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Penguin Lancer

Question about my blood test for accutane

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Just got my inital blood test. Before I started accutane, my tryglicerides(sp) were at 488. How high do you think they may get while on accutane?

WOW!!! I'm surprised your derm is even letting you start Accutane. Lots of derms pull patients off around 400. After a month on Accutane, my tests came back at 298. End of 3rd month at 424, and at the end of the 4th month at 594. In my case, my triglycerides were continuously and steadily climbing upwards. I wouldn't be surprised if your next bloodtest shows triglycerides in the late 500's or 600's. More liberal derms (like mine) will allow higher triglyceride levels (400-600) but I'm surprised your derm is even allowing you begin treatment with such elevations already. There is a point your derm will take you off the medicine as your risk of pancreatitis continues to increase with high triglyceride levels.

Keep us posted!!

By the way...what dosage are you on?

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I am on 80 mg.

Just got my inital blood test. Before I started accutane, my tryglicerides(sp) were at 488. How high do you think they may get while on accutane?

WOW!!! I'm surprised your derm is even letting you start Accutane. Lots of derms pull patients off around 400. After a month on Accutane, my tests came back at 298. End of 3rd month at 424, and at the end of the 4th month at 594. In my case, my triglycerides were continuously and steadily climbing upwards. I wouldn't be surprised if your next bloodtest shows triglycerides in the late 500's or 600's. More liberal derms (like mine) will allow higher triglyceride levels (400-600) but I'm surprised your derm is even allowing you begin treatment with such elevations already. There is a point your derm will take you off the medicine as your risk of pancreatitis continues to increase with high triglyceride levels.

Keep us posted!!

By the way...what dosage are you on?

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Level mg/dL| Level mmol/L| Interpretation

<150 | <1.69 | Normal range, lowest risk

150-199 | 1.70-2.25 | Borderline high

200-499 | 2.25-5.63 | High

>500 | >5.65 | Very high, increased risk

Wikipedia

So 488 is indeed very high.

I had 66 (0,75) last time (after 1 month).

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Level mg/dL| Level mmol/L| Interpretation

<150 | <1.69 | Normal range, lowest risk

150-199 | 1.70-2.25 | Borderline high

200-499 | 2.25-5.63 | High

>500 | >5.65 | Very high, increased risk

Wikipedia

So 488 is indeed very high.

I had 66 (0,75) last time (after 1 month).

Wow, that looks bad

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Just got my inital blood test. Before I started accutane, my tryglicerides(sp) were at 488. How high do you think they may get while on accutane?

did you fast b4 the test... for at least 12 hrs??

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What are triglycerides and why do you need to test for them on accutane? I'm on accutane and I get a blood test every month but I figured it was only a preg test for Ipledge...........

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What are triglycerides and why do you need to test for them on accutane? I'm on accutane and I get a blood test every month but I figured it was only a preg test for Ipledge...........

Hypertriglyceridemia (HIGH BLOOD TRIGLYCERIDE LEVEL)

"What is hypertriglyceridemia?

Hypertriglyceridemia may be described as an excess of triglycerides in the blood. Triglycerides are fatty substances in your blood and body that get their name from their chemical structure.

Your liver produces triglycerides. Any extra calories in your diet can be changed into triglycerides. These triglycerides may also be changed into cholesterol.

The food that you consume in your diet is either used or stored. When you eat, the fat in your food is digested, and triglycerides are released into your bloodstream. This will give you energy to perform activities, or just to perform any vital functions. The rest will be stored as fat.

Although trigylceride levels vary with age, a "normal" level is considered less than 150 mg/dL. Normal values may vary from laboratory to laboratory.

Causes of hypertriglyceridemia may include:

Age - your triglyceride levels will increase with age.

Weight gain- People who are extremely overweight (obese), will have more calories converted into cholesterol and triglycerides. Excess calories from alcohol will also cause your liver to make more triglycerides, which in turn causes less fat to be removed from your blood stream.

If you have liver or kidney disease, or metabolic conditions such as hypothyroidism or diabetes, you will be placed at risk for hypertriglyceridemia.

Genetics - Increased triglyceride levels in the blood may be associated with certain genetic diseases or disorders, such as familial combined hyperlipidemia.

Medications -such as oral contraceptives, and certain steroids, may cause increased triglyceride levels

Elevated triglyceride levels may lead to pancreatitis, or inflammation of the pancreas. However, there are some individuals that may never develop pancreatitis with high triglyceride levels, or some may develop pancreatitis with lower levels.

Your doctor or healthcare provider will diagnose your disorder by a simple blood test. You must fast for 12 hours before the blood test, as any food that you eat may affect the result.

What are some symptoms to look for?

There are often times no symptoms of hypertriglyceridemia, unless you develop pancreatitis from your elevated triglyceride levels.

Things you can do:

Exercise, avoiding alcohol, fatty foods, and restricting calories are the primary treatments for elevated blood triglyceride levels. With higher levels, triglyceride-lowering medications may be used.

Follow all of your healthcare provider's instructions.

Avoid alcohol. Alcohol use will further increase your triglyceride levels, and may cause interactions with medications.

Follow the recommended diet. A low-fat, high fiber diet may be suggested to lower triglyceride levels, and reduce your weight.

Reading the labels on food is helpful to know what kinds of calories, fat and protein you are taking in. Some general recommendations include:

Carbohydrates - Carbohydrates can be either simple (such as fruit and sugar) or complex, (such as pasta and cereals). These have a great impact on blood sugar levels, are full of calories, and can turn into fats. Your diet should include around than 50% carbohydrates. Avoid unnecessary calories from sugar if you are trying to lose weight, and instead, use artificial sweeteners, such as nutrasweet, aspartame, or saccharin. Drink diet soda.

Protein - your diet should consist of 15-20% protein. Avoid red meats, fatty or fried foods (like fried fish or chicken). These contain lots of fat, and unwanted calories from the fat.

Increase fresh vegetables and fiber intake - Up to 55 grams of fiber per day is recommended. Fiber and fresh vegetables help to decrease blood cholesterol levels, maintain regular bowel habits, cause you to feel full and may prevent certain cancers.

There are many types of "good and bad" fats. The easiest thing to remember is to limit your intake of saturated fats and oils.

Make sure you tell your doctor, as well as all healthcare providers, about any other medications you are taking (including over-the-counter, vitamins, or herbal remedies).

Remind your doctor or healthcare provider if you have a history of diabetes, liver, kidney, or heart disease.

Keep yourself well hydrated. Drink two to three quarts of fluid every 24 hours, unless you are instructed otherwise.

If you experience symptoms or side effects, especially if severe, be sure to discuss them with your health care team. They can prescribe medications and/or offer other suggestions that are effective in managing such problems.

Keep all your appointments."

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These levels are also checked in your monthly blood tests while on Accutane:

SGOT: Serum Glutamic Oxaloacetic Transaminase and/or AST

SGPT = Serum Glutamic Pyruvic Transaminase and/or ALT = Alanine Aminotransferase

"Which drugs require ALT•AST monitoring?

Lipid-Lowering:

Statins: Lipitor®, Zocor®, Mevacor®, Pravachol®, Lescol®, Crestor®, Advicor®

Fibrates: Tricor®, Gemfibrozil, Lopid® Nicotinic Acid

Antidiabetic

Glitazones: Avandia®, Actos® Precose®

Antihypertensive

ACE Inhibitors

Calcium Antagonists

Selected other drugs

Accutane®, Arava®, Naprosyn®, Lamisil®, Diclofenac®, Tasmar®, Soriatane®, Methotrexate"

http://www.healthatoz.com/healthatoz/Atoz/...ferase_test.jsp

"Definition

The Aspartate aminotransferase test measures levels of AST, an enzyme released into the blood when certain organs or tissues, particularly the liver and heart, are injured. Aspartate aminotransferase (AST) is also known as serum glutamic oxaloacetic transaminase (SGOT).

Purpose

The determination of AST levels aids primarily in the diagnosis of liver disease. In the past, the AST test was used to diagnose heart attack (myocardial infarction or MI) but more accurate blood tests have largely replaced it for cardiac purposes.

Description

AST is determined by analysis of a blood sample, usually from taken from a venipuncture site at the bend of the elbow.

AST is found in the heart, liver, skeletal muscle, kidney, pancreas, spleen, lung, red blood cells, and brain tissue. When disease or injury affects these tissues, the cells are destroyed and AST is released into the bloodstream. The amount of AST is directly related to the number of cells affected by the disease or injury, but the level of elevation depends on the length of time that the blood is tested after the injury. Serum AST levels become elevated eight hours after cell injury, peak at 24-36 hours, and return to normal in three to seven days. If the cellular injury is chronic (ongoing), AST levels will remain elevated.

One of the most important uses for AST determination has formerly been in the diagnosis of a heart attack, or MI. AST can assist in determining the timing and extent of a recent MI, although it is less specific than creatine phosphokinase (CPK), CKMB, myglobin, troponins, and lactic dehydrogenase (LDH). Assuming no further cardiac injury occurs, the AST level rises within 6-10 hours after an acute attack, peaks at 12-48 hours, and returns to normal in three to four days. Myocardial injuries such as angina (chest pain) or pericarditis (inflammation of the pericardium, the membrane around the heart) do not increase AST levels.

AST is also a valuable aid in the diagnosis of liver disease. Although not specific for liver disease, it can be used in combination with other enzymes to monitor the course of various liver disorders. Chronic, silent hepatitis (hepatitis C) is sometimes the cause of elevated AST. In alcoholic hepatitis, caused by excessive alcohol ingestion, AST values are usually moderately elevated; in acute viral hepatitis, AST levels can rise to over 20 times normal. Acute extrahepatic (outside the liver) obstruction (e.g. gallstone), produces AST levels that can quickly rise to 10 times normal, and then rapidly fall. In cases of cirrhosis, the AST level is related to the amount of active inflammation of the liver. Determination of AST also assists in early recognition of toxic hepatitis that results from exposure to drugs toxic to the liver, like acetaminophen and cholesterol lowering medications.

Other disorders or diseases in which the AST determination can be valuable include acute pancreatitis, muscle disease, trauma, severe burn, and infectious mononucleosis.

Preparation

The physician may require discontinuation of any drugs that might affect the test. These types include such drugs as antihypertensives (for treatment of high blood pressure), coumarin-type anticoagulants (blood-thinning drugs), digitalis, erythromycin (an antibiotic), oral contraceptives, and opiates, among others. The patient may also need to cut back on strenuous activities temporarily, because exercise can also elevate AST for a day or two.

Risks

Risks for this test are minimal, but may include slight bleeding from the blood-drawing site, fainting or feeling lightheaded after venipuncture, or hematoma (blood accumulating under the puncture site).

Normal results

Normal ranges for the AST are laboratory-specific, but can range from 3-45 units/L (units per liter).

Abnormal results

Striking elevations of AST (400-4000 units/L) are found in almost all forms of acute hepatic necrosis, such as viral hepatitis and carbon tetrachloride poisoning. In alcoholics, even moderate doses of the analgesic acetaminophen have caused extreme elevations (1,960-29,700 units/L). Moderate rises of AST are seen in jaundice, cirrhosis, and metastatic carcinoma. Approximately 80% of patients with infectious mononucleosis show elevations in the range of 100-600 units/L."

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For those that wanted an update, it seems like my derm doesn't care about my high levels of triglycerides(sp) and cholesterol. He stopped ordering blood tests after my 2nd test. But all is well now.

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For those that wanted an update, it seems like my derm doesn't care about my high levels of triglycerides(sp) and cholesterol. He stopped ordering blood tests after my 2nd test. But all is well now.

Dude I'm in month 6 and never had a blood test during treatment although I did have one before treatment and they were good. So I dunno :whistle:

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