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~TEPL0~

Acne as a result of high blood sugar

thanks Bryan, have you tried this?

Yes. I took the little plastic measuring cup that comes with a bottle of Pepto-Bismol, and measured out 30 grams of vinegar with a digital scale. I marked a line on the cup with a Sharpie pen right at that point, and now I keep it in the kitchen. It's easy now to pour out and drink that amount of vinegar just prior to a meal high in carbs. I dilute it with water, of course, before drinking it.

Thats about 3T of vinegar right?

It's two tablespoons. Just to be sure, I just now tested it with my own kitchen measuring spoons: I poured two level tablespoons (which are indicated as being 15 mL, BTW) of water into my little measuring cup, and the water level came right to the 30-gram point which I had previously marked.

I've seen variations in measuring spoons, though, so your own mileage may vary!

Bryan

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You don't have to use vinegar, it doesn't always go with what your eating, and drinking it :sick: you can use any type of acid... well maybe not battery acid but you get the point, lemons, limes erm... i can only think of them at the minute look up acidic foods, Another *trick* is cinnamon it has been shown to work like insulin reducing your bodies need for insulin, it also improves insulin sensitivity in erm i think fat cells. Remember these tricks should be just things you know and do now and again they're not substitutes for proper insulin control if you need/want to control your insulin that is.

http://blogs.healthcentral.com/diabetes/david-mendosa

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You don't have to use vinegar, it doesn't always go with what your eating, and drinking it :sick: you can use any type of acid... well maybe not battery acid but you get the point, lemons, limes erm... i can only think of them at the minute look up acidic foods...

I've heard that claim once or twice before on these boards, but I've never seen a reference or citation backing it up. Do you have such a reference?

The authors of that vinegar study I posted imply that it's specifically acetic acid which was doing the trick.

Another *trick* is cinnamon it has been shown to work like insulin reducing your bodies need for insulin, it also improves insulin sensitivity in erm i think fat cells.

I personally know someone, a postmenopausal diabetic woman, who experimented with cinnamon. She tells me that it seemed to work great for a period of time, but eventually stopped working, as if she developed a sort of "tolerance" to it. I wonder if THAT has something to do with the mixed, conflicting cinnamon results from different groups of researchers at that link you posted.

Bryan

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I've heard that claim once or twice before on these boards, but I've never seen a reference or citation backing it up. Do you have such a reference?

mendosa mentions it on his site

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You don't have to use vinegar, it doesn't always go with what your eating, and drinking it :sick: you can use any type of acid... well maybe not battery acid but you get the point, lemons, limes erm... i can only think of them at the minute look up acidic foods...

I've heard that claim once or twice before on these boards, but I've never seen a reference or citation backing it up. Do you have such a reference?

The authors of that vinegar study I posted imply that it's specifically acetic acid which was doing the trick.

Its my understanding that the reason the trick works is because acid slows gastric emptying, although the researchers used acetic acid, its no specific property of acetic acid other than its inherent acidity, therfore limes/lemons with almost the same ph will work just as well. well past my bed time ill have a look tommorow.

Another *trick* is cinnamon it has been shown to work like insulin reducing your bodies need for insulin, it also improves insulin sensitivity in erm i think fat cells.

I personally know someone, a postmenopausal diabetic woman, who experimented with cinnamon. She tells me that it seemed to work great for a period of time, but eventually stopped working, as if she developed a sort of "tolerance" to it. I wonder if THAT has something to do with the mixed, conflicting cinnamon results from different groups of researchers at that link you posted.

Bryan

Yeah i have seen studies were cinnamon works great for a period of time then slowly stops working, but these people have a philosophy completely different to mine i wouldn't suggest using cinnamon as a drug taking acurate doses each day just remember to keep some in your kitchen and use it when appropriate knowing that it's good for you.

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I've heard that claim once or twice before on these boards, but I've never seen a reference or citation backing it up. Do you have such a reference?

mendosa mentions it on his site

Does HE provide a reference or citation?

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Its my understanding that the reason the trick works is because acid slows gastric emptying, although the researchers used acetic acid, its no specific property of acetic acid other than its inherent acidity, therfore limes/lemons with almost the same ph will work just as well.

Nick, did you even bother to READ the study I posted?? The researchers say near the end:

"These data indicate that vinegar can significantly improve postprandrial insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant subjects. Acetic acid has been shown to suppress disaccharidase activity and to raise glucose-6-phosphate concentrations in skeletal muscle; thus, vinegar may possess physiological effects similar to acarbose or metformin."

Yeah i have seen studies were cinnamon works great for a period of time then slowly stops working, but these people have a philosophy completely different to mine i wouldn't suggest using cinnamon as a drug taking acurate doses each day just remember to keep some in your kitchen and use it when appropriate knowing that it's good for you.

Good for you in what way? Because it TASTES GOOD?? :)

If you're not going to use it in doses large enough to have the alleged anti-diabetic effect, then what's the point of bringing it up in the first place, in this context?? :think:

Bryan

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thanks Bryan, have you tried this?

Yes. I took the little plastic measuring cup that comes with a bottle of Pepto-Bismol, and measured out 30 grams of vinegar with a digital scale. I marked a line on the cup with a Sharpie pen right at that point, and now I keep it in the kitchen. It's easy now to pour out and drink that amount of vinegar just prior to a meal high in carbs. I dilute it with water, of course, before drinking it.

Thats about 3T of vinegar right?

It's two tablespoons. Just to be sure, I just now tested it with my own kitchen measuring spoons: I poured two level tablespoons (which are indicated as being 15 mL, BTW) of water into my little measuring cup, and the water level came right to the 30-gram point which I had previously marked.

I've seen variations in measuring spoons, though, so your own mileage may vary!

Bryan

Did it prevent acne, or rise in blood sugar? I have a blood glucose monitor and will try this when I eat something high in glucose. I usually get a rise after eating bad carbs.

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Did it prevent acne, or rise in blood sugar?

You mean on me personally?? I have no idea. I don't have acne in the first place, and I don't monitor my blood sugar. For now, I'm simply trusting the results of that study.

I have a blood glucose monitor and will try this when I eat something high in glucose. I usually get a rise after eating bad carbs.

Cool! Let me know what happens.

Bryan

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Guest WolfPleb
Its my understanding that the reason the trick works is because acid slows gastric emptying, although the researchers used acetic acid, its no specific property of acetic acid other than its inherent acidity, therfore limes/lemons with almost the same ph will work just as well.

Actually acid promotes gastric emptying...

(That's why Champagne makes you drunk quickly- it's acidic from the fruit, it's more acidic still because it's carbonated, its got sugar in it and it's cold- all these things make the valve at the bottom of the stomach open more quickly giving you a rapid hit of alcohol...)

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Its my understanding that the reason the trick works is because acid slows gastric emptying, although the researchers used acetic acid, its no specific property of acetic acid other than its inherent acidity, therfore limes/lemons with almost the same ph will work just as well.

Nick, did you even bother to READ the study I posted?? The researchers say near the end:

"These data indicate that vinegar can significantly improve postprandrial insulin sensitivity in insulin-resistant subjects. Acetic acid has been shown to suppress disaccharidase activity and to raise glucose-6-phosphate concentrations in skeletal muscle; thus, vinegar may possess physiological effects similar to acarbose or metformin."

Ive got a good idea lets give some people acetic acid then measure there blood glucose, oh its lower, must be becuase an in vitro study (The disaccharide one) concluded that the antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid "MAY" be "PARTIALLY" due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity, and rats have raised glucose-6-phosphate levels, its probably nothing to do with the duodenum at all... :rolleyes: why didn't they have controls taking different types acid instead of placebo?

until someone posts a study comparing different types of acid then i'll take their "maybe's" with a pinch of salt.

Yeah i have seen studies were cinnamon works great for a period of time then slowly stops working, but these people have a philosophy completely different to mine i wouldn't suggest using cinnamon as a drug taking acurate doses each day just remember to keep some in your kitchen and use it when appropriate knowing that it's good for you.

Good for you in what way? Because it TASTES GOOD?? :)

If you're not going to use it in doses large enough to have the alleged anti-diabetic effect, then what's the point of bringing it up in the first place, in this context?? :think:

Bryan

There's no minimum ammount any ammount will work the dose being proportional to its effect, if you rely on it constatly it'll stop working so just use it now and again... what's wrong with that?

Its my understanding that the reason the trick works is because acid slows gastric emptying, although the researchers used acetic acid, its no specific property of acetic acid other than its inherent acidity, therfore limes/lemons with almost the same ph will work just as well.

Actually acid promotes gastric emptying...

(That's why Champagne makes you drunk quickly- it's acidic from the fruit, it's more acidic still because it's carbonated, its got sugar in it and it's cold- all these things make the valve at the bottom of the stomach open more quickly giving you a rapid hit of alcohol...)

I think you've been drinking too much champaign, pleb.

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Guest WolfPleb

The body uses the acidity of the food that goes through the pyloric sphincter as an indication of whether the food has been sufficiently processed by the stomach to pass on to the next stage of digestion, if it has been, then the valve opens more or more often, otherwise it tends to shut, and delay the progress of the food.

Unless there's some particular feature of acetic acid, or the way that it is used that would negate that, it would be expected to speed gastric emptying.

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The body uses the acidity of the food that goes through the pyloric sphincter as an indication of whether the food has been sufficiently processed by the stomach to pass on to the next stage of digestion, if it has been, then the valve opens more or more often, otherwise it tends to shut, and delay the progress of the food.

Unless there's some particular feature of acetic acid, or the way that it is used that would negate that, it would be expected to speed gastric emptying.

The body uses the acidity of the food that goes through the pyloric sphincter into the small intestine as an indication of how much more to release, the more acidic the food the LESS is allowed through, its called duodenal gastric feedback. Its the main regulatory system of gastric emptying.

http://www.lib.mcg.edu/edu/eshuphysio/prog...h3/s6ch3_26.htm

I'm tired of this, i post one little sentance then have to spend ages proving it, for what??!?!?! every single time i post someone comes along and disputes it, i think its time to call it a day on here. toodel pip

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The body uses the acidity of the food that goes through the pyloric sphincter as an indication of whether the food has been sufficiently processed by the stomach to pass on to the next stage of digestion, if it has been, then the valve opens more or more often, otherwise it tends to shut, and delay the progress of the food.

Unless there's some particular feature of acetic acid, or the way that it is used that would negate that, it would be expected to speed gastric emptying.

The body uses the acidity of the food that goes through the pyloric sphincter into the small intestine as an indication of how much more to release, the more acidic the food the LESS is allowed through, its called duodenal gastric feedback. Its the main regulatory system of gastric emptying.

http://www.lib.mcg.edu/edu/eshuphysio/prog...h3/s6ch3_26.htm

I'm tired of this, i post one little sentance then have to spend ages proving it, for what??!?!?! every single time i post someone comes along and disputes it, i think its time to call it a day on here. toodel pip

I guess, but you were saying something unproven. Vinegar was used and studied so its effects are known. In theory, limes/lemons could work but we don;t know. Why risk it? If someone wanted to try the "vinegar trick", why try and use limes and lemons when it hasn't been tested? Just post a link to an article or research or something and the argument would have ended. Ages would be unnecessary.

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I guess, but you were saying something unproven. Vinegar was used and studied so its effects are known. In theory, limes/lemons could work but we don;t know. Why risk it? If someone wanted to try the "vinegar trick", why try and use limes and lemons when it hasn't been tested? Just post a link to an article or research or something and the argument would have ended. Ages would be unnecessary.

uhmm.. there's like fifteen threads within this forum regarding lemon juice and it's helpful effects on acne. several people have posted included myself that have specifically tried it themselves and found results.. why not try a completely CRAZY idea: test something yourself. if it works for you - then perhaps, just maybe, you could conclude that it DOES WORK FOR YOU!! :D

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Ive got a good idea lets give some people acetic acid then measure there blood glucose, oh its lower, must be becuase an in vitro study (The disaccharide one) concluded that the antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid "MAY" be "PARTIALLY" due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity, and rats have raised glucose-6-phosphate levels, its probably nothing to do with the duodenum at all... :rolleyes: why didn't they have controls taking different types acid instead of placebo?

until someone posts a study comparing different types of acid then i'll take their "maybe's" with a pinch of salt.

I'm sure the feeling of those researchers is mutual: until someone posts such a study, they'll take YOUR "maybe" about other acids having a similar effect as vinegar with a pinch of salt, too.

If you're not going to use it in doses large enough to have the alleged anti-diabetic effect, then what's the point of bringing it up in the first place, in this context?? :think:

There's no minimum ammount any ammount will work the dose being proportional to its effect, if you rely on it constatly it'll stop working so just use it now and again... what's wrong with that?

You implied using just a tad as a condiment on food, or something. That's not going to be any great shakes for diabetics. While it may or may not be true that only intermittent use of more significant doses confers a modest benefit to diabetics, that's something we need to establish in no uncertain terms, not just speculate about.

I'm tired of this, i post one little sentance then have to spend ages proving it, for what??!?!?! every single time i post someone comes along and disputes it, i think its time to call it a day on here. toodel pip

OH THE HORROR!!! Somebody dared to challenge you on a technical issue! The NERVE of that person!

Take a Valium and relax, Nick. That's the way it works on discussion forums like this.

Bryan

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OH THE HORROR!!! Somebody dared to challenge you on a technical issue! The NERVE of that person!

Take a Valium and relax, Nick. That's the way it works on discussion forums like this.

Bryan

Bryan,

No, I'm afraid that's not how it works around here.

You don't get to attack the credibility of what other members say and then tell them to take a valium. That's not very nice... it's passive-aggressive. It also guarantees that even if you have a point, no one will ever listen to it. Is that really what you want?

Instead of spending so much time trying to convince others that they are wrong, how about putting that time to productive use? Maybe consider the following saying which I believe, is from Confucius.

Do not worry about the snow on your neighbor's roof when your own doorstep is unclean :)

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Bryan,

No, I'm afraid that's not how it works around here.

You don't get to attack the credibility of what other members say and then tell them to take a valium. That's not very nice... it's passive-aggressive. It also guarantees that even if you have a point, no one will ever listen to it. Is that really what you want?

Listen to me very carefully, Jess: I didn't attack anybody's credibility, and neither did anybody else. Another poster challenged Nick on a technical issue, and Nick didn't like that. Maybe he _does_ need to take a Valium! ;)

Bryan

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Ive got a good idea lets give some people acetic acid then measure there blood glucose, oh its lower, must be becuase an in vitro study (The disaccharide one) concluded that the antihyperglycemic effect of acetic acid "MAY" be "PARTIALLY" due to the suppression of disaccharidase activity, and rats have raised glucose-6-phosphate levels, its probably nothing to do with the duodenum at all... :rolleyes: why didn't they have controls taking different types acid instead of placebo?

until someone posts a study comparing different types of acid then i'll take their "maybe's" with a pinch of salt.

I'm sure the feeling of those researchers is mutual: until someone posts such a study, they'll take YOUR "maybe" about other acids having a similar effect as vinegar with a pinch of salt, too.

Its NOT a maybe though is it... acid's reduce gastic emptying its as simple as that, gillian mckeith agrees with me, mendosa argrees with me the medical college of georgia agree, Liljeberg (no idea who she is) agrees with me... its not even a theory its just a fact. "maybe" vinegar has additional benefits but no-one has posted anything (other than a maybe and a very poor one at that) confirming this so were still at a point were the only conclusion to be made is the inherent benefits of ANY acid. Aren't you the one who goes on about precision? maybe's aren't precise.

If you're not going to use it in doses large enough to have the alleged anti-diabetic effect, then what's the point of bringing it up in the first place, in this context?? :think:

There's no minimum ammount any ammount will work the dose being proportional to its effect, if you rely on it constatly it'll stop working so just use it now and again... what's wrong with that?

You implied using just a tad as a condiment on food, or something. That's not going to be any great shakes for diabetics. While it may or may not be true that only intermittent use of more significant doses confers a modest benefit to diabetics, that's something we need to establish in no uncertain terms, not just speculate about.

i didn't imply, YOU infered it, i personally put loads in a meal i make that i have now and then, i also clearly stated that it should not be relied upon its just a little boost, like a hug wont cure deperession but its nice to have one once in a while. if you think cinnamon/lemons will cure acne/diabetes then your mistaken, they're hugs nothing more.

I'm tired of this, i post one little sentance then have to spend ages proving it, for what??!?!?! every single time i post someone comes along and disputes it, i think its time to call it a day on here. toodel pip

OH THE HORROR!!! Somebody dared to challenge you on a technical issue! The NERVE of that person!

Take a Valium and relax, Nick. That's the way it works on discussion forums like this.

Bryan

Im not *horrified* that someone challenged me im just *TIRED* of debating things that have no benefit to myself, lemons work i know this, ive gone hypo with them a few times, but this isn't the point, i only wanted to offer my advice i didn't want to then have to provide lots of information to back it up this is whats TIRING, i dont mind posting a quick 2min message but i get TIRED at spending a long time proving lemons work. subsequently as i cannot post information without it being disputed and having to back it up i decided to no longer post, im not having a hissy fit and im not horrified i just feel my time could be spent more productively elsewhere, ive been on here for a few hours now and if debating lemons/cinnamon on an acne forum is the highlight of my day i really need to get out more.

Listen to me very carefully, Jess: I didn't attack anybody's credibility, and neither did anybody else. Another poster challenged Nick on a technical issue, and Nick didn't like that. Maybe he _does_ need to take a Valium! wink.gif

why don't you listen to me very carefully... its not that i didnt like it, it's everyone right to challenge anyone, it's also my right to grow tired of being challenged there's a whole world out there i haven't seen today, because i posted a two minute message that turned into a day-long debate.

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I'm starting to think that it's not the glucose that jumps too high, but something beyond that. When I measured my glucose after a high-sugar meal, it went up and down the way it's supposed to - normally.

So it's something after that (the insulin response perhaps) which is not normal, and causing the body's over-reaction.

Pehaps it's the candida issue - I heard a doctor speak about it on the radio. Candida can cause a variety of skin problems and allergic reactions, and what feeds candida is CARBS (sugar, bread, rice, etc.)

What kills candida is apple cider vinegar.

Lemon juice might lower your blood sugar, but in my case blood sugar is not the problem, and maybe it's the same in your case (that's why I say you should test your own blood to find out)

lowering your blood sugar is like putting on BP. It temporarily reduces the problem, but the body's bad reaction is still there.

use apple cider vinegar to cleanse your body - not to lower blood glucose.

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Its NOT a maybe though is it... acid's reduce gastic emptying its as simple as that, gillian mckeith agrees with me, mendosa argrees with me the medical college of georgia agree, Liljeberg (no idea who she is) agrees with me... its not even a theory its just a fact.

And this is now my THIRD request for someone to link me to some reference or citation that supports the idea that drinking fruit acids (or whatever) can have any significant effect at slowing the rise of blood glucose. I looked around on Mendosa's site for that when you (or somebody) supplied the link to the cinnamon info, but I didn't see anything about acids in general.

"maybe" vinegar has additional benefits but no-one has posted anything (other than a maybe and a very poor one at that) confirming this so were still at a point were the only conclusion to be made is the inherent benefits of ANY acid. Aren't you the one who goes on about precision? maybe's aren't precise.

I do believe that the vinegar researchers would have made SOME reference to such a possibility if they thought there could be any truth to that idea, but they didn't. I think it was PURE SPECULATION on your part to say that "Its my understanding that the reason the trick works is because acid slows gastric emptying, although the researchers used acetic acid, its no specific property of acetic acid other than its inherent acidity, therfore limes/lemons with almost the same ph will work just as well."

You implied using just a tad as a condiment on food, or something. That's not going to be any great shakes for diabetics. While it may or may not be true that only intermittent use of more significant doses confers a modest benefit to diabetics, that's something we need to establish in no uncertain terms, not just speculate about.

i didn't imply, YOU infered it, i personally put loads in a meal i make that i have now and then...

I think it's a quite reasonable inference that I made, considering that you said: "i wouldn't suggest using cinnamon as a drug taking acurate doses each day just remember to keep some in your kitchen and use it when appropriate knowing that it's good for you." If you really meant to say that you put "loads" of it on a meal, then you should have SAID it.

if you think cinnamon/lemons will cure acne/diabetes then your mistaken, they're hugs nothing more.

Really? Based on WHAT? Have the researchers who actually tested cinnamon stated in those studies that cinnamon should merely be considered a "hug"?

why don't you listen to me very carefully... its not that i didnt like it, it's everyone right to challenge anyone, it's also my right to grow tired of being challenged there's a whole world out there i haven't seen today, because i posted a two minute message that turned into a day-long debate.

I've appreciated the contributions you've made, Nick, and I mean that sincerely. But perhaps participating in a forum like this really ISN'T your cup of tea. It's almost inevitable that you WILL get caught up in disagreements like that from time to time. It benefits us all to get to the bottom of issues like that, but if you don't have the time, you don't have the time...

Bryan

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Im going to take the advise of Ariventa instead of debating the issue (takes a long time) i'll just pass on refrence to other more knowledgable people who support my opinion, after all, all i'm doing is passing on THIER knowledge anyway its not like i did the tests myself or anything is it.

So as for acid's slowing glucose absorbion via delyaed gastric empting:

Mendosa states it numerous times on his website, and makes refrence to Jennie Brand-Miller Professor of Human Nutrition at the University of Sydney (one of the most famous GI researchers in the world) who is also of the same opinion:

http://www.mendosa.com/acidic_foods.htm

http://www.usaweekend.com/99_issues/990905...05eatsmart.html

IMELDA ANGELES-AGDEPPA, PHD

http://www.dost.gov.ph/media/article.php?s...order=0&thold=0

Liljeberg H, Bjorck I. “Delayed gastric emptying rate may explain improved glycaemia in healthy subjects to a starchy meal with added vinegar.� Eur J Clin Nutr. 1998 May;52(5):368-71.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...9&dopt=Abstract

Note its the delayed gastric emptying that has the effect on glucose absorbtion, as highlighted by the reduced rate of acetomorphen absorbtion, not a specific property of vinegar THEREFORE vinegar is interchangeable with other acids... as shown by:

the medical college of georgia:

http://www.lib.mcg.edu/edu/eshuphysio/prog...h3/s6ch3_26.htm

and agreed upon by those individuals above, and a thousand other sources... like i said acid's slowing gastric empting is widely accepted, and you cant very well absorb glucose from your stomach now can you.

Now as i also said earlier MAYBE (a very poor maybe) vinegar has additional benefits, but that is yet to be confirmed. (becuase the studies didn't have proper controls) my position is very well supported, so, as for "PURE SPECULATION" How very dare you... :D (refrence to a UK comedy show)

As for not relying upon vinegar/lemon/cinnamon as cures, you said yourself cinnamon wore off and you can hardly expect to eat mash potato all day and have swig of lemon juice and be allright anyway im not debating, mercola is though he's got an opinion on everything:

Joseph Mercola

http://www.mercola.com/2000/sep/3/cinnamon_insulin.htm

http://www.mercola.com/2005/jan/22/vinegar_diabetes.htm

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Now as i also said earlier MAYBE (a very poor maybe) vinegar has additional benefits, but that is yet to be confirmed. (becuase the studies didn't have proper controls) my position is very well supported, so, as for "PURE SPECULATION" How very dare you... :D (refrence to a UK comedy show)

Thanks for the links, Nick! I'll study them carefully.

BTW, I emailed Carol Johnston (the author of this most recent vinegar study), and asked her for her opinion of what you said. If she replies, I'll post it here.

As for not relying upon vinegar/lemon/cinnamon as cures, you said yourself cinnamon wore off and you can hardly expect to eat mash potato all day and have swig of lemon juice and be allright...

Uh...yeah, that's exactly my point: _I_ was the one who told _you_ about my friend's anecdote. What would you have thought had I not told you about it? ;) As far as I know, the studies that examined the effects of cinnamon on blood glucose didn't find any such effect (an eventual "wearing-off" or a "tolerance" to its effects), so we can't really ASSUME (as you appear to have done) that it must only be used intermittently and irregularly. Whether or not that's actually correct needs to be determined scientifically. I think it's a very URGENT need.

Bryan

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Uh...yeah, that's exactly my point: _I_ was the one who told _you_ about my friend's anecdote. What would you have thought had I not told you about it? ;) As far as I know, the studies that examined the effects of cinnamon on blood glucose didn't find any such effect (an eventual "wearing-off" or a "tolerance" to its effects), so we can't really ASSUME (as you appear to have done) that it must only be used intermittently and irregularly. Whether or not that's actually correct needs to be determined scientifically. I think it's a very URGENT need.

Bryan

i'm not asuming that it will wear off (your anecdote said it might, i believe it might also), i'm saying its a possiblity, and shouldn't be used like a drug or relied upon for several reasons 1) it MIGHT wear off 2) see mercola links above about it not being a cure and 3) as This study: http://care.diabetesjournals.org/cgi/content/full/26/12/3215 indicates, intermitent usage is fine as are moderate ammounts.

"Lower serum glucose and lipid levels were maintained in the cinnamon group 20 days after the end of the study, indicating that cinnamon need not be consumed every day to exert its beneficial effects."

"The levels of cinnamon tested in this study, 1-6 g per day, suggest that there is a wide range of cinnamon intake that may be beneficial and that intake of <1 g daily is likely to be beneficial in controlling blood glucose."

So like i said earlier there's *no need* to take it every day or use it like a drug whether what you/i say about it waring off is true or not, i found refrence to it waring off some time ago but it didn't really matter to me as i wouldn't use it like they did anyway (like i said about having a different philosophy) unfortunately i dont have a link for this.

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I bought a supplement for people with low blood sugar, but I'm baffled because it contains cinnamon.

Still, it definitely says it is for low blood sugar and not diabetes.

It doesn't seem to be making me feel sick when I take it.

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