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I was wondering if anyone has heard of or experienced this? It is something I would like to eventually try at least once and ideally more regularly if it would go well, though I have my uneasiness about how certain treatments would feel but apparently this feeling is very common. Some of the treatments included may seem unfamiliar or even unpleasant to those in the West, but apparently the benefits are truly felt. It is something considered very important in the Ayurvedic practice, and should be assumed by Ayurvedic doctors and those with the proper knowledge.

It is used both to prevent and treat many health concerns, including skin conditions.

The places I have found that offer this are quite expensive, as accomodation and meals are often included due to the fact that the process should last a minimum of five days.

If anyone would like more information, I would be happy to share some from a book I am currently reading.

If anyone happens to have experienced this unique process, I would be very interested in hearing about it.

Thanks. :angel:

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From what I saw it looks like more of the same "invisible energy flow determines health and for so many hundreds of dollars I'll fix yours" crap. This is today's version of the miracle elixir salesman. Ever see "The Outlaw Josey Wales"?

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From what I saw it looks like more of the same "invisible energy flow determines health and for so many hundreds of dollars I'll fix yours" crap. This is today's version of the miracle elixir salesman. Ever see "The Outlaw Josey Wales"?

Can I ask where you read this? The information does not seem quite accurate or sufficient enough to base an understanding of the treatment upon.

I did not see The Outlaw Josey Wales. What is that?

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Thank you for posting the link. It isn't too bad in describing it. I think there may also be even better explanations of its purpose, benefits and treatments.

Keep in mind that Ayurveda was based in India over 3000 years ago. There, its importance is as valued as western medicine. They recognize the advances of science in modern medicine and its practical uses, but this is more in relation to a natural, global approach for both treating and preventing. I just finished reading a book about it

(http://www.amazon.ca/exec/obidos/ASIN/1856264246/qid=1136737351/sr=1-1/ref=sr_1_0_1/702-6763528-5357625)

, and it was very simple, clear and informative. I appreciate modern medicine too, and its discoveries. Some things are truly incredible and helpful, especially in situations of accidents or surgeries or certain tests - and they acknowledge that especially in the first respects, it may be unbeatable due to its technology, etc.. But it may have its limits too.

Not many know about Ayurveda, and yet it maybe be one of if not the most solid health foundations in the natural field. It has a reputation for knowledge and success, and may be a safer alternative to much of what we may believe today, especially in relation to prescription medicines. Apparently, the training process is now quite extensive and comprehensive, and many studies to become an ayurvedic doctor are now as long as medical doctors.

I am still learning about this, but what I really like is how it takes into account a person's individuality and how this is vital to determining proper treatment required, how it considers the mind, body and soul as connected and not seperate, how they address the basics like diet, exercise, sleep and also take into account seasons and times of day and have a strong knowledge of the human functions and ultimately how the focus is balance.

Some aspects I am a little bit less attached to but that is alright.

To many people who are more familiar with modern medicine, it may seem like something not quite as tangible or trustworthy, but again, this particular practice has existed for thousands or years and has built its reputation because it has helped many, especially some who were not able to feel better with common treatment.

Panchakarma is a special detox and cleansing therapy that is viewed as quite significant in the practice.

http://www.chakrapaniayurveda.com/panchakarma.html

A movie with a miracle elixir salesman in it.

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Boiling herbs in water to steam yourself is a waste of money. Unless the herbs have some chemicals that disassociate in heat AND evaporate at a slightly higher point than water or less... then they are there for nothing except maybe to smell nice. Looks to me like all this practice is gonna accomplish is stress relief. Then you see your bank account and the stress comes right back.

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No. Surprisingly maybe, many herbs have healing effects (not only steaming either), and those who are responsible for treatments are quite knowledgeable of them and it is not just something superficial. Also, there is a lot more to Ayurveda than herbs. Panchakarma is a blend of various treatments and they depend on the consultation and concerns.

Yes, I think you're definitely right that it is helpful with stress and also that it is often expensive, but you might have to read about it further to gain a better understanding and appreciation.

I definitely understand how you and others might feel this way though.

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No what I'm saying is that when water evaporates it doesn't take anything with it. That's why we boil water and let the steam condense to remove impurities. So steaming with herb-water is not going to be effective.

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Hi Melek,

I was looking through my book.

In relation to Panchakarma, there are normally two treatments during pre-detoxification and throughout the actual internal cleansing/detox (Panchakarma), there are five steps, one being nasal therapy which involves steam.

Nasya karma (nasal therapy) is used to eliminate unbalanced doshas from the upper body. The patient inhales steam and medicinal vapour made from powdered medicines, dried herbs, medicated oils or the juices of medicinal plants. This therapy is used to treat catarrh, migraine, eye complaints, problems with the nervous system such as stuttering, and stiffness in the head and neck. It also clears congested sinuses, tones the face muscles and alleviates skin problems, loss of memory, paralysis and depression.

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As far as I'm aware, the only medical use that has been proven for aroma-therapy is as a decongestant (vaporub). I'm not saying that aromatherapy is completely useless. But I'd be very surprised if there were anything it can treat that could not be treated vastly more effectively through other means. Smells are basically diffused particles. Not many stable substances will diffuse at a rate that would allow them to actually contribute any medical benefit via inhalation.

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If you still haven't had this done, I'd highly recommend it to you. If nothing else, it's extremely relaxing and therapeutic, gives a glow to the skin and eyes, and a heightened sense of awareness. The Shirodhara especially is intensely relaxing. Please do prepare for the treatment about 4-5 days at home if you can, for a better experience, and you won't regret it.

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If you still haven't had this done, I'd highly recommend it to you. If nothing else, it's extremely relaxing and therapeutic, gives a glow to the skin and eyes, and a heightened sense of awareness. The Shirodhara especially is intensely relaxing. Please do prepare for the treatment about 4-5 days at home if you can, for a better experience, and you won't regret it.

Thank you very much. I haven't done this yet. Different places offering Panchakarma include different treatments. One place, Kripalu, does recommend preparing for it at home, I think, and I believe there are other things recommended after the therapy, upon arrival at home. It feels like it could be a good thing to do before beginning a healthier lifestyle.

Have you done this yourself, and if so, where and what treatments were included and could you share a little bit more about the experience? Thank you. :angel:

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Hi....my 1st post yay

I have been on Ayurveda for 4 months now, used 2 different practioners and got different results. My first experience was with panchkarma therapy and herbs, which I used for one month only, and saw good results. Unfortunately I had to stop using this 1st doctor (Sri Lankan lady) coz she lives far away and I can't get time off work to see her. My current ayurvedic doctor (Indian lady) is giving me herbs only, and some creams, and my acne has gone from mild to severe. Also she is damn more expensive.

So do try panchkarma....it really does help. I'll post some pics later. But do shop around carefully.

I am gonna have serious words with my current doctor and am considering switching to normal meds like roaccutane now......unless i win the lottery and buy a house in london near my old ayurvedic doctor lol

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