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Lecithin

I'm interested in taking lecithin since i've read good things about it helping to break down bad fats in the liver, does anyone have more info on this?

I've seen lecithin granules sold, but they seem to be made of soya which is obviously a thing to avoid, but does the soya issue matter for lecithin granules i wonder?

Has anyone had good effects from taking this supplement?

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Isn't lecithin from soy the same as animial derived lecithin (like from egg yolks)???

I was always under the impression that lecithin was just a mixture of phosphilipids....

Anyway....it's a good source of phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl inositol, phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidic acid and linoleic acid, which the body needs to maintain healthy membrane function....

Not too sure of the effects on the liver though.....It's an good emulsifier (used sometimes in cosmetics and creams and lotions) and also is a great emulsifer for baking....as a cosmetic chemist who has a baking hobby I'm pretty familiar with the stuff....It's supposed to be good for cardiovascular health becuse of it's emulsifying abilities..... I guess it could help out with bad fats in the liver, but I'm not too keen on all that liver cleansing stuff....

I have some at my house that I use for baking, and sometimes I mix it in my yogurt or in my cereal.....If it weren't for my topicals I'd still have acne though.....

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Isn't lecithin from soy the same as animial derived lecithin (like from egg yolks)???

I was always under the impression that lecithin was just a mixture of phosphilipids....

Anyway....it's a good source of phosphatidyl choline, phosphatidyl inositol, phosphatidyl ethanolamine and phosphatidic acid and linoleic acid, which the body needs to maintain healthy membrane function....

Not too sure of the effects on the liver though.....It's an good emulsifier (used sometimes in cosmetics and creams and lotions) and also is a great emulsifer for baking....as a cosmetic chemist who has a baking hobby I'm pretty familiar with the stuff....It's supposed to be good for cardiovascular health becuse of it's emulsifying abilities..... I guess it could help out with bad fats in the liver, but I'm not too keen on all that liver cleansing stuff....

I have some at my house that I use for baking, and sometimes I mix it in my yogurt or in my cereal.....If it weren't for my topicals I'd still have acne though.....

It definately has a huge impact on the liver...it is an integral part of a liver cleansing diet because it clears toxins...just like LSA mix (linseed, sunflower & almond) does. This is incredible at clearing the skin coupled with something like antibiotics or accutane. Get it from the health food shop and watch your skin become great...i've been sprinkling 1-2 tablespoons on my cereal in the morn for about 1 month and i haven't had any breakouts at all...so thus it seems a congested liver was the key to me getting acne.

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You mean that eating a mixture of those seeds cleared you up, rather than taking lecithin granules?

Is it possible to overdoes on lecithin?

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That was a v interesting article - if a little difficult to get my head round. Should we basically conclude that soy lecithin should be avoided despite its ability to break down liver fats?

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When I took lecithin I didn't notice any improvment. In fact, I believe it contributed to my breakouts. Here's a good article http://www.westonaprice.org/soy/lecithin.html

I took it too until I read that article, h0ppy. I don't really understand why Shelley recommends it. Isn't guggal supposed to do the same thing - take fats out of the liver?

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It doesn't say soy lecithin is necessarily that bad unless you have a soy allergy though, does it? (confused)

Has anyone here taken guggal, is it expensive? (I heard Gold Coin Grass is good but it's too expensive for me.)

I guess the only alternative to lecithin is ACV then...

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Most lecithin (it depends exactly on the source) is pretty rich in polyunsaturated fatty acids, so the stuff is highly susceptible to oxidation, just like other similar fats. DO NOT BUY OR CONSUME COMMERCIAL LECITHIN, unless you can find a specific brand that has the fat removed and/or is protected by powerful antioxidants. For example, TwinLab has a brand of phosphatidyl choline which has most of the fat removed, and is protected with (if I remember correctly) un-esterified vitamin E and ascorbyl palmitate.

Here is a passage on lecithin from one of Pearson & Shaw's books (all the italics and bold text is their own):

"WARNING: Much of the lecithin available to consumers is probably badly peroxidized (rancid). Polyunsaturated fats comprise much of the commercial lecithin, and these polyunsaturated fats can become hazardously peroxidized before a rancid odor can be smelled. Indeed, most store bought commercial lecithin we have smelled has been so badly peroxidized that the rancid odor was obvious. Dr. Harry Demopoulos of New York University Medical Center recently tested one bottle each of two major name brand lecithin consumer products. These samples were purchased off the shelf at two health food stores in high traffic locations. The analytical standard for good lecithin was provided by Sigma Chemical Company and was sealed in glass under dry nitrogen to prevent oxidation.

"Gas-liquid chromatography was used by Dr. Demopoulos to measure the arachidonic acid (an essential polyunsaturated fatty acid) content. Both commercial lecithin products showed a loss of about 90%, indicating very extensive peroxidation. Another assay, the thiobarbituric acid (TBA) test, showed about 500 nanomoles per milliliter of TBA reactive organic peroxide decomposition products. The TBA test can be expected to understate the degree of peroxidation under these conditions. DO NOT CONSUME PEROXIDIZED (RANCID) FATS, INCLUDING PEROXIDIZED LECITHIN. Peroxidized fats are mutagenic (damage DNA), carcinogenic (cause cancer), thrombogenic (cause abnormal blood clots), atherogenic (cause atherosclerosis), and suppress the immune system.

"Regretfully, we must recommend against using lecithin until this problem is solved. We suggest that the manufacturers of these products make them available containing a carefully designed system of powerful natural or synthetic antioxidants and chelating agents."

Bryan

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Yikes... guess I won't be buying lecithin again.

Has anyone here taken guggal, is it expensive? (I heard Gold Coin Grass is good but it's too expensive for me.)

I guess the only alternative to lecithin is ACV then...

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I thought the 'stones' WERE the stuck fats in the liver (aren't the stones made of fat?)

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I thought the 'stones' WERE the stuck fats in the liver (aren't the stones made of fat?)

Hmm... yeah, I guess they are. But still there's a difference between softening and flushing out stones and cleansing the liver of fats... At least, that's my understanding from what I've read.

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