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I have very oily skin and it terribly annoys me! My pores are huge, I get so many blackheads, and I have very mild acne. I constantly have to wipe away the oil that accumulates on my face, because if I didn't I'd look like a shiny freak! However, despite the annoyances, I'm scared to use any type of acne product that will severely dry out my face. My mother (who also has oily skin) has told me that people with oily faces tend to get less wrinkles and age better than people without oil... and it's definitely true, because my mother, at 51 years old, looks fabulous and has beautiful skin!

Is there any way to strike some sort of healthy balance? I'd like to have a normal, non-oily face, but then again, I don't want to lose the oil because it WILL be beneficial in the long-run.

Does anyone else feel this way/have this problem?

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My mother (who also has oily skin) has told me that people with oily faces tend to get less wrinkles and age better than people without oil...

I've heard that claim a number of times, but I don't know if it's correct. I'm rather dubious about it.

Bryan

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My mother (who also has oily skin) has told me that people with oily faces tend to get less wrinkles and age better than people without oil...

I've heard that claim a number of times, but I don't know if it's correct. I'm rather dubious about it.

Bryan

yeah i personally think it's crap. the only thing that keeps you from looking old is consistent, high SPF sunscreen applications.

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Guest Grow_To_Overthrow

Yeah i don't know that it's true about oiliness and less lines. UVB rays attack pigment altering, UVA rays attack the dermis and cause cellular damage. I don't see how oil would hinder either of these.

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Yeah, I don't believe it. I have always had oily skin, and now at 23 am starting to get lines around my eyes and mouth. I have never used harsh products (aside from 2 months of BP) and always wear sunscreen or makeup with sunscreen in it. So I think its a crock!

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My mother (who also has oily skin) has told me that people with oily faces tend to get less wrinkles and age better than people without oil...

I've heard that claim a number of times, but I don't know if it's correct. I'm rather dubious about it.

Bryan

Actually, in my case it has turned out to be absolutely true. Despite sun damage and over-drying in my teens and 20s, my oily skin now (at age 41) makes me look at least 5 years younger than my girlfriends (whom I used to envy for their dry, apparently effort-free skin). This is not just me bragging, they say the same!

I do have expression lines, but no wrinkles ... and instead of looking oily now, my skin always has a nice glow to it. It does need to be well moisturized, though; if it gets dry, it just looks tight and shiny.

Of course, I've been taking really good care of my skin for the past 10 years or so ... finally wised up around 30 and started exfoliating, moisturizing, wearing a hat, etc.

Q

Yeah, I don't believe it. I have always had oily skin, and now at 23 am starting to get lines around my eyes and mouth. I have never used harsh products (aside from 2 months of BP) and always wear sunscreen or makeup with sunscreen in it. So I think its a crock!

Those are just expression lines ... they're genetic. Eventually everyone gets 'em, oily skin or dry. It's your skin tone that will look better than anyone else's 20 years from now. I hope that is a teensy bit comforting. :)

Q

However, despite the annoyances, I'm scared to use any type of acne product that will severely dry out my face.

You are smart! Over-drying will just make your skin crank up its oil production and exacerbate your problems. If you find a really good light gel moisturizer (I like Murad's) it will actually help your skin become less oily. Taking flax oil or fish oil or EFA capsules and drinking lots of water should help as well.

Q

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You are smart! Over-drying will just make your skin crank up its oil production and exacerbate your problems. If you find a really good light gel moisturizer (I like Murad's) it will actually help your skin become less oily.

There is not one iota of evidence that dry skin will "crank up oil production".

Bryan

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Exactly! Over-drying means you are actually damaging your skin and placing added stress on it. If you are already suffering from acne, you need to be looking at ways to calm your skin down. Adding moisture in a non-greasy, non-comedogenic way can only help.

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Nobody is saying dry skin will crank up oil production. The key word is "over-drying". Not the same as dry skin.

Oh, ok. I'll make a subtle correction to what I said:

Over-drying the skin doesn't "crank up oil production". At least, I don't know of any evidence that it does. Do you?

Bryan

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Nobody is saying dry skin will crank up oil production. The key word is "over-drying". Not the same as dry skin.

Oh, ok. I'll make a subtle correction to what I said:

Over-drying the skin doesn't "crank up oil production". At least, I don't know of any evidence that it does. Do you?

Bryan

yes, its not documented though.

Do you know of any evidence thats not over 20 years old?

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Nobody is saying dry skin will crank up oil production. The key word is "over-drying". Not the same as dry skin.

Oh, ok. I'll make a subtle correction to what I said:

Over-drying the skin doesn't "crank up oil production". At least, I don't know of any evidence that it does. Do you?

Bryan

I said that because that's what my dermatologist told me. However, I don't have it on tape.

Q

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yes, its not documented though.

It never is, is it? :think::)

Do you know of any evidence thats not over 20 years old?

Yes. Here's some:

Journal of Investigative Dermatology. 1987 Mar;88(3 Suppl):2s-6s.

"Skin lipids: an update"

Downing DT, Stewart ME, Wertz PW, Colton SW, Abraham W, Strauss JS.

(excerpt from this study follows below, including the references...)

Sebum and Dry Skin "...skin can be healthy and have charming cosmetic properties in the virtual absence of sebum." (14)

Kligman drew attention to prepubertal children, who produce almost no sebum, to support his thesis that skin does not depend upon sebum for maintaining its barrier to water loss: "...there can be no doubt of the insignificance of sebum as a waterproofing material." (14) Our recent studies at the other end of the human age spectrum have supported this conviction. In a survey of sebum secretion rates and the incidence of dry skin among subjects aged 65 to 97, no correlation was found between sebaceous gland activity and the presence or severity of dry skin (34). Kligman recognized that sebum could mask the scaliness of dry skin without producing any actual change in the condition: "Sebum, like any oil, has some emollient or smoothing effect when a sufficient quantity is rubbed into dry, scaling skin." (14) In spite of the clear inference to be drawn from the cutaneous characteristics of children and the experimental data obtained from the elderly, it remains difficult to dispel the myth that low sebum secretion rates cause dry skin. It is a rare individual who realizes that "dry" is not the obverse of "oily".

(14) Kligman AM: The uses of sebum. Br J Dermatol 75: 307-319, 1963

(34) Frantz RA, Kinney CK, Downing DT: A study of skin dryness in the elderly. Nursing Res 35: 98-100, 1986.

Over-drying the skin doesn't "crank up oil production". At least, I don't know of any evidence that it does. Do you?

I said that because that's what my dermatologist told me. However, I don't have it on tape.

I'll settle for a citation from the medical literature. That's what I wanted, in the first place.

Bryan

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Bryan, could you please indicate _exactly_ which info in that citation contradicts the possibility that normal adult skin which is under stress due to overdrying will attempt to correct itself by overproducing sebum?

Honestly, I'm not trying to be contentious here. I just didn't see anything that clearly contradicted what the derm told me.

Q

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Well, it's at least strongly suggestive that the skin doesn't work that way. If sebum has no effect at improving moisture levels in the skin and is not in any was associated with them, then why would the body increase sebum as a response to dry skin?? It really doesn't make much sense...

Bryan

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I had only skin too. I drank apple cidar vinegar 2-3 times a day, applied it at night.

did that for a few weeks. Then I applied lemon juice on my face and drank 1 teaspon in 1 glass of warm water in the mourning. Did that for 1-2 weeks. Then I applied bp gel, and it started working in 2 weeks. No pimples. When I stopped, (because I ran out), i got a couple of pimples. Now I started again, broked out like hell, but will stick with it for 2 weeks to see how it goes.

Doing the 3 day apple diet starting tommorow. Feels like I need a good liver flush.

3 day apple diet consists of:

1) Eating nothing but apples (at least 10)

2) Drink as much water as possible

3) end of each day, till 4 the day, do enemas or if you can't do that use children enemas ( which is something you drink)

4)at the 4 the day, Have 1 glass of cranberry juice (i think or was it grape juice), and 1 tbsp of olive oil,

5) apply Castor oil before you go to sleep, and wash it off when you wake up

This will help your skin and reduce your oil production a lot.

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Well, it's at least strongly suggestive that the skin doesn't work that way. If sebum has no effect at improving moisture levels in the skin and is not in any was associated with them, then why would the body increase sebum as a response to dry skin?? It really doesn't make much sense...

Bryan

I do see what you're getting at. It just troubles me that the survey is of elderly people only.

I am in no way citing this as a scientific observation, but I do notice that when my own skin gets over-dry, it becomes very tight and also very greasy and shiny. The greasiness does not seem to actually help the dryness, just sort of sits on top of it. Moisturizer, hydration and EFAs do help.

Q

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I do see what you're getting at. It just troubles me that the survey is of elderly people only.

The point of that article is that BOTH ends of the age spectrum fully support their conclusion: the very young (children), and the very old. They pointed out: "In spite of the clear inference to be drawn from the cutaneous characteristics of children and the experimental data obtained from the elderly, it remains difficult to dispel the myth that low sebum secretion rates cause dry skin." Can there really be much doubt that the same holds true for the "in between" folk?

I am in no way citing this as a scientific observation, but I do notice that when my own skin gets over-dry, it becomes very tight and also very greasy and shiny. The greasiness does not seem to actually help the dryness, just sort of sits on top of it.

A few times now, I've mentioned how puzzled I am by all the attention given to "moisture" and "moisturizers" on this site. More puzzling still is that I can't get anybody to discuss it with me! :) Q, I'd appreciate it if YOU could explain to me exactly what the symptoms are of "over-dry" skin. Specifically, I'm interested in the contrast between skin that only lacks moisture (water), and skin that only lacks oil, and how one clearly differentiates between those two. For example, if as you say your own skin happens to be very greasy, how exactly do you actually KNOW that it's also very "dry" (in the moisture sense)?? Please help me to understand how you make that distinction...

Bryan

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A few times now, I've mentioned how puzzled I am by all the attention given to "moisture" and "moisturizers" on this site. More puzzling still is that I can't get anybody to discuss it with me! :) Q, I'd appreciate it if YOU could explain to me exactly what the symptoms are of "over-dry" skin. Specifically, I'm interested in the contrast between skin that only lacks moisture (water), and skin that only lacks oil, and how one clearly differentiates between those two. For example, if as you say your own skin happens to be very greasy, how exactly do you actually KNOW that it's also very "dry" (in the moisture sense)?? Please help me to understand how you make that distinction...

Bryan

When my skin is dry, it's tight and has a stretched look to it. It loses elasticity. The expression lines are deeper and more pronounced. It feels extremely sensitive. Severely over-dry spots become scaly and red.

Add a layer of grease on the top, and it's just not healthy-looking!

Q

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