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Alright so twice a day I use Clean and Clear Advantage acne cleanser, it has 2% SA. Morning and Night. I also put differin on in the morning and a plexion sct mask at night. Is using C&C Acne Cleanser twice a day to harsh or should I try something else?

The reason Im asking is this, what exactly does SA do? Ive had good results and my skin feels tight and dry after I use the cleanser but it seems like its also making my skin really pale and all the red marks and blemishes on my face are really standing out. Should I try a different cleanser, something less powerful or should I be fine with this.

I rarely have any breakouts, Im just getting over my initial breakout from differin but yeah.

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SA is an exfoliant, but if you're using it as a cleanser then it's probably not doing much since you're washing it off every time you use it anyway.

salicylic acid. Referred to as beta hydroxy acid (BHA), it is a multifunctional ingredient that addresses many of the systemic causes of blemishes (Source: Seminars in Dermatology, December 1990, pages 305–308). For decades dermatologists have been prescribing salicylic acid as an exceedingly effective keratolytic (exfoliant), but it also is an anti-irritant This is because salicylic acid is a derivative of aspirin (both are salicylatesâ€â€aspirin’s technical name is acetyl salicylic acid), and so it also functions as an anti-inflammatory. (Sources: Archives of Internal Medicine, July 2002, pages 1531–1532; Annals of Dermatology and Venereology, January 2002, pages 137–142; Archives of Dermatology, November 2000, pages 1390–1395; and Pain, January 1996, pages 71–82). Another notable aspect of salicylic acid for treating breakouts is that it has antimicrobial properties (Source: Preservatives for Cosmetics, 1996, by David Steinberg, Allured Publishing; and Health Canada Monograph Category IV, Antiseptic Cleansers, at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/). It is also well documented that it can improve skin thickness, barrier functions, and collagen production (Sources: Dermatology, 1999, volume 199, number 1, pages 50–53; and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Volume 175, Issue 1, pages 76–82). As an exfoliant, in concentrations of 8% to 12%, it is effective in wart-remover medications. In concentrations of 0.5% to 2%, it is far more gentle, and, much like AHAs (See AHAs), can exfoliate the surface of skin. In addition, BHA has the ability to penetrate into the pore (AHAs do not), and thus can exfoliate inside the pore as well on the surface of the skin; that makes it effective for reducing blemishes, including blackheads and whiteheads.

salicylic acid. Referred to as beta hydroxy acid (BHA), it is a multifunctional ingredient that addresses many of the systemic causes of blemishes (Source: Seminars in Dermatology, December 1990, pages 305–308). For decades dermatologists have been prescribing salicylic acid as an exceedingly effective keratolytic (exfoliant), but it also is an anti-irritant This is because salicylic acid is a derivative of aspirin (both are salicylatesâ€â€aspirin’s technical name is acetyl salicylic acid), and so it also functions as an anti-inflammatory. (Sources: Archives of Internal Medicine, July 2002, pages 1531–1532; Annals of Dermatology and Venereology, January 2002, pages 137–142; Archives of Dermatology, November 2000, pages 1390–1395; and Pain, January 1996, pages 71–82). Another notable aspect of salicylic acid for treating breakouts is that it has antimicrobial properties (Source: Preservatives for Cosmetics, 1996, by David Steinberg, Allured Publishing; and Health Canada Monograph Category IV, Antiseptic Cleansers, at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/). It is also well documented that it can improve skin thickness, barrier functions, and collagen production (Sources: Dermatology, 1999, volume 199, number 1, pages 50–53; and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Volume 175, Issue 1, pages 76–82). As an exfoliant, in concentrations of 8% to 12%, it is effective in wart-remover medications. In concentrations of 0.5% to 2%, it is far more gentle, and, much like AHAs (See AHAs), can exfoliate the surface of skin. In addition, BHA has the ability to penetrate into the pore (AHAs do not), and thus can exfoliate inside the pore as well on the surface of the skin; that makes it effective for reducing blemishes, including blackheads and whiteheads.

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SA is an exfoliant, but if you're using it as a cleanser then it's probably not doing much since you're washing it off every time you use it anyway.

salicylic acid. Referred to as beta hydroxy acid (BHA), it is a multifunctional ingredient that addresses many of the systemic causes of blemishes (Source: Seminars in Dermatology, December 1990, pages 305–308). For decades dermatologists have been prescribing salicylic acid as an exceedingly effective keratolytic (exfoliant), but it also is an anti-irritant This is because salicylic acid is a derivative of aspirin (both are salicylates—aspirin’s technical name is acetyl salicylic acid), and so it also functions as an anti-inflammatory. (Sources: Archives of Internal Medicine, July 2002, pages 1531–1532; Annals of Dermatology and Venereology, January 2002, pages 137–142; Archives of Dermatology, November 2000, pages 1390–1395; and Pain, January 1996, pages 71–82). Another notable aspect of salicylic acid for treating breakouts is that it has antimicrobial properties (Source: Preservatives for Cosmetics, 1996, by David Steinberg, Allured Publishing; and Health Canada Monograph Category IV, Antiseptic Cleansers, at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/). It is also well documented that it can improve skin thickness, barrier functions, and collagen production (Sources: Dermatology, 1999, volume 199, number 1, pages 50–53; and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Volume 175, Issue 1, pages 76–82). As an exfoliant, in concentrations of 8% to 12%, it is effective in wart-remover medications. In concentrations of 0.5% to 2%, it is far more gentle, and, much like AHAs (See AHAs), can exfoliate the surface of skin. In addition, BHA has the ability to penetrate into the pore (AHAs do not), and thus can exfoliate inside the pore as well on the surface of the skin; that makes it effective for reducing blemishes, including blackheads and whiteheads.

salicylic acid. Referred to as beta hydroxy acid (BHA), it is a multifunctional ingredient that addresses many of the systemic causes of blemishes (Source: Seminars in Dermatology, December 1990, pages 305–308). For decades dermatologists have been prescribing salicylic acid as an exceedingly effective keratolytic (exfoliant), but it also is an anti-irritant This is because salicylic acid is a derivative of aspirin (both are salicylates—aspirin’s technical name is acetyl salicylic acid), and so it also functions as an anti-inflammatory. (Sources: Archives of Internal Medicine, July 2002, pages 1531–1532; Annals of Dermatology and Venereology, January 2002, pages 137–142; Archives of Dermatology, November 2000, pages 1390–1395; and Pain, January 1996, pages 71–82). Another notable aspect of salicylic acid for treating breakouts is that it has antimicrobial properties (Source: Preservatives for Cosmetics, 1996, by David Steinberg, Allured Publishing; and Health Canada Monograph Category IV, Antiseptic Cleansers, at www.hc-sc.gc.ca/english/). It is also well documented that it can improve skin thickness, barrier functions, and collagen production (Sources: Dermatology, 1999, volume 199, number 1, pages 50–53; and Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, Volume 175, Issue 1, pages 76–82). As an exfoliant, in concentrations of 8% to 12%, it is effective in wart-remover medications. In concentrations of 0.5% to 2%, it is far more gentle, and, much like AHAs (See AHAs), can exfoliate the surface of skin. In addition, BHA has the ability to penetrate into the pore (AHAs do not), and thus can exfoliate inside the pore as well on the surface of the skin; that makes it effective for reducing blemishes, including blackheads and whiteheads.

from http://www.cosmeticscop.com/learn/dictiona...YPE=SEARCH&ID=S

Yeah but its a cleanser with 2% SA. It says apply, gently rub in for 30 seconds then rinse. Even if its not doing much is that an appropriate cleanser to use twice a day befor my differin and plexion mask or should I go with something more gentle.

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I would use something more gentle. I'm not sure if you can mix Differin and SA, you would have to check, but if so then a leave-on SA product with a low pH is more appropriate.

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