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Are you sure? I think they could be good cos they're pure and unprocessed, a good source of fiber and possibly zinc(?) but not sure about it cos they're a grain...

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oats are a great source of complex carbs.. nothing wrong with em.

I'm not sure what you think is the significance of "complex" carbs, but oats do have fiber, both the soluble and insoluble varieties.

Bryan

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oats are a great source of complex carbs.. nothing wrong with em.

I'm not sure what you think is the significance of "complex" carbs, but oats do have fiber, both the soluble and insoluble varieties.

Bryan

Simple carbohydrates or simple sugars – These carbs are broken down and digested very quickly, but most simple carbs contain refined sugars and very few essential vitamins and minerals. When you eat (or drink) a simple carbohydrate or a simple sugar – whether it is a can of soda, a scoop of fat-free ice cream, or even a glass of orange juice – all of the ingested sugar quickly rushes into your bloodstream.

Complex carbohydrates – The complex carbs take longer to digest and are packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals. Examples include vegetables, whole grain breads, oatmeal, legumes, brown rice and wheat pasta. When you consume the healthy complex carbs – the ones that have not been altered in a food laboratory – they are broken down into glucose molecules and used as fuel or stored in muscle and the liver as glycogen. When the body has an ample supply of glucose fuel and glycogen fuel storage, it can run efficiently.

SuperCelebs

yes..we can all put our names at the end of every post.

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If you're sensitive to gluten, they're not good for you. I don't eat them because I have a weak digestion I guess, so I avoid gluten to be safe. They also have phytic acid which binds to certain minerals and prevents their absorption (wheat has this, too). Soaking them overnight deactivates the phytic acid.

If you do eat them, don't get the instant ones.

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Complex carbohydrates – The complex carbs take longer to digest and are packed with fiber, vitamins and minerals.

Simple sugars and complex carbs are absorbed at about the same speed, other things being equal. If a specific complex carb is absorbed more slowly, it's because of the soluble fiber (or fat or protein) that accompanies it, not the "complexity" itself. The "complexity" has little or nothing to do with it.

Examples include vegetables, whole grain breads, oatmeal, legumes, brown rice and wheat pasta.

Whole wheat products like bread have glycemic indexes that are about as high as table sugar. So does brown rice. Oatmeal has a lower glycemic index because of the soluble fiber it contains. Again, "complexity" has little or nothing to do with it.

Bryan

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Oats are for sure good. The fiber in them is very important, but I also hear they have more vitamins and minerals then other grains on a gram for gram basis.

Not only that but eating a cup of oatmeal is 10g protien which can't hurt :)

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Hmm, any idea which minerals they bind with Kaleidescope? I don't think soaking them overnight is practicable really, they'd just end up as cold porridge stuck to the pan!

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Just don't bother soaking any oats that aren't raw and unprocessed. It will have zero effect since the enzyme needed to break down the antinutrients that bind to minerals will get destroyed in the heating process.

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Well i have something called 'original pure oatbran' so that's unprocessed and i guess raw as well. Maybe the heat in the process of my boiling it in hot water for 3-4 minutes will break down the antinutrients anyway?

If such antinutrients are destroyed by processing, does that mean those in wheat are also made 'safe' in the process of bread being made?

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You've got it mixed up a little. The antinutrients (bad) are not destroyed by heat (they are very resistant to heat unfortunately). It's the good guys, the enzymes needed to neutralize the antinutrients that are very heat sensitive. So if you process raw oats with heat, you will destroy the good enzymes before they get the chance to neutralize the antinutrients. In order to activate those good enzymes in raw oats, you need to soak them for 12-24 hours.

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Oh i see, i misread it. Has anyone actually tried such a procedure, and doesn't it just end up stuck to the pan?

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There are probably some raw food restaurants that do it. I know they soak rice for several weeks before they serve it.

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Hmm, any idea which minerals they bind with Kaleidescope?

Calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, and copper.

I don't think soaking them overnight is practicable really, they'd just end up as cold porridge stuck to the pan!

You soak them and then cook them.

Solros, are you saying not to cook them at all, after soaking? I just thought that soaking breaks down phytic acid, and that's all that matters.

Grains, nuts and seeds contain phytic acid and various enzyme inhibitors. Phytic acid combines with iron, calcium, magnesium, copper and zinc in the intestinal tract and thus interferes with the absorption of these minerals. Long term exposure can lead to severe health problems caused by mineral deficiencies. Enzyme inhibitors can interfere with digestion. Heat does not neutralize phytic acid or enzyme inhibitors. Soaking, fermenting, or sprouting will largely neutralize the phytic acid and enzyme inhibitors. Fermenting also helps break down gluten, a hard to digest protein. Nuts and seeds are easiest to soak and let sprout. Whole grains or flour can be soaked in an acidic medium like buttermilk, yogurt, whey, lemon juice or vinegar (1 tablespoon per 100g grain). Soak for 12-24 hours. Oats, wheat and rye are especially high in phytic acid. If you regulary eat grain based meals like oatmeal for breakfast, make sure to soak it during the night to prevent mineral deficiency.

http://www.art.eonworks.com/articles/healt...ing_habits.html

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This is really quite sad. I guess it applies to quinoa and rice also? There's no way i can soak every bloody thing i eat - i just hope that the minerals which are IN things like seeds, nuts and grains will make up for their antinutrients. A girl gotta eat SOMETHING!

Have you ever tried this sprouting lark with seeds?

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Solros, are you saying not to cook them at all, after soaking? I just thought that soaking breaks down phytic acid, and that's all that matters.

No you can still cook the oats/rice/whatever after the soaking process. Also note that a lot of different veggies and nuts contain various kinds of antinutrients, but most of them are fairly harmless (they just impair the digestion process somewhat). Steaming the veggies or roasting the nuts will make them easier to digest, so it's not a big deal.

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This is really quite sad. I guess it applies to quinoa and rice also? There's no way i can soak every bloody thing i eat - i just hope that the minerals which are IN things like seeds, nuts and grains will make up for their antinutrients. A girl gotta eat SOMETHING!

I don't think it applies to quinoa at all (it's not a true grain), and I think rice only has a small amount of phytates so it's no worry.

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Here's a good article from the Weston A. Price Foundation: http://www.westonaprice.org/foodfeatures/be_kind.html

Grains require careful preparation because they contain a number of antinutrients that can cause serious health problems. Phytic acid, for example, is an organic acid in which phosphorus is bound. It is mostly found in the bran or outer hull of seeds. Untreated phytic acid can combine with calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and especially zinc in the intestinal tract and block their absorption. This is why a diet high in improperly prepared whole grains may lead to serious mineral deficiencies and bone loss. The modern misguided practice of consuming large amounts of unprocessed bran often improves colon transit time at first but may lead to irritable bowel syndrome and, in the long term, many other adverse effects.

Other antinutrients in whole grains include enzyme inhibitors which can inhibit digestion and put stress on the pancreas; irritating tannins; complex sugars which the body cannot break down; and gluten and related hard-to-digest proteins which may cause allergies, digestive disorders and even mental illness.

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Do ya reckon just soaking the oats in WATER overnight will be enough, i know it recommends using something acidic like vinegar but that would make it taste horrible!

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Do ya reckon just soaking the oats in WATER overnight will be enough, i know it recommends using something acidic like vinegar but that would make it taste horrible!

theyre just oats.

oats. gah.

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my mom soaks oats in milk or soymilk overnight if she wants them for breakfast in the morning, but its just to make them cook faster.

i think everyone here needs to read Meagan's thread...

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