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That the computer brightness is damaging our skin? I know when I am at the computer it hurts my eyes and I've also noticed that my skin looks redder right when I get up after using it for awhile.

Does anyone notice this? (You wouldn't notice unless you sit at the screen for some time, and then use the rest room or otherwise go to a mirror.)

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Guest james11

paranoia, paranoia everybody's coming to get me!!

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That the computer brightness is damaging our skin? I know when I am at the computer it hurts my eyes and I've also noticed that my skin looks redder right when I get up after using it for awhile.

Does anyone notice this? (You wouldn't notice unless you sit at the screen for some time, and then use the rest room or otherwise go to a mirror.)

OMG!!! This is definitely NOT the dumbest question I have ever heard...so leave her alone guys!!! lol. Emmanual, I totally know what you are talking about. I am glad I'm not the only one that noticed this as well.... Sometimes I sit on the computer for many hours straight...as the hours go by, I can feel my skin and eyes "aging" and getting parched, like I'm under a great deal of stress..but I'm not.

I would look in the bathroom mirror and Sheesh!!! my skin looks HORRIBLE!!!!. All blotchy, every scar and wrinkle looks deeper and more pronounced too!!! Very scary and.. really quite depressing.

This only happens after long term computer use...no computer=no scary skin vision in the mirror, not that I can see anyways..lol

I have come to the conclusion, the computer brightness is not messing with our SKIN, it is messing with our EYES...

:think:

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Guest james11

I have the conclusion. It's not your eyes, it's your mind!!

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My dad told me something about the light from the computer monitor being bad for the skin too. He said that he has read articles from newspapers that the computer monitor emits UV rays that causes aging.

Of course I don't care. :rolleyes: I need my computer dammit!

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Well, I notice a difference and I am not paranoid about my skin and scars.

It is known that it messes with your eyes. And I'm not sure about this but I once read or heard it emits an almost UV light.

Bonnie: My redmarks and scars look worse after a long time at the screen, too. My skin looks just generally bad overall if I am at the screen too long.

I can notice the difference because I go days without being on the computer.

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Well I never meant to be rude or anything but, I have never thought of that before.

and I dont see how it can. it's not like super bright that's its killing your face & eyes to look at.

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That the computer brightness is damaging our skin? I know when I am at the computer it hurts my eyes and I've also noticed that my skin looks redder right when I get up after using it for awhile.

Does anyone notice this? (You wouldn't notice unless you sit at the screen for some time, and then use the rest room or otherwise go to a mirror.)

Well I don't know about your theory, but I know that the computer hurts my eyes! I have contacts and actually, they are bothering me right now.

I don't think that the computer screen effects anyones acne because there are people, such as Marino and Adam, and I don't believe their acne is getting much worse. I don't even think Marino HAS acne. I don't know his history here though. :shifty:

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That the computer brightness is damaging our skin? I know when I am at the computer it hurts my eyes and I've also noticed that my skin looks redder right when I get up after using it for awhile.

Does anyone notice this? (You wouldn't notice unless you sit at the screen for some time, and then use the rest room or otherwise go to a mirror.)

Well I don't know about your theory, but I know that the computer hurts my eyes! I have contacts and actually, they are bothering me right now.

I don't think that the computer screen effects anyones acne because there are people, such as Marino and Adam, and I don't believe their acne is getting much worse. I don't even think Marino HAS acne. I don't know his history here though. :shifty:

I'm not talking about acne I'm talking about hyperpigmentation, skin tone and scar appearance.

I don't care if you believe me and I am not offended. I know that it's bad in high amounts. I can tell and it actually makes a hella lot of logical sense if you think about it: you're sitting in front of a bright light for hours - it is bad for skin and eyes.

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I sit in front on my computer for like.. 12 hours a day. ha yeah.

oooh & if you're stoned, then go on the computer, it's fun as hell!

but if you think about the light hurting your eyes, it really does!!

like you cant even look at the screen without sqinting, & even then it hurts!

its very odd.

well byee

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Ok, here's the straight dope.

There's two sorts of computer screens, CRTs (glorified TVs) and LCD.

CRTs do *not* emit ultraviolet. They do emit a *tiny* amount of X-rays- but it's too small to worry about; and it's blocked by the air and special lead glass that is used to make the display.

People who have measured it say that LCD displays do not emit ultraviolet either.

The redness you get from using a computer is very probably stress and sitting still too long.

Terri- you're problems with your contact lenses are very probably because you're not blinking enough. It's a common problem.

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I still disagree. I'm not stressed at the computer.

It's definately bad for your eyes.

Not looking for an argument...JMO.

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...2815&query_hl=2

Background

Recently, it has been observed that Video Display Terminals (VDTs) usage for long periods can cause some dermatological manifestations on the face. An analytical cross-sectional study was designed in order to determine this relationship.

Methods

In this study, 600 office workers were chosen randomly from an organization in Tehran (Iran).

The subjects were then divided into two groups based on their exposure to VDTs.

306 workers were considered exposure negative (non VDT user) who worked less than 7 hours a week with VDTs. The remainders 294 were exposure-positive, who worked 7 hours or more with VDTs. The frequency of dermatologic manifestations was compared in these two groups.

Results

In the exposure-positive and exposure-negative groups, the frequency of these dermatologic manifestations were 27 and 5 respectively.

After statistical analysis, a P.value of < 0.05 was obtained indicating a statistically significant difference between these two groups for dermatological manifestations.

Conclusion

According to our study, there is a relationship between dermatologic manifestations on the face and exposure to VDTs.

There is growing evidence that long term exposure to the types of unfavorable working conditions that have been observed among some VDTs users might have serious health consequences [1].

Dermatological manifestations, especially on the face are one of these health outcomes [2].

The most common manifestations among these patients are nonspecific erythema, acne rosacea, seborrheic dermatitis, pruritus, burning sensation, and dry skin [3].

The prevalence of these manifestations among VDTs users ranges from 8–10% in a series of descriptive studies to 13.5% in other reports [4].

Radiation emissions from VDTs such as x-ray, ultraviolet, infrared are within acceptable levels and there is neither a connection between these radiations and health consequences, nor with any dermatological manifestations [4,5].

As a whole, the exact cause of these facial manifestations of VDTs users is not clear, but physical conditions of the workplace such as dryness, occupational stress [6], electrostatic fields [7], and to a lesser extent, electromagnetic fields of VDTs can play a role [8,9].

The relationship between working with VDTs and dermatological manifestations has not previously been investigated. Accordingly, this study was designed.

An analytical cross-sectional study was conducted by using office workers of an organization in Tehran.

Age, gender and weekly hours of work with VDTs were considered as independent variables and dermatological manifestations on the face including erythema, acne rosacea, scaling, pruritus and burning sensation as dependent variables.

600 office workers were selected randomly from the workers with approximately same environmental conditions (temperature, humidity, light, etc.) and were divided into two groups according to VDT exposure in the past year.

The exposure-positive group consisted of those with 7 hours or more weekly exposure to VDTs in the workplace or home and the exposure-negative group with less than 7 hours weekly exposure.

The workers filled in a questionnaire and had a physical examination.

Non specific erythema, acne rosacea, scaling and seborrheic dermatitis were detected during examination and were considered as positive dermatologic findings. Pruritus and burning sensation which got worse or were produced by working with VDTs and alleviated after leaving the workplace were considered as acceptable positive dermatological findings.

Tables

Table 1

Frequency distribution of office workers with relation to age and gender.

Table 2

Frequency of dermatologic manifestations in workers with more than 7 hours weekly exposure and less than 7 hours weekly exposure

Table 3

Frequency distribution of exposure positive group with weekly work hours and dermatologic manifestation

251 workers were females and the remainders 349 were males.

Age and sex distribution of the workers is demonstrated in Table (1). The average age was 44.5 years.

294 workers had seven or more weekly hours of exposure and 306 had less than seven hours of weekly exposure in the past year.

In the exposure-positive group and exposure-negative groups 128 and 123 workers were females and 165 and 183 workers were males respectively.

The average weekly exposure in the exposure- positive group was 14 hours.

In the exposure-positive group 27 workers (16 female and 11 male) and in the exposure- negative groups 5 (3 female and 2 male) had dermatological manifestations respectively, as depicted in Table (2).

Frequency of the exposure-positive workers according to their weekly hours of exposure and the frequency of dermatologic manifestations is shown in Table (3).

Statistical analysis of the confounding factors (age and sex) was performed between the two groups and no statistically significant difference was observed.

Use of chi-square test led to a P.value of less than 0.05, indicating statistical differences between exposure-positive and exposure-negative groups for the above mentioned dermatological manifestations.

On the other hand, Table (3) clearly indicates that the frequency of dermatological manifestations of the face tend to increase with increasing weekly hours of work with VDTs(chi-square, linear by linear association: statistic = 12.735, df = 1, P.value < 0.005).

In a study conducted by Stenberg B. et al., psychosocial conditions and exposure to electromagnetic fields or conditions associated with such factors were related to an increased occurrence of skin symptoms.

The results also indicated that personal factors such as atopic dermatitis and physical exposure factors influencing indoor air quality, such as paper exposure and cleaning frequency were related to an increased prevalence of symptoms. The results suggest that skin symptoms reported by VDTs users have a multi-factorial causation [2]. According to other reports, mainly from Norway and Sweden, video display terminal work is suspected of causing skin rashes.

Three different studies, have tried to elucidate the question, and the results point to a possible relationship between VDT work and aggravation of some common skin diseases such as rosacea, seborrheic and atopic dermatitis, and acne. Whether this depends on physical, chemical, or psychological factors is still unknown[10].

Conclusion

According to other studies and our own study, we can propose a relationship between dermatological manifestations on the face and exposure to VDTs and the probability of the occurrence of these manifestations increase with increasing exposure time.

Based on our findings and those of others, we recommend that in workers with long time exposures to VDTs who display dermatological manifestations of the face, occupational history of working with VDTs, weekly hours of exposure, and effects of exposure on their symptoms should be considered.

Competing interests

The author(s) declare that they have no competing interests.

Authors' contributions

AO participated in the design of the study and performed the data collection.

MP conceived of the study, and participated in its design and coordination.

SA drafted the manuscript and coordination.

RE performed the statistical analysis.

IM and MM drafted the manuscript.

All authors read and approved the final manuscript.

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I still disagree. I'm not stressed at the computer.

It's just because you're sitting in the same position for relatively long periods.

It's definately bad for your eyes.

Well, it's been studied quite a lot; people's eye's don't change prescription for example, and there's no know link with blindness or anything.

You can get sort of mild/temporary eyestrain, but I don't get it at all for example. The better your monitor is, the less likely you are to have problems I think. Monitors are one of the more critical components.

I'm running my 18' CRT monitor at 1600x1200 and I can use it for hours and hours without problems, with contact lenses. I seem to recall a 15' monitor running at 1024x768 was somewhat tiring; and it was much more fuzzy.

I think LCDs are better/sharper though; so a lower resolution is ok.

The problem with fuzzy monitors is that your eye is constantly trying to focus and failing.

But I'm certainly not trying to criticise your monitor, or your eyes or anything, I'm just giving examples. YMMV.

I'm quite sure there's no UV on computer monitors.

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I found some interesting articles, WF.

And how would me sitting hurt my skin's appearance?

Skin changes in "screen dermatitis" versus classical UV- and ionizing irradiation-related damage--similarities and differences.

Gangi S, Johansson O.

Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

An increasing number of persons say that they get cutaneous problems as well as symptoms from certain internal organs, such as the central nervous system (CNS) and the heart, when being close to electric equipment. A major group of these patients are the users of video display terminals (VDTs), who claim to have subjective and objective skin- and mucosa-related symptoms, such as pain, itch, heat sensation, erythema, papules, and pustules. The CNS symptoms are, e.g. dizziness, tiredness, and headache. Erythema, itch, heat sensation, edema and pain are also common symptoms of sunburn (UV dermatitis). Alterations have been observed in cell populations of the skin of patients suffering from so-called "screen dermatitis" similar to those observed in the skin damaged due to ultraviolet (UV) light or ionizing radiation. In "screen dermatitis" patients a much higher number of mast cells have been observed. It is known that UVB irradiation induces mast cell degranulation and release of TNF-alpha. The high number of mast cells present in the "screen dermatitis" patients and the possible release of specific substances, such as histamine, may explain their clinical symptoms of itch, pain, edema and erythema. The most remarkable change among cutaneous cells, after exposure with the above-mentioned irradiation sources, is the disappearance of the Langerhans' cells. This change has also been observed in "screen dermatitis" patients, again pointing to a common cellular and molecular basis. The results of this literature study demonstrate that highly similar changes exist in the skin of "screen dermatitis" patients, as regards the clinical manifestations as well as alterations in the cell populations, and in skin damaged by UV light or ionizing radiation.

Publication Types:

Review

Review, Tutorial

PMID: 9412815 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.f...2815&query_hl=2

Cutaneous mast cells are altered in normal healthy volunteers sitting in front of ordinary TVs/PCs--results from open-field provocation experiments.

Johansson O, Gangi S, Liang Y, Yoshimura K, Jing C, Liu PY.

The Experimental Dermatology Unit, Department of Neuroscience, Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden.

BACKGROUND: Considerable controversy has surrounded the question of possible biological responses to electromagnetic fields (EMFs) generated from visual display terminals (VDTs), such as personal computers (PCs) and ordinary television sets (TVs). The cellular and molecular mechanisms for such potential harmful health hazards have not yet been understood, although clues from the literature include mast cells and histamine. The aim of this study was therefore to investigate possible biological mast cell responses to TV/PC screens. METHODS: Using the indirect immunofluorescence technique, we studied the presence of histamine-containing mast cells in the dermis of healthy volunteers. Cutaneous biopsies taken before and after exposure to ordinary TV/PC screens for 2 or 4 h were investigated in 13 healthy subjects. RESULTS: Our present in vivo study indicates that normal cutaneous mast cells could be altered by exposure from ordinary TV/PC screens. To our great surprise, we found the number of mast cells in the papillary and reticular dermis to increase, to varying degrees, in 5 out the 13 subjects after such an exposure. A migration of mast cells towards the uppermost dermis appeared as the most important event. Thus, the normally upper "empty zone" of the dermis disappeared, and instead, a higher density of mast cells were found in this zone. These cells also seemed to have a tendency to increase in number towards the epidermal-dermal junctional zone and some of them lost their granular content and the cytoplasm shrunk (=degranulation). These findings could only be seen in the exposed skin. Two of the 13 cases instead showed a decrease in mast cell number, but the shift in mast cells towards the upper dermis was still visible. Twenty-four h after the provocation, the cellular number and location were normalized in all subjects. CONCLUSIONS: By definition, normal healthy volunteers are assumed not to react to a TV/PC screen provocation. To our great surprise, this proved not to be true.The present results might lay a foundation to understand the underlying cause of so-called "screen dermatitis" with special reference to mast cells. However, blind or double-blind experiments using patients ought to be further investigated in order to find out the exact cause for the observed changes. Such causes include the effects of surrounding airborne chemicals, stress factors, etc.

PMID: 11737520 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

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Wow! Great articles! I only read half though, my face and lips started to feel parched...seriously. I do most of my work on the computer. Winter is coming and I will def. be spending more time pewting...by spring I should look like a prune. I knew it wasn't my imagination...but I really wish it was. .............Now, I'm off to WalMart to purchase a Halloween mask... :ninja: or perhaps some paper bags.

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Wow! Great articles! I only read half though, my face and lips started to feel parched...seriously. I do most of my work on the computer. Winter is coming and I will def. be spending more time pewting...by spring I should look like a prune. I knew it wasn't my imagination...but I really wish it was. .............Now, I'm off to WalMart to purchase a Halloween mask... :ninja: or perhaps some paper bags.

This really has to be one of the silliest posts I have seen. I work from my computer and do classwork so I am in front of my pc a lot. I would look wretched if this were the case. I have never noticed anything besides tired eyes from working too long.

not your post Bonnie the entire thread is silly.

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That the computer brightness is damaging our skin? I know when I am at the computer it hurts my eyes and I've also noticed that my skin looks redder right when I get up after using it for awhile.

Does anyone notice this? (You wouldn't notice unless you sit at the screen for some time, and then use the rest room or otherwise go to a mirror.)

I wondered this too and thought I was crazy. But it might not be that nuts. After all the sun we know is bad for our skin, and computer screens (the old ones anyone) emit somekind of cathode ray thube thing as well. I'm with you here

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After all the sun we know is bad for our skin, and computer screens (the old ones anyone) emit somekind of cathode ray thube thing as well.

No. They don't. They're carefully designed not to.

I checked the research out. It's bullshit. For them to have proven that say, EMF or UVB actually causes skin effects they would have to have done a double blind test. They haven't done it, so it remains speculation what if anything is causing the results they have. And note some of the experiments involved 'watching TV'.

The simplest theory is simply that any effects they have found are due to:

a) stress

b) experimental error

Stress on it's own can explain all the results. They're basically describing histamine reactions (hives, well known to be stress related).

But no; of course it's space monstersradiation!

Uh huh.

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After all the sun we know is bad for our skin, and computer screens (the old ones anyone) emit somekind of cathode ray thube thing as well.

No. They don't. They're carefully designed not to.

I checked the research out. It's bullshit. For them to have proven that say, EMF or UVB actually causes skin effects they would have to have done a double blind test. They haven't done it, so it remains speculation what if anything is causing the results they have. And note some of the experiments involved 'watching TV'.

The simplest theory is simply that any effects they have found are due to:

a) stress

b) experimental error

Stress on it's own can explain all the results. They're basically describing histamine reactions (hives, well known to be stress related).

But no; of course it's space monstersradiation!

Uh huh.

Stess doesn't make scars look worse and tone.

I have the studies, but furthermore, I noticed it before the studies, which prompted me to look into it.

For all of you saying this thread is silly, You'll find out later I'm right. And I'm not looking for validation. I know it makes my redmarks a deeper color and my skin tone crap.

It isn't stress WK. I don't get hives and I have no acne. It affects my tone, redmarks and scar appearance. How many times do I have to say that?

But no; of course it's space monsters radiation!

Uh huh.

That is an asshole remark. :| Typical from you.

And while we're at it, you never answered my question about your remark on how sitting for long periods affects my skin and scars. What studies do you have for that? That is utterly ridiculous. At least I posted actual studies and didn't cite sitting as being bad for the skin...LMAO!

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Stress does make your skin look worse. It makes u feel like shit and everything suffers because of it. Live stress free exercise and eat right

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Stress does make your skin look worse. It makes u feel like shit and everything suffers because of it. Live stress free exercise and eat right

I know stress affects the skin, but at one time, no one believed that or me when I said it.

I do eat right, etc.

I am not stressed on the computer; moreover, even when I am stressed ( not on the computer, or on it) it doesn't make my scars, redmarks and tone look like it does after being in front of the screen for hours.

Incidentally, I lowered my screen's brightness and contrast and it is much dimmer; however, I still want to limit my access to < 5 hours per week.

Stress does make your skin look worse. It makes u feel like shit and everything suffers because of it. Live stress free exercise and eat right

I still am anxious to know how sitting for long periods affects the skin....

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Wow! Great articles! I only read half though, my face and lips started to feel parched...seriously. I do most of my work on the computer. Winter is coming and I will def. be spending more time pewting...by spring I should look like a prune. I knew it wasn't my imagination...but I really wish it was. .............Now, I'm off to WalMart to purchase a Halloween mask... :ninja: or perhaps some paper bags.

This really has to be one of the silliest posts I have seen. I work from my computer and do classwork so I am in front of my pc a lot. I would look wretched if this were the case. I have never noticed anything besides tired eyes from working too long.

not your post Bonnie the entire thread is silly.

oh..Im glad you cleared ^^^ that up..I almost burst into tears....lol

I have to agree with ALL Emmanual stated about this. I also agree with your wording "wretched", it's an accurate way to describe how I see my scars after hours on the computer. Before you comment that I prolly look wretched anyways..lol....I don't...the "after" computer vision in the mirror is a complete 1-80 as the before view...same mirror.

Like Emmanual ..I am not under ANY stress on the computer, not dehydrated, eat well, take vitamins..etc..all that good stuff. I have had this "problem" ever since I got my 18" LCD flatscreen a few years ago....until she brought this up, I thought it was my imagination...now I know its not. I am lowering the brightness and contrast as well...Im curious to see if it helps.

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