noticed long long ago?

I have no doubt that corn syrup spikes insulin levels, but because it's not just glucose that we are dealing with, but also fructose corn syrup/hfcs are going to also indirectly spike our inflammatory products levels too. Since insulin and LDL cholesterol (a possible indirect route for corn syrup) are both capable of going down or opening the path leading to inflammatory events, soluble fiber seems like an ideal solution.

It makes sense that theoretically if you add enough soluble fiber (how much?) you could consume a yummy glass of soda pop. After all, fruits and vegatables have their sugars and I, sometimes we, don't break out from these plant foods, so why wouldnt' this work? Of course plants have other nutrients, enzymes, fats, and proteins, that may also be helping here (which brings us back to the previous paragraph).

Again, it sounds like you might be slowly drifting away from the acne/blood sugar hypothseis. I never found that idea particularly persuasive, myself. I do find the other idea more appealing: the one that some considerably more SUBTLE diet/acne interaction is at work.

Bryan

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LOL, I'll leave you to dealing with "complexity" and as for the soluble fiber, I didn't mention as being a negative factor of a carbohydrate.

I don't understand what you mean.

Moi: As far as I know Fiber, soluble or insoluble, doesn't have any negative impacts on our skin, whereas the other types of carbohydrates can. Thus I didn't include it as a variable that one can change via reduction or elimination to improve skin

Sugars, Starches and Glycoproteins can be negative factors when we are looking at certain ones, especially regarding the development of acne for those of us that are susceptible to dietary influences.

From that statement and the rest of your post, it does _appear_ to me that you're hinting that maybe blood sugar per se is not really the main factor in acne after all, but these (alleged) individual sensitivites to specific foods or food elements. Is that correct? ;)

Moi: If you can come up with a better explanation as to why I can consume tons of white potato, corn, white rice and not have worries, I'm open. I will say in all fairness I have not tested consuming only 100% whole grain wheat (pasta would be the purest form) to see if I can consume this though. Yet I will say that there was a study done to compare semi-refined Rice vs. semi-refined Wheat and they postulated that it wasn't the glycoprotein Gluten (never mentioned), but perhaps the variance in Starch (amylose vs. amylopectin) as to why Wheat increased Insulin levels more, due to having less amylose starch content (slowly digested) than rice. Also, for various reasons perhaps, Low Carbers sometimes opt to go Gluten Free instead. Eat Right 4 Your Blood Type dieters find that when they also go Gluten Free (even if they aren't a Type B or Type O like my father and myself), their acne disappeared too!

Furthermore, from mine and others experiences I do believe that acne can obviously happen for different reasons. For me, it's definately not just the blood sugar issue or glucose intolerance issue, more specifically me being Insulin Resistant, but there's also other foods that I'm hypersensitive to that according to the GI, GL, II, have no major impact on Insulin levels. These would possibly fall under another theory (intestinal hyperpermeability AKA Leaky Gut Syndrome), but they have at least one thing in common with Insulin Resistance and that's how they can induce inflammation, which is what we recent studies suggest we need for the initial development of acne and possibly the development of Insulin Resistance (yet another new theory).

Furthermore, there are studies that suggest that it may have to do with nutrients found in whole grain breads as to why they are helpful at reducing insulin spikes or improving insulin sensitivity, ex: Magnesium. So I for one no longer assume anything (at least I hope I'm not) ;-)

It would be easy enough to also add a good vitamin/mineral supplement to that soda pop/soluble fiber test that you proposed, if you really think that might be an important factor. Or perhaps just a soda pop/magnesium test, if you want to test that one specific factor. But doesn't it seem like such an alleged connection (acne/magnesium) would have been noticed long long ago?

Moi: You have more resources available to you than I do, have you come across any magnesium studies involving acne? There are definately a few different types of vitamins and minerals linked to improving or worsening the skin of an acneic person, but I don't recall one of the being magnesium. However, once again...Insulin Resistance is taking a very loong time to get full recognition for being another "cause" for the development of acne, and Magnesuim is linked to improving Insulin Resistance, so I wouldn't expect to find a broad study on Magnesium & Acne until there's more acknowldgement for the Acne-IR connection. Granted, not all drugs, supplements, & diets that are found to improve IR, improve IR-linked acne, but a certain percentage of them do...perhaps magnesium is one of them

I have no doubt that corn syrup spikes insulin levels, but because it's not just glucose that we are dealing with, but also fructose corn syrup/hfcs are going to also indirectly spike our inflammatory products levels too. Since insulin and LDL cholesterol (a possible indirect route for corn syrup) are both capable of going down or opening the path leading to inflammatory events, soluble fiber seems like an ideal solution.

It makes sense that theoretically if you add enough soluble fiber (how much?) you could consume a yummy glass of soda pop. After all, fruits and vegatables have their sugars and I, sometimes we, don't break out from these plant foods, so why wouldnt' this work? Of course plants have other nutrients, enzymes, fats, and proteins, that may also be helping here (which brings us back to the previous paragraph).

Again, it sounds like you might be slowly drifting away from the acne/blood sugar hypothseis. I never found that idea particularly persuasive, myself. I do find the other idea more appealing: the one that some considerably more SUBTLE diet/acne interaction is at work.

Moi: LOL...hmm. Personal experience has shown me that my skin does not react the same way to Fructose as it does Glucose, and obviously it's due in part to the fact that these sugars are metabolized differently in the human body. My skin breaks out rather mildly (predominantly pustules) with the consumtion of Glucose based sugars, but give me Fructose based sugars (Honey, Corn Syrup, HFCS, 100% Fruit Juice) and my skin gets really ticked off (cystic/nodular acne)! So, once again, I know there's more to the development of acne regarding diet than just the glycemic index (measures glucose).

With the above in mind, I will say that I come here to help members if I can, but also to learn. When we first met it had to do with a discussion involving DHT antagonsts and how the great hope was to find a Type I 5-alpha reducatase inhibitor and all our acne woes would go away, right? You showed us a study that found that Type I inhibitors didn't affect the development of acne and/or sebum and as such, this particular theory was found to be unproven. OK, then we had a nice little discussion involving the androgen-diet role in acne development and again you pointed out a few things, that made me look a little further, hence my hypersenstivitiy theory. It's not that these things aren't strongly associated with a prevelance of acne, but it appears that sufferers, students, scientists, doctors are so used to the old theories regarding the development of acne, that when looking for a cause, the studies continue to focus on only these old theories instead of postulating NEW ones!

What's great about you is that you don't come on this board to ruin anybody's day, but to get us to THINK. You provide info, ask questions, and expect us to back up what we are saying, even if it's regarding another's theory. If we are unable to do so, then maybe just maybe what we thought, or have always heard was the cause of acne, may not be what's really going on after all. I truly believe that without being open-minded, highly observant and/or possessing some knowledge of how the human body works, you can't begin to form a hypothesis, let alone come up with a new theory, but surely if what has been found is not working for everyone, there mustbe another piece to this puzzle. That isn't to say that the current pieces don't fit together or the treatments aren't effective, but there are still people that these treatments aren't effective enough for or don't work at all, and that's where the double blinded, clinically controlled research appears to have become stagnant!

Up until a few years ago, there weren't even studies that specifically supported the diet-acne link, now we are getting a few more and usually in association with...Insulin Resistance. It's not that hormones aren't found to play a role, as Insulin Resistance can definately mess up your hormones, but hormonal imbalances, metabolic imbalances, hypersensitivities, (bacteria) etc appear to also be associated with our body's state of inflammation. Therefore when I looked at my pattern of acne development, as well as other rmembers, inflammation was something that could rise in that shorta time period, when androgens could not (but known science is always changing). This, the Silent or Long-term Background Inflammation theory is something that in the past 2 years has gained quite a bit of attention at being not a sign of a problem, but at possibly being the actual initiator of Insulin Resistance, Heart Disease and let's not forget...Acne! Of course, in time, there will be further puzzle pieces to find, perhaps one of these will point to how inflammation can even exist on such a (subclinical and) constant level to begin with...

Take Care

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Guest Cubsfan

hey terryh, how u've been? yeah I just mix up the junk food switching from kfc one day then burger king the next day etc. before i ate junk with no fibre supplements and I broke out like the plague

bryan so what do you believe is the cause/solution to acne? are you acne free?

sweetjade should be renamed to longjade because of the long posts

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hey terryh, how u've been? yeah I just mix up the junk food switching from kfc one day then burger king the next day etc. before i ate junk with no fibre supplements and I broke out like the plague

bryan so what do you believe is the cause/solution to acne? are you acne free?

sweetjade should be renamed to longjade because of the long posts

LOL, maybe if I had those long runners legs...oh well. :razz:

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So I stand by what I've been saying all along: the "complexity" per se of the carb has little to do with how fast it raises blood sugar (and consequently, insulin). The major factors which DO affect that are the simultaneous presence (or absence) of certain other food factors like soluble fiber, fat, and protein.

More than that though; physical factors of the food make a big difference, perhaps even the biggest.

Consider mashed potato. That has high GI. The mashed potato mixes with the digestive juices and the sugar is liberated very quickly.

But boiled potato, which has the same fiber, fat, protein is lower.

Presumably the food presents less surface area to the digestion system and takes longer to break down to simple sugars.

That's probably the biggest effect. Refined food has usually had the outside of the grain removed, so breaks down quickly, but unrefined food has the tough outer layers that are designed to protect the contents still in place; the digestion goes slower, and that gives lower GI.

White and brown bread for example is a honey comb of small air gaps that massively raise the surface area. Rye bread is much denser and much lower GI.

There's lots of other effects as well, but it's not all chemical; some of it is physical.

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So come on Bryan.

I read your supercilious replies all the time decrying others' efforts to sove their acne problem.

Why do you hang around on here?Just to mock the trials and tribululations of acne sufferers issues?

What's your take on how to rid the body of acne?

Cheaptricky

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