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That iron age body

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One of those iron age men found in an Irish peat bog recently had both wheat and milk in his stomach.

Which is interesting in the light of the way people keep on claiming that we should avoid these cos they aren't 'the food of our ancestors' etc.

Just a thought.

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Guest Gentle~Rain

:think:

I think one could argue that unless you have a cow in your back yard and grow your own organic ,chemically ,nutrient rich soil- fed wheat ( almost impossible today) that one might be better to stay away from them. Iron age is still modern man, right? I'm gonna bet his milk and wheat were a far site better than ours today. If we go back earlier...I guess people ate what was available in their area....people of the plains, I'm sure ate many types of grains, natural, whole ,real non -chemically processed grains...Milk was most likely drank raw ( much is lost in heat pasteurization. Pasteurization of the milk dramatically changes the fine composition of the raw milk. Warming to 120 degrees Fahrenheit alters this composition that includes various proteins, vitamins, sugars and enzymes. The milk is denaturalized :evil: )

Even milk products were different, butter used to be made from ,matured (fermented) cream -- sour cream.. not fresh "sweet" cream When cream has been properly ripened, it is almost a pure culture of lactic-acid-producing germs, while sweet unpasteurized cream contains a bacterial flora, consisting of many types of desirable and undesirable germs.

Lacto-acid-producing germs -- very helpful for our digestion -- are able to suppress all other unwanted, even pathogenic, germs. Lactic acid fermentation is far superior to the heating of milk (pasteurization) in suppressing pathogenic germs. "sweet cream" butter is churned out to the masses strictly for monetary purposes....it's cheaper and easier...you don't have to waste time for the fermentation process nor do you have to clean your machines between the batches. "sweet cream" butter is a moneymaking monster ;)

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I don't think that milk and wheat are inherently bad, necessarily. But now, most of the milk that is available is altered (pasteurized and homogenized) and things go into that shouldn't (hormones and antibiotics). Most people consume wheat in the form of bread, which is almost always made with rancid oils/trans fats, preservatives, etc. In my opinion, those things are way more of a concern than wheat itself. So the milk and wheat that people consumed a long, long time ago is just not the same as today. To add to that, I'm pretty sure that a long time ago, grains were even sprouted before eaten -- sprouted grains are WAY healthier.

Sprouting, soaking and genuine sourdough leavening "pre-digests" grains, allowing the nutrients to be more easily assimilated and metabolized. This is an age-old approach practiced in most traditional cultures. Sprouting begins germination, which increases the enzymatic activity in foods and inactivates substances called enzyme inhibitors. These enzyme inhibitors prevent the activation of the enzymes present in the food and, therefore, may hinder optimal digestion and absorption. Soaking neutralizes phytic acid, a component of plant fiber found in the bran and hulls of grains, legumes, nuts, and seeds that reduces mineral absorption. All of these benefits may explain why sprouted foods are less likely to produce allergic reactions in those who are sensitive.

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Guest Gentle~Rain

Funny though, you hit the wheat end , I went the milk route :lol2:

:wub:

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I'd also like to add that back then, wheat and milk weren't nearly in every food. Nowadays, anything processed has them.

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One of those iron age men found in an Irish peat bog recently had both wheat and milk in his stomach.

Which is interesting in the light of the way people keep on claiming that we should avoid these cos they aren't 'the food of our ancestors' etc.

Just a thought.

Consider this 5 MILLION years ago our ancestors lived in trees and eat a diet consisting of fruits, vegetables, and insects much like modern tree dwelling monkeys. Then after we became bipedal we evolved into hunter and gatherers and eat plenty of meet. LASTLY after the discovery of fire were we able to cook grains so they were no longer that "toxic" to our bodys and with the ability to cook came the building of civilization and domestication of animals. SOOO The iron man is about 3000 years old and had access to fire and grains. That still leaves 4,997,000 + years where we DIDn't eat grains or cows milk. I don't know WHEN we started eating grains but i know it is recent compared to the ENTIRE history of the human species.

here some sites for why i believe this

http://www.mercola.com/article/insulin.htm

http://www.earth360.com/diet_paleodiet_balzer.html

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I don't think a species would continue to survive without evolving for more that 3,000 years if it was eating something poisonous to it. Unfortunately it didn't say whether this iron age man showed signs of acne tho!

But frankly all the clear-skinned ppl i know eat wheat. I was clear-skinned till age 12 tho i ate wheat since i was born. So i don't think it's a major factor.

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But frankly all the clear-skinned ppl i know eat wheat. I was clear-skinned till age 12 tho i ate wheat since i was born. So i don't think it's a major factor.

That's not logical. Almost no one gets acne before puberty, so there's obviously something that happens at puberty that causes acne in some people -- something to do with hormones. Without that factor, no one would get acne no matter what they ate. That doesn't mean that diet can't ALSO be a factor -- that just isn't logical.

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And trans fats are bad because they clog up the liver... is that the theory? So would eating pasta be better than eating bread because although it contains wheat, there are no preservatives, fats, etc. in it?

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And trans fats are bad because they clog up the liver... is that the theory?

More like a fact.

So would eating pasta be better than eating bread because although it contains wheat, there are no preservatives, fats, etc. in it?

Yup, but I'd avoid wheat for the time being... just because so many people these days have problems with it. Brown rice or Quinoa pasta would be good choices (I always go for the non-gluten alternative grains).

Here's a great article on wheat:

Wheat: A Problem Food for Every Body

By Kelly Hayford, C.N.C., Copyright © 2005

Wheat is one of the most common food allergens that has long been associated with a host of symptoms. Regardless of whether or not you have a known or suspected allergy, sensitivity, or intolerance to wheat, it is wise for everyone to limit or avoid this staple grain altogether for several reasons.

1 ~ We eat way too much wheat in this country. For many it is the only grain they ever eat. This is problematic because it means missing out on the many nutrients that other grains have to offer. In addition, eating the same foods over and over can tax the system, deplete specific enzymes, and lead to intolerances down the road.

2 ~ Unless you are the rare person who cooks up bowls of wheat berries, which is its whole grain form, all of the wheat being served up in this country is processed – the overwhelming majority of which, is highly processed into white refined flour.

White refined flour and the many products made from it - pasta, breads, cereals, pastries, cookies and more - are devoid of most vital nutrients and fiber. These foods are so devitalized they are actually anti-nutrients that deplete the body of vitamins, minerals, and enzymes in order to process them.

Unfortunately, even many of the products labeled “whole wheat� are themselves highly processed, and also frequently contain white refined flour and refined sugars as well. Check the label!

3 ~ Wheat in any form, processed or not, is challenging to digest and eliminate due to its high gluten content. Remember as a child mixing flour and water to make glue? It is gluten that gave this mixture its sticky, glue-like consistency.

Gluten is a mixture of gum-like, water-insoluble plant proteins found in many grains, and wheat has the highest gluten content of them all. Great stuff for binding paper maché, not so good for the intestines – or any other part of the digestive and eliminative tract, for that matter.

4 ~ Because it is so difficult to digest and eliminate, wheat is a notorious mucous-producer and inflammatory agent known to cause or contribute to a host of dis-eases, including: arthritis, sinus problems, constipation, diarrhea, bowel disorders, fatigue, yeast infections, liver & gallbladder congestion, mental disorders, insomnia, and suppressed immune function. In Chinese medicine wheat is considered one of the primary causes of depression.

Regardless of whether or not you are suffering from these or any other symptoms, everyone can benefit from limiting wheat in their diet or going completely wheat-free. Try it and see!

Today it is easier than ever before to go wheat-free or at least cut down on your intake. There is an array of wheat-free and gluten-free products now available on the market. Choose from:

GLUTEN GRAINS:

barley

kamut

oats

rye

spelt

teff

NON-GLUTEN GRAINS:

amaranth

buckwheat

corn

millet

quinoa

rice - wild, brown, basmati, jasmine, etc.

sorghum

When you enjoy these whole grain alternatives, you will not only be giving your system a break from wheat and white refined flour, but you will also be giving your body more of the beneficial nutrients and fiber it so desperately needs.

All-in-all, losing some of the wheat can mean regaining some of your health & energy!

SOME FAVORITE WHEAT-FREE PRODUCTS

- Bob's Red Mill Gluten-Free Pancake Mix

- Bob's Red Mill 8-Grain Wheatless Cereal

- Ryvita or Wasa Rye Crackers/Flat Bread

- Vita Spelt Pasta Products

- Tinkyada Rice Pasta Products

- Thai Kitchen Rice Noodle Soup & Other Dishes

http://curezone.com/forums/m.asp?f=688&i=15

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Blood Type O ('The Hunter') Diet:

(as written by Dr. Peter J. D'Adamo)

..The digestive tracts of all Type Os retain the memory of ancient times. The high-protein hunter-gatherer diet and the enormous physical demands placed on the systems of early Type Os probably kept most primitive humans in a mild state of ketosis--a condition in which the body's metabolism is altered. Ketosis is the result of a high protein, high fat diet that includes very few carbohydrates. The body metabolizes the proteins and fats into ketones, which are used in place of sugars in an attempt to keep glucose levels steady. The combination of ketosis, calorie deprivation, and constant physical exercise made for a lean, mean hunting machine--the key to the survival of the human race.

Dietary recommendations today generally discourage the consumption of too much animal protein because saturated fats have been proven to be a risk factor for heart disease and cancer. Of course, most of the meat consumed today is shot through with fat and tainted by the indiscriminate use of hormones and antibiotics. "You are what you eat" can take on an ominous meaning when you're talking about the modern meat supply.

Fortunately, organic and free-range meats are becoming more widely available. The success of the Type O Diet depends on your use of lean, chemical-free meants, poultry and fish.

TYpe Os don't find dairy products and grains quite as user friendly as do most of the other blood types because their digestive systems still have not adapted to them fully. After all, you don't have to chase down and kill a bowl of wheat or a glass of milk. These foods did not become staples of the human diets until much later in the course of our evolution.

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Interesting. I guess this means it's actually healthier to eat cornflakes than branflakes? And i thought oatbran was supposed to be healthy!

Well i guess the thing to do is to cut down rather than avoid totally. I don't bother with white bread anyway, but surely brown has got some good fiber and stuff in it.

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Interesting. I guess this means it's actually healthier to eat cornflakes than branflakes? And i thought oatbran was supposed to be healthy!

Well i guess the thing to do is to cut down rather than avoid totally. I don't bother with white bread anyway, but surely brown has got some good fiber and stuff in it.

Oats don't contain gluten, but it can still be problematic for some Celiacs (gluten intolerant) due to cross contamination. Myself and others avoided oats on the Gluten-Free diet but after noticing that some others on the GF diet weren't, I added it back in and for the past 6 months or so no problems for me. I do choose whole grain rolled oats though. Also, some celiacs have found that they also have problems with corn (many theories here) and upon elimination their acne disappeared, but so far it's not likely due to the gluten found in corn since it's of a different type.

HTH

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