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Neuvo wavo

Can antibiotics make acne worse long term?

I used to have moderate acne, but I would consider my acne to be mild. However, my acne does go in waves (sometimes I am more clear than others). I am just afriad that if I stop taking my Doryx that I will get a huge breakout. I was on dynacin for about 5 years before doryx, then my derm switched me to doryx about 2 years ago.

Is your derm on crack? No seriously. Did your derm switch you from dynacin to doryx after five years because you were still breaking out? No wonder. Is it the same derm? Minocycline, like many broad spectrum antibiotics can pose a risk of bacterial resistance and can also cause cross-resistance of these bacteria to other tetracyclines (like doryx). Clindamycin also carries a risk of antibiotic resistance, especially after 7 years of use.

These antibiotics don't work forever. You can't very well just take them for the rest of you life (this is where my opinion differs from my derm's). Have you ever even been on a retinoid for acne? I'm not saying you should switch to one, but I find it odd that a derm would only prescribe antibiotics for acne without some other from of treatment. And I find it amazing that you have been on the same antibiotic for two years.

How often do you need to spot treat? If you were clear from the two antibiotics doryx and the clindamycin wipes, you really shouldn't need to spot treat that often at all......

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These antibiotics don't work forever. You can't very well just take them for the rest of you life (this is where my opinion differs from my derm's). Have you ever even been on a retinoid for acne? I'm not saying you should switch to one, but I find it odd that a derm would only prescribe antibiotics for acne without some other from of treatment. And I find it amazing that you have been on the same antibiotic for two years.

I'm amazed that you don't seem to understand the situation.

The problem is, that retinoids haven't been shown to give permanent clearance either, with the exception of (isotretinoin) Accutane. Even topical isotretinoin (Retin-A) doesn't give permanent clearance. (That should be obvious, nobody would ever take Accutane due to the systemic issues if Retin-A worked.)

The thing is, he's on two different antibiotics. The chances of picking up a tetracycline resistant bug eventually is quite high, but even then might take a few years (I was on minocycline for 3-4 years without problems). The chances of picking up a bug resistant to both clindamycin AND tetracyclines is even more unlikely and would be likely to take longer. And even if that did happen he could take a different antibiotic to wipe out the resistant species (e.g. erythromycin, and there's *lots* of other drugs out there you can use off label that work too.)

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It is the same derm. He's also highly respected, and he is very nice (not saying that everything he does is 100% correct). I use the BP as spot treatment about once every 10 days or so (only when I see a noticible pimple forming, then I zap it). So I don't use it all that often.

He switched me from dynacin to doryx because he said that dynacin has the risk of discoloring skin after prolonged use.

Hmmm interesting.......

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antibiotics cleared my acne then my body got resistant to them and my acne broke out worse than ever and i mean bad so now im on new drugs which im sure my body will got resisitant 2 den ma acne will probally get worse again :(

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I've used antibiotics for a long time. I'm 25 now, and I took my first oral antibiotic for acne at 18. I've never really had bad acne, but it is persistant. It didn't help that my diet was very poor during my college years either. I have since changed my bad behaviors, and I am eating well and exercising frequently.

My old dermatologist that I saw for about 6 years really wanted me to be off of antibiotics because of some of the concerns listed in this thread. I was weaned off of Bactrim and eventually I stopped taking it completely. So towards the end of the year I was only taking Finacea and some OTC gentle acne cleansers. I still got some small whiteheads hear and there, but for the most part my skin looked better than it had in quite a while. Then in early January I got 2 big zits on my chin (always has been my trouble area), and I went in to see a new dermatologist. He gave me the news I was dreading. He wanted me to go back on antibiotics for few months. So now I am back on Bactrim (a broad based antibiotic), Duac 5%/1% and Brevoxyl 4%. I haven't got a single pimple in over a month. However, my skin is healing very poorly. I have lots of red marks left over that aren't really healing at all. I never remembered having any issues like this before.

My confidence is certainly lowered (I have spurts of depression), but I am determined to stick with my lifestyle changes in the hopes that I will grow out of this stupid disease eventually.

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I haven't got a single pimple in over a month.

:dance:

However, my skin is healing very poorly. I have lots of red marks left over that aren't really healing at all. I never remembered having any issues like this before.

Red marks practically always disappear; they're not true scars. In the meantime coverup makeup works well if used judiciously.

My confidence is certainly lowered (I have spurts of depression), but I am determined to stick with my lifestyle changes in the hopes that I will grow out of this stupid disease eventually.

If you're 25 you may not.

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Super Bump

Didn't feel like creating a new thread, so yea... Should I tell my derm to wean me off doxy, since I've been taking it for 2 years now, along with Differin, and I'm kind of worried about future health problems. Right now I'm trying the DKR regimen to take care of the mild break outs that I have, since I guess the doxy isn't working that well no more. I'm kind of worried that my acne is going to come with a vengeance if I stop, even though I'll be doing the DKR regimen with differin at the time. Any advice?

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Super Bump

Didn't feel like creating a new thread, so yea... Should I tell my derm to wean me off doxy, since I've been taking it for 2 years now, along with Differin, and I'm kind of worried about future health problems. Right now I'm trying the DKR regimen to take care of the mild break outs that I have, since I guess the doxy isn't working that well no more. I'm kind of worried that my acne is going to come with a vengeance if I stop, even though I'll be doing the DKR regimen with differin at the time. Any advice?

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A Gut Reaction to Antibiotics.

by Carol Potera

Is the explosive rise in asthma and allergies being seen especially in children partially related to antibiotic use? Epidemiologic studies have found strong connections between antibiotic treatment and the later development of asthma and allergies. Yet, until recently, no studies had looked at how the two are linked. Now researchers at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor have created a mouse model that offers clues to the mechanism behind the association.

Immunologist Gary Huffnagle and colleagues are the first to demonstrate in a mouse model that the disruption of beneficial intestinal bacteria by antibiotics allows yeast to take hold and flourish. They developed their mouse model specifically to study the relationship between antibiotic use and allergies. When mice inhale fungal spores known to trigger allergies in people, the allergic reaction is more potent in mice with an overgrowth of yeast in their guts.

In their studies, the Michigan researchers first treat mice for several days with the broad-spectrum antibiotic cefoperazone to destroy the gut flora. Then the mice are fed Candida albicans, a yeast that commonly lives in people. "This represents the clinical scenario of getting a yeast infection after taking antibiotics," says Huffnagle. Next, the mice are exposed nasally to spores of the mold Aspergillus fumigatus (a major indoor contaminant) and to egg white protein.

Results are showing that both allergens produce significant increases in inflammation-related white blood cells in the lungs of the mice, and they elevate blood levels of key markers of allergic reactions, including IgE, interleukin-5, and interleukin-13. Mice not treated with antibiotics show much milder reactions to the allergens. The team's latest report appears in the January 2005 issue of Infection and Immunity. Future work with the model will investigate the actions of other antibiotics (such as amoxicillin) and allergens (such as pollen and dust mites).

How do changes in gut flora influence respiratory allergies? The answer likely involves oral tolerance, Huffnagle theorizes. Upon ingestion of allergens, the oral mucosa generate regulatory T cells, which circulate to the respiratory tract, where they suppress allergic reactions. "We live in a dirty world, and we swallow mold spores, pollen, dust, and other allergens constantly," says Huffnagle. These oral allergens trigger immune responses that instruct the rest of the body to be more tolerant of allergens so allergic reactions don't occur. Moreover, other studies have indicated that mice lacking gut flora cannot generate oral tolerance. When the gut flora are restored, oral tolerance returns.

Huffnagle plans to evaluate over-the-counter probiotics--concentrated supplements of beneficial bacteria--to identify which, if any, work best for replenishing gut flora. "[Probiotics are a] relatively new concept, and there's not a lot of precedent for their use now," says infectious disease specialist Bruce Klein of the University of Wisconsin-Madison. If future studies show that probiotics do replace flora, Klein adds, physicians may be inclined to recommend their use. Eating yogurt with live cultures also remains a good way to replenish gut flora following a course of antibiotics.

Publication Information: Article Title: A Gut Reaction to Antibiotics. Contributors: Carol Potera - author. Journal Title: Environmental Health Perspectives. Volume: 113. Issue: 6. Publication Year: 2005. Page Number: 372. COPYRIGHT 2005 National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences; COPYRIGHT 2005 Gale Group

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I took antibiotics. Cleared up my cystic back acne. Haven't had a pimple on my face in a while. Been a year at least since i last had a bad breakout of more than 2 pimples. Personally for me, they didnt come back any harder...

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i just had surgery yesterday and i had a huge dose of antibiotics in the hospital and have taken 4 pills since i got home.

I'm on Keflex..I think I feel some cysts forming on my chin and I see blackheads where I havent before..could it be from the antibiotics?

I'm also getting itchy and if it continues i'll go to the ER tomorrow. But you know, I'm more concerned with my face than my itching. :(

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Hmmm, I've thought about this.

Since most people wont take antibiotics for life, I think this is the most common long term antibiotic situation:

Go on antibiotics for years, come off them, have your body return exactly how it was before going on antibiotics (have no idea how long this takes, for your system to 'normalise').

In this case I believe your skin will now be how it would if you had never taken antibiotics. In terms of the current acne intensity.

However, in the phase of your body returning to normal (after years on antibiotics then stopping), I believe your acne can be considerably worse than it would ever be. Possibly more so if antibiotics never made you 100% clear at any time.

I think this because when you take antibiotics, the bacteria fights. The bacteria builds resistance. Over years this bacteria is then considerably different to what it would ever be if you'd never taken antibiotics. Then, once you take the antibiotics away, that new and much 'harder' bacteria is free to rage it's war against your skin with no resistance from antibiotics whatsoever as you stopped taking them. The bacteria was used to fighting, and no doubt still being able to create pimples to some extent. Take away the antibiotic and boom. In this period I think your skin can be considerably worse.

After time the super potent bacteria will return to how it would be had you never taken antibiotics. And so then your skin will be how it would had you never taken antibiotics. In terms of current acne intensity.

I say 'in terms of current acne intensity' because there are other factors of course. Scars you have avoided while on antibiotics when they had reduced your acne. And maybe antibiotics tided you over to where you naturally don't get acne anymore. So when you drop the antibiotics, you keep clear skin.

Ramble, ramble. I've thought about this, but I haven't done scientific research. :D

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