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Bonobo Man

Dietary Research, your thoughts?

What do you guys make of this study?

Personally, I have had great success with low glycemic load meals, eaten frequently throughout the day. However, I don't really eat this much protein.

ABSTRACT 1

"Smith R, Mann N, Braue A, Varigos G. The effect of a low glycemic load, high protein diet on hormonal markers of acne. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14 Suppl:S43.

Background - Acne vulgaris is a common endocrine condition affecting adolescents in Western civilizations. Acne typically manifests during puberty when there is a transient decrease in insulin sensitivity. It has been suggested that high glycemic nutrition during puberty induces hyperinsulinemia which increases the bioavailability of androgens and certain growth factors. These changes may induce follicular epithelial growth and increased sebum production - two factors responsible for acne proliferation.

Objective - To determine the effect of a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low glycemic index (GI) foods, on hormonal makers of acne vulgaris.

Design - Male acne sufferers [n=43, age=18.3+/-0.4 (mean +/- SEM)] were randomly assigned to either the dietary intervention (n=23) or control groups (n=20). The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% energy from low glycemic index carbohydrates. The control group received no information about diet nor were they given dietary instruction. Venous blood was collected at baseline and 12-weeks for an assessment of testosterone, sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), free androgen index (FAI), dehydroepiandrosterone - sulfate (DHEA-S), insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I and IGF-binding proteins -I and -3.

Outcomes - Dietary intervention resulted in a significant reduction in FAI (-9.1 +/- 4.5, P<0.05) and DHEA-S (-0.72 +/- 0.33 umol/L, P<0.05) and an increase in IGFBP-1 (5.3 +/- 1.6 ng/mL, P<0.01). No significant changes were observed in levels of IGF-I, IGFBP-3, testosterone or SHBG following dietary intervention. The control group showed no change in any of the blood parameters measured.

Conclusion - These data suggest that a low glycemic load diet may reduce androgenic activity (as indicated by a reduction in FAI and DHEA-S) and may oppose the growth promoting effects of IGF-I by increasing levels of its binding protein, IGFBP-I. This implies that a low glycemic load diet may reduce hormonal influences involved in acne pathogenesis."

ABSTRACT 2

"Smith R, Mann N, Braue A, Varigos G. Low glycemic load, high protein diet lessens facial acne severity. Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2005;14 Suppl:S97.

Background - Acne vulgaris is a multi-factorial skin disorder which affects the 85-100% of the adolescent population in Western civilizations. Despite its high prevalence in the West, acne prevalence is extremely low or rare in non-westernized societies. It has been proposed that refined, high glycemic foods common in Western societies may accentuate underlying causal factors responsible for its proliferation.

Objective - To determine whether a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low GI foods, can alleviate the severity of acne symptoms in young males.

Design - Male acne sufferers [n=43, age=18.3 +/- 0.4 (mean +/- SEM)] were randomly assigned to either the dietary intervention (n=23) or control groups (n=20). The intervention diet consisted of 25% energy from protein and 45% energy from low glycemic index carbohydrates. The control group received no information about diet nor were they given dietary instruction. The efficacy of dietary treatment versus control was clinically assessed by a dermatologist using a modified Cunliffe-Leeds acne scale. The dermatologist assessed facial acne by means of lesion counts and was blinded to the subject's group.

Outcomes - Dietary intervention resulted in a reduction in total lesion counts (-23.1 +/- 4.0 lesions, P <0.001) and inflammatory counts (-16.2 +/- 3.0 lesions, P <0.001). The control group also showed a reduction in total lesion counts (-12.0 +/- 3.5 lesions, P <0.01) and inflammatory counts (-7.4 +/- 2.5 lesions, P <0.05). However, between group analyses showed that the reduction was significantly greater in the intervention group for total counts (P <0.05) and inflammatory counts (P <0.05).

Conclusion - These data indicate that a low glycemic load diet, comprised of high levels of protein and low GI foods, significantly decreased the mean number of facial acne lesions, therefore alleviating the severity of acne symptoms. However, the multi-factorial nature of this condition is reflected in the fact that the control group also showed a decrease over time, thereby suggesting that other factors are at play."

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