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I know oily skin is gross and quite frankly annoying... but is it bad for your skin? Will it cause more acne if you dont use BP or SA is dry up your face? My mom read that it's horrible to dry out acne. So Im just wondering how bad oily skin is.

Any thoughts?

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Guest Amy Lee

I can't say oily skin does not cause acne, or it can...

From my observations, I have dry butt cheeks and still I breakout there. Also my stomach part, not oily yet gets acne.

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It's hard to say, it depends on the person. There are people out there that have oily skin but do not get acne. On the other hand oily skin is caused by overactive sebacious glands which is a cause of clogged pores. If you're oily and you have acne, I bet the two are related.

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Guest <*>

I have oily skin and I am sure my acne is caused by it. When my skin is dried out I don't get spots.

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I know oily skin is gross and quite frankly annoying... but is it bad for your skin?  Will it cause more acne if you dont use BP or SA is dry up your face?  My mom read that it's horrible to dry out acne.  So Im just wondering how bad oily skin is.

Any thoughts?

The main cause is clogged pores. That's why people with dry skin have acne too. When their skin tries to shed those cells, their pores get clogged, and bam, acne. If your skin sheds "right" then you won't get clogged pores and you get no acne. That's why you see people who have rather oily skin who are also acne-free.

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doggy hit the nail on the head: i'll copy this right here from a previous post i made:

it's important to bear in mind that people with dry skin can have acne because they can have hyperkeratinization (excess skin cell shedding within pore) even though their sebum production is comparatively low; the pores will still be blocked by the excess shedding of keratinized epithelial cells, at a rate of something like every 3 days in the case of most acne sufferers rather than roughly every 28 in most with normally keratinising non-acneic skin.

conversely, people with oily skin can be acne-free because despite high sebum production their keratinization is normalized so skin cells within the pore do not desquamate (shed off) so quickly and unevenly as to clump and stick together, thereby potentially blocking pores.

* * *

so to answer your question, yes oiliness can cause acne if your pilosebaceous units tend toward hyperkeratinization but it won't if they don't. if your keratinization is normalized then no matter how much sebum you produce you won't get acne. this is why kel knows people who are oily-faced but acne-free, and why, on the other hand, amy lee has dry skin on buttocks but still gets acne there. kel's friends keratinise properly but amy lee's butt skin, alas, does not.

what you should do if you want to start taking steps to minimize oiliness is don't use soap, just wash at most twice daily, with a mild non-drying cleanser if you want, and above all always moisturize non-comedogenic after showering. exfoliating gently from once a day to twice a week always help ensure that these too-rapidly shed skin cells don't block the pores but are brushed out. maybe check out some other stuff i do in my own acne program linked below to see if it helps.

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