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I found a product that works better than Green Cream and is much safer for your skin long term!

My dermatologist told me that if you use Green Cream long term (for several years) it will destroy your skin because of the toxic ingredients.

I now use Garden of Wisdom Vita ReSurface Cream. Here is the complete ingredient list:

Rose Geranium Hydrosol; Rice Bran Oil CP/Unrefined; Sodium PCA;

Polawax NF; Glycercin; All-Trans Retinol; Galactobarian; Optiphen

They offer this in either .5% or 1% retinol.

www.gardenofwisdom.com/catalog/item/5875289/5730491.htm

www.gardenofwisdom.com/catalog/item/5875289/6001148.htm

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Each to their own, of course, and there are a lot of good retinol products out there now.

But how do you know this one works better than Green Cream?

Also .... I've been using GC for about 3 years now. Skin is the best it's ever been. I think your dermatologist may be exaggerating. :)

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Each to their own, of course, and there are a lot of good retinol products out there now.

But how do you know this one works better than Green Cream?

Also .... I've been using GC for about 3 years now. Skin is the best it's ever been. I think your dermatologist may be exaggerating. :)

I have used both Green Cream and Retin-A before using the GoW product.

My dermatologist has told me the key to any retinoid is to use it long term to gain maximum benefits. So, if you are going to use a product long term then you want ingredients that are NOT toxic for your skin.

My doctor is not the only one who says its harmful to use a product that is more than 50% Ethanol (along with toxic colored dyes).

I'm glad it's working for you now, but unfortunately it may end up causing your skin severe damage in the future.

We are not talking about a simple cleanser that you rinse off, this is a product that is continually applied and actually penetrates your skin!

Think about it.

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I am curious where you are getting your information, Dave. For example, this bit about the Green Cream formulation containing more than 50% ethanol .... where'd you get that figure from? I have not been able to confirm it. Since ethanol is listed as the second ingredient on the label, it seems to me that it is mathematically impossible for it to be present in a concentration of 50% or more. I have a query in to Advanced Skin Technology, but would like to know where you came up with your figure.

Also, could you please share whatever background information you have on the toxicity of topical ethanol? Perhaps link to the studies you are getting your info from? I can only find information on the toxicity of ingested ethanol. Topical ethanol seems to be quite broadly used in the pharmaceutical industry and I cannot find any published information on it being a health hazard.

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Once again: those studies show that ORAL ethanol is toxic. I do not see anything on that page that shows that small amounts of topical ethanol are toxic.

Topical ethanol is irritating in sufficient doses ... some people are certainly more sensitive than others, and I do recommend that those people avoid GC. For most of us, it's really not an issue.

And, Dave, you still haven't explained where you came up with that "more than 50%" figure. Which I now know to be WILDLY incorrect. You aren't even in the ballpark. You are off by about a factor of 10.

Given the level of misinformation in your posts, I seriously doubt that an actual dermatologist made any recommendation whatsoever.

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Once again: those studies show that ORAL ethanol is toxic. I do not see anything on that page that shows that small amounts of topical ethanol are toxic.

Topical ethanol is irritating in sufficient doses ... some people are certainly more sensitive than others, and I do recommend that those people avoid GC. For most of us, it's really not an issue.

And, Dave, you still haven't explained where you came up with that "more than 50%" figure. Which I now know to be WILDLY incorrect. You aren't even in the ballpark. You are off by about a factor of 10.

Given the level of misinformation in your posts, I seriously doubt that an actual dermatologist made any recommendation whatsoever.

I guess you did not really read that page.

Scroll down and you can see all of the studies on skin contact.

www.cosmeticsdatabase.com/ingredient.php?ingred06=702285

You can say all you want about your favorite product, but the facts are the facts, no matter what their corporate sale manager tells you - it's a very toxic product and prolonged use will cause damage.

Try reading a US Government MSDS if you want more -.

May cause central nervous system depression. Causes severe eye irritation. Causes respiratory tract irritation. Causes moderate skin irritation.

This substance has caused adverse reproductive and fetal effects in humans. Warning! May cause liver, kidney and

heart damage.

Target Organs: Kidneys, heart, central nervous system, liver.

Potential Health Effects

Eye: Causes severe eye irritation. May cause painful sensitization to light. May cause chemical conjunctivitis and corneal

damage.

Skin: Causes moderate skin irritation. May cause cyanosis of the extremities.

Ingestion: May cause gastrointestinal irritation with nausea, vomiting and diarrhea. May cause systemic toxicity with

acidosis. May cause central nervous system depression, characterized by excitement, followed by headache, dizziness,

drowsiness, and nausea. Advanced stages may cause collapse, unconsciousness, coma and possible death due to

respiratory failure.

Inhalation: Inhalation of high concentrations may cause central nervous system effects characterized by nausea,

headache, dizziness, unconsciousness and coma. Causes respiratory tract irritation. May cause narcotic effects in high

concentration. Vapors may cause dizziness or suffocation.

Chronic: May cause reproductive and fetal effects. Laboratory experiments have resulted in mutagenic effects. Animal

studies have reported the development of tumors. Prolonged exposure may cause liver, kidney, and heart damage.

PS I'll let my doctor know that you don't believe in him. You're probably gonna make him feel like Santa Claus now. ;-(

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Once again, you are going on and on about the effects of INGESTED ethanol. Other than "moderate skin irritation", what have you got on TOPICAL ethanol? And I might add that topical ethanol has to be of sufficiently high concentration (and sufficiently frequent usage) to cause skin irritation. The small amount (NOT 50%) in GC does not qualify.

That site you directed me to says, quite clearly:

Potential risks from ethanol in personal care products are dwarfed by risks posed from the consumption of alcoholic beverages.

Yet consuming a small to moderate amount of alcohol daily has been shown to actually have health benefits. It's all about how much you use .... which is true with many, many, many substances in this world.

So why should anyone with a grain of sense freak about about the tiny amount of topical ethanol in GC? You are blowing the whole thing completely out of proportion .... not to mention telling absolute falsehoods. How about your "more than 50%" figure .... you still haven't explained that, though I have asked you about it repeatedly.

Oh, and the colors in the formulation? Not toxic either.

If you don't want to use GC, then by all means don't use it. But I see no point in spreading wilful misinformation.

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Telling everyone about toxic ingredients in products is a very good thing!

It's not just Green Cream, but many many other products as well.

You can keep your head in the sand as long as you want, and I'm sorry if the truth hurts.

If you scroll down that web site to near the bottom you can read all about the studies done on skin contact, but I know now that your only interest is making sure no one says anything bad about your favorite product.

You are only gonna believe what you want to believe, you have made that clear to me.

But the truth is many products are being sold and a lot of money is being made on products that either do nothing or even worse end up causing long term health problems for people - and Green Cream is one of them for sure.

Green Cream even says on their website that the only reason they add colored dye is so women will buy it.

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lol, the "truth" is exactly what I'm waiting to hear.

First: I'm still waiting to hear where you came up with that "more than 50%" figure. Right now it's sure looking to me like it came out of your own imagination.

Second: Still waiting to see actual scientific proof that the tiny amount of topical ethanol in GC is toxic to humans. Ditto the coloring agents. Because the studies I am seeing do not indicate any such thing.

My head is right here, not in the sand. I'm happy to wait.

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lol, the "truth" is exactly what I'm waiting to hear.

First: I'm still waiting to hear where you came up with that "more than 50%" figure. Right now it's sure looking to me like it came out of your own imagination.

Second: Still waiting to see actual scientific proof that the tiny amount of topical ethanol in GC is toxic to humans. Ditto the coloring agents. Because the studies I am seeing do not indicate any such thing.

My head is right here, not in the sand. I'm happy to wait.

This is my last post on this subject because it is clear to me that your only intent is to make sure no one says anything bad about your favorite product.

This paragraph is from Paula Begoun (and you can also get this info from the FDA):

inactive ingredient. The list of inactive ingredients is the part of an ingredient label that is not regulated by the FDA other than the requirement that it be a complete list of the contents in descending order of concentration; that is, the ingredient with the largest concentration is listed first, then the next largest, and so forth. Thousands and thousands of inactive ingredients are used in cosmetics, and there is controversy about how truly inactive these substances are in regard to safety as well as about their long-term or short-term effects on skin or the human body.

So, if Green Cream is not 50% Ethanol, it's more than 50% water, so you are paying for some mighty expensive water there.

Lastly,

since you were either too lazy or lets just say not bright enough to scroll to the bottom of the web page to see all of the studies (many on SKIN CONTACT) I will post them for you.

Goodbye.

GOVERNMENT, INDUSTRY, ACADEMIC STUDIES AND CLASSIFICATIONS

government/industry list/academic study appears on list as classification(s)

European Union - Classification & Labelling ETHANOL Highly flammable

Highly flammable

FDA Food Additive Status ETHYL ALCOHOL Food additive: inhibitor

GRAS (generally recognized as safe) - use in food presumed safe based either on a history of use before 1958 or on published scientific evidence; need not be approved by the FDA prior to use in food; most have not limit for use but must conform to good manufacturing practices; some GRAS substances have quantitative limit for use in foods; by definition under Sec 201(s) of FD&C Act, not food additives - CFR184.1293; 2.0% by weight - On pizza crusts prior to baking - CFR170.3

Used in food processing: sanitizing agent

Food additive: food additive for which a petition has been filed and a regulation issued

Food additive: must be in accordance with good manufacturing practices, or sufficient for purpose; or in quantity not greater than required

Adequate drainage - CFR178.1010

Assoc of Occupational and Environmental Clinics - Asthmagens ETHANOL Solvent

Assoc of Occupational and Environmental Clinics - Asthmagens ETHANOL Solvent

Assoc of Occupational and Environmental Clinics - Asthmagens ETHANOL Solvent

Assoc of Occupational and Environmental Clinics - Asthmagens ETHANOL Solvent

Assoc of Occupational and Environmental Clinics - Asthmagens ETHANOL Solvent

FDA Everything Added to Food ETHYL ALCOHOL There is reported use of the substance, but it has not yet been assigned for toxicology literature search.

National Library of Medicine HazMap ETHYL ALCOHOL Reproductive Toxin - A chemical that is toxic to the reproductive system, including defects in the progeny and injury to male and female reproductive function: Yes;

Hepatotoxin: Hepatotoxin, Secondary;

Neurotoxin: CNS Solvent Syndrome;

PEL (OSHA) - Permissible exposure limit (OSHA): 1000 ppm;

RD50 - Concentration producing a 50% decrease in respiratory rate in experimental animals following a 10-minute exposure: 27314 ppm;

LC50 - Lethal concentration in 50% of animals tested: 40727 ppm;

IARC Carcinogen - International Agency for Research on Cancer; classifies chemicals as established (1), probable (2a), or possible (2b) human carcinogens: Known Carcinogen;

TLV (ACGIH) - Threshold limit value (ACGIH): 1000 ppm;

Flammability (NFPA) - NFPA flammability code: 0 = will not burn; 1 = must be preheated; 2 = high ambient temp required; 3 = may ignite at ambient temp; 4 = burn readily: 3: may ignite at ambient temperature;

IDLH (NIOSH) - Immediately Dangerous to Life or Health: 3300 ppm;

Odor Threshold High - The lowest concentration at which a substance can be detected or recognized using the sense of smell: 716 ppm;

Odor Threshold Low - The lowest concentration at which a substance can be detected or recognized using the sense of smell: 49 ppm;

MAK - Maximum Allowable Concentration (Federal Republic of Germany): 500 ppm;

Mutalik S, Udupa N, 2003 ETHANOL Ethanol has been found to act as a penetration enhancer for many chemicals.

Frazier , L, 1998 ETHANOL Reproductive Toxicity Hazards: suspected

Harvell, J, 1994 ETHANOL Skin or Sense Organ Toxicity Hazards: suspected

A Relational Database of Hazardous Chemicals and Occupational Diseases, 2002 ETHANOL Cancer Hazards: suspected

Jankovic, J, 1996 ETHANOL Developmental Toxicity Hazards: suspected

Klaassen, C, 1996 ETHANOL Gastrointestinal or Liver Toxicity Hazards: suspected

RTECS®- TLV/BEI,2005 ETHANOL occupationally related - ACGIH TLV (human TWA)

RTECS®- TLV/BEI,2006 ETHANOL occupationally related - ACGIH TLV (human TWA)

RTECS®- "Prehled Prumyslove Toxikologie; Organicke Latky," Marhold, J 1986 ETHANOL sense organ - Primary eye irritant (rabbit )

skin - Primary skin irritant (rabbit )

RTECS®- Acta Cytologica 1972 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis ( human fbr)

RTECS®- Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica 1976 ETHANOL biochemical - Dehydrogenases (rat TDLo)

biochemical - Hepatic microsomal mixed oxidase (dealkylation, hydroxylation, etc.) (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica 1981 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: other mutation test systems (rat orl)

RTECS®- Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 1977 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis ( human lym)

mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Dominant Lethal Strain (mouse orl)

mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Micronucleus test (mouse ipr)

RTECS®- American Journal of Diseases of Children 1975 ETHANOL reproductive - Apgar score (woman TDLo)

developmental - Drug dependence (woman TDLo)

RTECS®- American Journal of Diseases of Children 1980 ETHANOL reproductive - Apgar score (woman TDLo)

RTECS®- American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1983 ETHANOL reproductive - Other effects on embryo (woman TDLo)

RTECS®- American Journal of Ophthalmology 1946 ETHANOL sense organ - Primary eye irritant (rabbit )

RTECS®- Biologisches Zentralblatt 1987 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (hamster ovr)

RTECS®- Cancer Letters (Shannon, Ireland) 1981 ETHANOL mutagenic - blood tumor formations - equivocal (mouse TDLo)

cancer - liver tumor formations - equivocal (mouse TDLo)

RTECS®- Cytobios 1988 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: other mutation test systems (rat ipr)

RTECS®- Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics 1980 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Sister Chromatid Exchange ( human lym)

RTECS®- Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics 1987 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Sex Chromosome Loss and Nondisjunction (mouse orl)

RTECS®- Cytology and Genetics (English Translation) 1981 ETHANOL reproductive - Cytological changes (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Digestive Diseases and Sciences 1980 ETHANOL metabolic - Weight loss or decreased weight gain (rat TDLo)

liver - Changes in liver weight (rat TDLo)

liver - Fatty liver degeneration (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- EHP, Environmental Health Perspectives 1979 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Sex Chromosome Loss and Nondisjunction ( Aspergillis nidulans )

RTECS®- Eisei Shikenjo Hokoku 1985 ETHANOL reproductive - Musculoskeletal system (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Environmental Mutagenesis 1986 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (hamster ovr)

RTECS®- Environmental Research 1990 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Mutation in Micro-organism (Salmonella typhimurium )

RTECS®- Food and Chemical Toxicology 1982 ETHANOL sense organ - Primary eye irritant (rabbit )

RTECS®- Genetika (Moscow) 1979 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Mutation in Micro-organism (Saccharomyces cerevisiae )

RTECS®- International Journal of Fertility 1969 ETHANOL reproductive - Female fertility index (woman TDLo)

RTECS®- International Journal of Fertility 1978 ETHANOL reproductive - Spermatogenesis (rat TDLo)

reproductive - Testes, epididymis, sperm duct (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Journal of Toxicological Sciences 1983 ETHANOL cardiovascular - Changes in heart weight (rat TDLo)

blood - Changes in serum composition (eg., TP, bilirubin, cholesterol) (rat TDLo)

endocrine system - Changes in testicular weight (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health 1982 ETHANOL reproductive - Eye, ear (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- MSHA STANDARD-air: 3,103,1971 ETHANOL occupationally related - MSHA STANDARD-air (human TWA)

RTECS®- Mutagenesis 1988 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (hamster emb)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1983 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Sister Chromatid Exchange (hamster ovr)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1984 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Mutation in Micro-organism (Escherichia coli )

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1984 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA repair (Escherichia coli )

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1992 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Sex Chromosome Loss and Nondisjunction (Drosophila melanogaster orl)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1995 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA Damage (Saccharomyces cerevisiae )

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1995 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA Damage (rat orl)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 2001 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA Adduct (rat orl)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1977 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Mutation in Micro-organism ( Aspergillis nidulans )

mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Gene Conversion and Mitotic Recombination ( Aspergillis nidulans )

RTECS®- Mutation Research 2003 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis ( human lym)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 2003 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (other fish ims)

mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Micronucleus test (other fish ims)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 2004 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis ( human orl)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 2005 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA Damage (Salmonella typhimurium )

mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA repair (Salmonella typhimurium )

RTECS®- Mutation Research 2005 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: (rat orl)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1979 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: sperm (mouse orl)

RTECS®- Mutation Research 1979 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Sister Chromatid Exchange (mouse orl)

RTECS®- Nature 1983 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (mouse orl)

RTECS®- Naturwissenschaften 1964 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (grasshopper par)

RTECS®- Ontogenez (Moscow) 1991 ETHANOL reproductive - Female fertility index (rat TDLo)

reproductive - Post-implantation mortality (rat TDLo)

reproductive - Pre-implantation mortality (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- OSHA PEL (Construc): 29,1926 1994 ETHANOL occupationally related - OSHA PEL (Construc) (human TWA)

RTECS®- OSHA PEL (Fed Cont): 41,50-204 1994 ETHANOL occupationally related - OSHA PEL (Fed Cont) (human TWA)

RTECS®- OSHA PEL (Gen Indu): 29,1910 1994 ETHANOL occupationally related - OSHA PEL (Gen Indu) (human TWA)

RTECS®- OSHA PEL (Shipyard): 29,1915 1993 ETHANOL occupationally related - OSHA PEL (Shipyard) (human TWA)

RTECS®- Pharmacology, Biochemistry and Behavior 1998 ETHANOL reproductive - Biochemical and metabolic (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Physiological Psychology 1979 ETHANOL reproductive - Fetotoxicity (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 1982 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: DNA Inhibition ( human lym)

RTECS®- Research Communications in Psychology, Psychiatry and Behavior 1977 ETHANOL reproductive - Biochemical and metabolic (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Teratology, The International Journal of Abnormal Development 1981 ETHANOL developmental - Behavioral (rat TDLo)

reproductive - Parturition (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Teratology, The International Journal of Abnormal Development 1981 ETHANOL reproductive - Central nervous system (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Toxicology Letters 1982 ETHANOL biochemical - Hepatic microsomal mixed oxidase (dealkylation, hydroxylation, etc.) (rat TDLo)

RTECS®- Toxicology 2004 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Micronucleus test ( human lvr)

RTECS®- Tsitologiya i Genetika 1980 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis (rat orl)

RTECS®- Tsitologiya 1978 ETHANOL mutagenic - Positive mutation assay: Cytogenetic Analysis ( human leu)

RTECS®- Union Carbide Data Sheet 1970 ETHANOL skin - Primary skin irritant (rabbit )

RTECS®- Zeitschrift fuer Immunitaetsforschung und Experimentelle Therapie 1928 ETHANOL cancer - gastrointestinal tumor formations - equivocal (mouse TDLo)

mutagenic - liver tumor formations - equivocal (mouse TDLo)

REFERENCES

government/industry list/academic study reference

European Union - Classification & Labelling ECB (European Chemicals Bureau). 2006. Classification and Labelling: Chemicals: Annex I of Directive 67/548/EEC.

FDA Food Additive Status FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration) 2006. Food Additive Status List. Downloaded from http://www.cfsan.fda.gov/%7Edms/opa-appa.html, Oct 16, 2006.

Assoc of Occupational and Environmental Clinics - Asthmagens AOEC (Association of Occupational and Environmental Clinics). 2006. Asthmagen compilation - AEOC exposures codes.

FDA Everything Added to Food FDA (U.S. Food and Drug Administration). 2006. EAFUS [Everything Added to Food]: A Food Additive Database. FDA Office of Food Safety and Applied Nutrition.

National Library of Medicine HazMap NLM (National Library of Medicine). 2006. HazMap ” Occupational Exposure to Hazardous Agents.

Open scientific literature Mutalik S, Udupa N. "Effect of some penetration enhancers on the permeation of glibenclamide and glipizide through mouse skin." Pharmazie. 2003 Dec;58(12):891-4. ; Brand RM, Jendrzejewski JL, Henery EM, Charron AR. A single oral dose of ethanol can alter transdermal absorption of topically applied chemicals in rats. Toxicol Sci. 2006 Aug;92(2):349-55. Epub 2006 May 5.

Scorecard.org Toxicity Information Frazier , L. and M. L. Hage (eds.). Reproductive Hazards of the Workplace, Wiley Europe, 1998. Table 10 (Partial List of Reproductive Toxicants) available at http://www.pharmacy.ohio-state.edu/homepag...table_repro.pdf.

Scorecard.org Toxicity Information Harvell, J., M. Bason and H. Maibach. Contact Urticaria and its Mechanisms. Food Chemistry and Toxicology 32(2): 103-112. 1994. (Table 2: Substances identified as capable of causing contact urticaria).

Scorecard.org Toxicity Information A Relational Database of Hazardous Chemicals and Occupational Diseases. Browse Haz-Map by Adverse Effects http://hazmap.nlm.nih.gov/hazmapadv.html; National Toxicology Program. 10th Report on Carcinogens (2002). http://ehis.niehs.nih.gov/roc/toc10.html

Scorecard.org Toxicity Information Jankovic, J. A Screening Method for Occupational Reproductive Health Risk. American Industrial Hygiene Association Journal. 57: 641-649. 1996.

Scorecard.org Toxicity Information Klaassen, C., M. Amdur and J. Doull (eds.). Casarett and Doull's Toxicology. The Basic Science of Poisons, 5th Ed. Pergamon Press, NY. 1996.; Zimmerman, H.J. and J.H. Lewis. Chemical- and Toxin-Induced Hepatotoxicity. Gastroenterology Clinics of North America. 24(4): 1027-1045. 1995. (Table 3: Forms of environmental hepatic injury).

RTECS®- TLV/BEI,2005 RTECS®- TLV/BEI,2005

RTECS®- TLV/BEI,2006 RTECS®- TLV/BEI,2006

RTECS®- "Prehled Prumyslove Toxikologie; Organicke Latky," Marhold, J 1986 RTECS®- "Prehled Prumyslove Toxikologie; Organicke Latky," Marhold, J., Prague, Czechoslovakia, Avicenum, 1986 -,189,1986

RTECS®- Acta Cytologica 1972 RTECS®- Acta Cytologica. (Science Printers and Pub., Inc., 2 Jacklynn Ct., St. Louis, MO 63132) V.1- -1957 16,41,1972

RTECS®- Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica 1976 RTECS®- Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica. (Copenhagen, Denmark) V.1-59, 1945-86. For publisher information, see PHTOEH 38,260,1976

RTECS®- Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica 1981 RTECS®- Acta Pharmacologica et Toxicologica. (Copenhagen, Denmark) V.1-59, 1945-86. For publisher information, see PHTOEH 49,125,1981

RTECS®- Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology 1977 RTECS®- Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology. (Plenum Pub. Corp., 233 Spring St., New York, NY 10013) V.1- 1967- 85A,25,1977

RTECS®- American Journal of Diseases of Children 1975 RTECS®- American Journal of Diseases of Children. (AMA, 535 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60610) V.1-80(3), 1911-50; V.100- 1960- 129,1075,1975

RTECS®- American Journal of Diseases of Children 1980 RTECS®- American Journal of Diseases of Children. (AMA, 535 N. Dearborn St., Chicago, IL 60610) V.1-80(3), 1911-50; V.100- 1960- 134,419,1980

RTECS®- American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology 1983 RTECS®- American Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology. (C.V. Mosby Co., 11830 Westline Industrial Dr., St. Louis, MO 63146) V.1- 1920- 145,251,1983

RTECS®- American Journal of Ophthalmology 1946 RTECS®- American Journal of Ophthalmology. (Ophthalmic Pub. Co., 435 N. Michigan Ave., Suite 1415, Chicago, IL 60611) Series 3: V.1- 1918- 29,1363,1946

RTECS®- Biologisches Zentralblatt 1987 RTECS®- Biologisches Zentralblatt. (VEB Georg Thieme, Postfach 946, Leipzig DDR-7010, Ger. Dem. Rep.) V.1- 1881- 106,169,1987

RTECS®- Cancer Letters (Shannon, Ireland) 1981 RTECS®- Cancer Letters (Shannon, Ireland). (Elsevier Scientific Pub. Ireland Ltd., POB 85, Limerick, Ireland) V.1- 1975- 13,345,1981

RTECS®- Cytobios 1988 RTECS®- Cytobios. (Faculty Press, 88 Regent St., Cambridge, UK) V.1- 1969- 56,195,1988

RTECS®- Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics 1980 RTECS®- Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics. (S. Karger Pub., Inc., 79 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10003) V.12- 1973- 27,66,1980

RTECS®- Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics 1987 RTECS®- Cytogenetics and Cell Genetics. (S. Karger Pub., Inc., 79 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10003) V.12- 1973- 44,7,1987

RTECS®- Cytology and Genetics (English Translation) 1981 RTECS®- Cytology and Genetics (English Translation). Translation of TGANAK. (Allerton Press Inc., 150 Fifth Ave., New York, NY 10011) V.8- 1974- 15(2),23,1981

RTECS®- Digestive Diseases and Sciences 1980 RTECS®- Digestive Diseases and Sciences. (Plenum Pub. Corp., 233 Spring St., New York, NY 10013) V.24- 1979- 25,587,1980

RTECS®- EHP, Environmental Health Perspectives 1979 RTECS®- EHP, Environmental Health Perspectives. (U.S. Government Printing Office, Supt of Documents, Washington, DC 20402) No.1- 1972- 31,81,1979

RTECS®- Eisei Shikenjo Hokoku 1985 RTECS®- Eisei Shikenjo Hokoku. Bulletin of the Institute of Hygienic Sciences. (Kokuritsu Eisei Shikenjo Kagaku, 18-1 Bushitsu Johobu, Setagaya-ku, Tokyo 158, Japan) V.1- 1886- (103),10,1985

RTECS®- Environmental Mutagenesis 1986 RTECS®- Environmental Mutagenesis. (New York, NY) V.1-9, 1979-87. For publisher information, see EMMUEG. 8(Suppl 6),72,1986

RTECS®- Environmental Research 1990 RTECS®- Environmental Research. (Academic Press, Inc., 1 E. First St., Duluth, MN 55802) V.1- -1967 52,225,1990

RTECS®- Food and Chemical Toxicology 1982 RTECS®- Food and Chemical Toxicology. (Pergamon Press Inc., Maxwell House, Fairview Park, Elmsford, NY 10523) V.20- 1982- 20,573,1982

RTECS®- Genetika (Moscow) 1979 RTECS®- Genetika (Moscow). For English translation, see SOGEBZ. (V/O Mezhdunarodnaya Kniga, 113095 Moscow, USSR) No.1- 1965- 15,927,1979

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My doctor is not the only one who says its harmful to use a product that is more than 50% Ethanol (along with toxic colored dyes).

Oh, and if your derm is the one who told you this product contains 50% ethanol ...... time to get a new derm.

Santa Claus would be preferable.

And Dave, you can copy and paste all you want. You haven't yet posted a single bit of information relevant to the specific topic at hand: whether a tiny amount of topical ethanol at low concentration is toxic.

I know perfectly well that if I rub 100% ethanol on my skin it will cause drying and irritation. I also know that if I drink too much of it, it will kill me. I don't need pages and pages of studies to confirm any of that.

Finally .... I suggest that you not succumb to the temptation of slinging personal insults in lieu of making an intelligent rebuttal or responding to my specific questions. It's against board rules. Consider this a friendly warning. :)

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For anyone who may have lingering concerns about the so-called dangers of ethanol in Green Cream, I just thought I'd post a few thoughts on the enormous importance of concentration and quantity when assessing product ingredients.

Let's take salicylic acid as an example.

In the appropriate concentration, topical salicylic acid is an excellent exfoliant and acne treatment. Leave-on topical SA products range from 1% concentration (mild) to 5% (quite strong).

SA peels can be considerably stronger, of course, since you neutralize them after a few minutes. But if you just left them on your face, they'd burn your skin terribly. Imagine what a 100% SA solution would do to you in just a few seconds .... trust me, the dryness and irritation caused by 100% topical ethanol is NOTHING in comparison.

When ingested, SA is extremely toxic. More toxic than ethanol, as a matter of fact. But again, in tiny quantities, it can be helpful .... aspirin is a salicylate, after all.

Now, I am quite sure there are zillions of studies out there on the horrendous effects of ingesting a large amount of salicylic acid or using a 100% SA solution on your skin.

But do any of those studies actually apply to someone using, say, Paula Begoun's 2% BHA product? Should we all freak out and stop using SA entirely?

Hell, no. Just use a little common sense. And don't eat it. :angel:

If you don't like my SA analogy .... just look at retinoids. Ever wonder why they are present in such incredibly low concentrations ... .1%, .3%, .5%, etc? Because at higher levels, they'd make your skin fall apart. And, remember, retinoids are Vitamin A derivatives. I am sure you are all aware of the risks of Vitamin A poisoning if you take too much of that stuff orally.

There are plenty of studies on these dangers as well. So, according to DaveT's reasoning, none of us should be using retinoids at all.

I hope I've made my point. But I could go on. :D

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You could go on and on and on, but it will only be from a biased and uniformed point of view.

Your refusal to even read any of those studies ON SKIN CONTACT clearly shows that you only care about trying to prove Green Cream ingredients are safe and NOT to inform people that MANY studies show they are toxic to the SKIN, and not just when taken internally. Also, the colored dye used in this product is toxic as well, but I know you don't care about that because you love the product.

Some people would love DRAIN CLEANER if it cleared up their skin, so nothing I say will convince you to change your product, my point was only that there are other, less toxic and irritating products available and these type of products are better for your skin LONG TERM, no matter what you try to tell us, or what the Green Cream SALES MANAGER tries to spin to us.

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Okay, Dave.

You show me which of those studies actually indicate that tiny amounts of ethanol at approximately 5% concentration are toxic to the skin .... and I will not only read them end to end, I will post every bit of the relevant information here.

While you are at it, kindly provide proof that the colored dye is toxic at the minute levels at which it is present in the product.

You really, really don't get the importance of concentration, do you? That entire concept just flew right over your head? :confused:

Clearly you haven't read any of those studies yourself .... I feel pretty sure that if you had, you'd have quoted the information here. Allow me to point out once again that copy/pasting endless lists of irrelevant information does not prove your point. If you really care about trying to convince others, how about coming through with some specific information to back up your wild claims? Because I seriously doubt that many people will want to plow through that list you pasted in here.

Until you provide detailed evidence of your claims regarding ethanol, I regret to inform you that the "biased and uninformed" label is up for grabs ... and so far, you're in the lead. You, after all, are the one who declared -- with absolute certainty, zero evidence, and total incorrectness -- that Green Cream contains more than 50% ethanol. So I really see no reason to believe anything else you say until you prove otherwise.

Personally, I am not really trying to prove anything. As you have said, I like GC and I intend to keep using it; what other people do is up to them. However, I fully intend to continue pointing out the many, many flaws in your logic and in the "evidence" you have presented so far, simply because I dislike misinformation and sloppy thinking.

The readers of this thread can make up their own minds what products to buy. That's not up to me. Or you.

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So I posted awhile ago about using scar zone and gc at the same time. Didn't get a reply. Anyways I was also just wondering if its normal to be breaking out a little while using gc. I had a pretty big breakout which slowly got better just before I got gc. Then after I got it I continued to see some pretty good results but I just started to break out recently again. So is that normal? Btw I use clean and clear continuous acne cleanser during the mid day not sure if that changes anything but I did read from this forum that the two would cancel each other out.

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a few questions before I try to answer yours:

1) what is "scar zone" and what's in it? never heard of it.

2) what is the active ingredient in that cleanser? can't understand why it would "cancel" GC out.

3) how long have you been using GC regularly, and at what strength(s)?

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Oh right sorry about that. Uhmmm scarzone is a cream thats supposed to eliminate scars. Ingredients are..octinoxate 7.5% sunscreen, zinc oxide 3% and sunscreen. BP is the active ingredient and I think I remember someone saying in this topic that BP and retinol a cancel each other out or something like that.Ive been using GC for about a month now at lvl 6.

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Okay, here's the scoop:

1) Yes, BP does neutralize retinol if they're on your skin at the same time. BP works by oxygenating your skin; bacteria don't like an aerobic environment. But oxygen neutralizes retinol. If you use Scar Zone in the mornings and Green Cream at night (after washing your face) there is no conflict between the two products. Be careful about your skin getting overly dry, however ..... that would be my main concern with BP.

2) After a month on Level 6 -- yes, it is totally normal to be seeing some breakouts, and this could go on for another month or so. GC works, like any retinoid, by pushing everything that's clogging your pores up to the surface to get rid of it. I was almost completely clear after 8 weeks, and really really truly clear after 12.

If you feel that your skin is fully accustomed to Level 6, consider switching to Level 9. It is quite a bit stronger, so you will want to ease into it.

Hope that helps!

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i've used mama lotion, and it was wayyyyy to harsh on my skin, and am scared that green cream will mess with my skin. Has anyone ever tried both and had a better reaction with green cream?

im scared, please give me some advice!!!

thanks

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Safe to use while of Accutane?

Unless you are on an extremely low dose ..... no. Wait until the end of your course. Green Cream is a good way to maintain the skin post-Accutane.

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i've used mama lotion, and it was wayyyyy to harsh on my skin, and am scared that green cream will mess with my skin. Has anyone ever tried both and had a better reaction with green cream?

im scared, please give me some advice!!!

thanks

They are extremely different products.

MaMa is an AHA lotion (10% mandelic acid, 10% malic). It is primarily intended to exfoliate the skin. You may have tried to use too much too quickly .... it's a strong product and you should ease into it.

Green Cream is a retinoid. Retinoids actually transform the way your skin cells function; they regenerate faster, pushing comedones (pore blockages) to the surface. Retinoids make your skin more fragile and more sun-sensitive; they also make the skin cells less "sticky", so you get a lot of peeling at first.

If you have sensitive skin, you can begin with GC Level 3. People with normal skin can usually begin with Level 6. Here's a suggested schedule for getting your skin used to it:

Week 1: Once every 3 days.

Week 2: Once every 2 days.

Week 3: 2 out of 3 days.

Week 4: daily

If at any time your skin becomes red, sore, or insanely peely -- quit using GC until things go back to normal. Then pick up the schedule where you left off. It's never a good idea to over-irritate your skin.

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Thanks for your reply, another question. You said i your reply that it makes the skin more fragile.....I've had lots of chemical peels and treatments done, now my skin on my forehead is very thin, fragile, sensitive, and a bit wrinkly. It doesn't quite look like a normal 25 yr old skin. do you think that the green cream will help or could potentialy make it worse?

I ordered the level 3, and it's on it's way.

Once again, thank you for the reply, i am excited to try it and will definitly keep you posted on my progress.

WISH ME LUCK!!!!!!!! :D

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