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Hey every1. I just read about how eating foods with low-glycaemic could help your acne because this scale basically deals with how different foods spike your blood sugar.

I was just wonderin has any1 here tried this diet and did it work or not?

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Hey every1. I just read about how eating foods with low-glycaemic could help your acne because this scale basically deals with how different foods spike your blood sugar.

I was just wonderin has any1 here tried this diet and did it work or not?

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Ditch the GI and stick to the GL index. It's more accurate as it give a better picture on serving sizes. The GI uses a set amount of grams of carbs for every food, which is really inaccurate compared to how many people really eat in a meal(And every food is different).

Remember: Protein, fats, fiber, and low GL foods will always lower the GL of GI index of higher foods. Eg. Rice at dinner with meat and veggies will keep your blood sugar level whereas rice alone may not(Brown and white rice have very little difference in GI or GL and are both high).

Try looking at diabetic sites as they can give you better info. than us and they're bodies are way more sensitive than ours to changing glucose levels(Well, if not more sensitive at least the symptoms are far more pronounced and immediate).

Avoiding dairy is altogether another issue because all dairy has a very low GI and GL level. If it does increase insulin it's by other means than sudden surges in glucose.

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biggrin.gif thx so much minnie! Finally some sorta hope where diets concerned. ya just get reli confused with the rubbish everywhere feeds u about there bein no link with diet - especially my GP evil.gif neways cant wait to get started biggrin.gif

And black invaluable advice thx - tho do ya know where i cud find a list of foods with their GL's? I can't find any quick enuff cry.gif

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hmm...the GL index shows certain foods i normally avoid due to high GI to be not that bad after all...like watermelon. can i ask how come some of the GL are missing for certain foods? and how come ice-cream has lower values than i expected? i mean, even after converting to GL, i would expect ice-cream to have high values, but that doesn't seem to be the case.

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Ice cream has a surprisingly low GI probably because of its sugar-fat emulsion (the fat greatly slows down the absorption of the sugar). Just goes to show that the amount of sugar in a food is not the only factor which influences the GI, but also other factors which alter its absorption, like fat, protein, soluble fiber, etc.

Bryan

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Heck yes!  Many are having great success avoiding:

refined sugar

refined grains - eat brown rice

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Ditch the GI and stick to the GL index. It's more accurate as it give a better picture on serving sizes. The GI uses a set amount of grams of carbs for every food, which is really inaccurate compared to how many people really eat in a meal(And every food is different). 

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Sorry, yes soluble, gotta gave that gooey fiber. I say fiber because in many foods that I eat there are both.

I will stick with the GL if I ever decide to use it(I have to eat so much healthy fats, protein, and low GI/GL foods and fiber(To keep regular) to keep my weight up that my blood sugar is constant). Most people don't understand that for many fruits and veggies the standard(I believe 50g) of carbs used for the GI is unrealistic and thus they avoid things like carrots and watermelon like the poster above. For breads, rice, pasta, etc.... 50g is very little for most adults meals. SO they end up with a skewed vision of what foods spike blood sugar relative tothe amount they are eating. It's hard to guess what 50g or carrots, watermelon, berries, rice is when you're not making every meal yourself.

The GL takes in serving size into account and I like that because you can tailor it to how much you usually eat very simply. Sure it may take an extra 15sec or so for each food you eat but given a hour you'll have the GL for every food you eat in the sizes you eat them in. If you decide to eat more or less you can get a good estimate of how much the GL is going to go up or down as the calculation is pretty simple. I suppose GI is like that as well but GL takes into account an average portion of food that most people eat, plus many are confused with things that are far from the 50g mark.

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Remember that the link between GI/GL and acne appears to be _insulin levels_, the idea being that high insulin levels screws up your hormones related to sebum production and keratinization. So ideally we would be relying on a comparative insulin index of foods, but that it still under development as I understand it.

Now this next point is important: if insulin is the link, you must avoid most dairy products because dairy (in spite of being low GI/GL) really sends your insulin levels up.

If you're trying low-GI but still going for milk products, expect failure.

My skin has cleared up a lot since going on a low-GL non-dairy diet. It's still not 100 percent, but I only adhere to the diet about 2/3 of the time, so I figure there is some residual acne still coming through, along with some still being produced, but at a lower level than before.

If I could up the adherence figure and throw out any other particularly insulinotropic foods from my diet (I still consume plain cocoa, which is known to be insulinotropic), maybe I could get there.

On the other hand, maybe the last couple of months have just been nature's idea of a joke and I'll soon go back to being like before ... sad.gif

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Remember that the link between GI/GL and acne appears to be _insulin levels_, the idea being that high insulin levels screws up your hormones related to sebum production and keratinization. So ideally we would be relying on a comparative insulin index of foods, but that it still under development as I understand it.

Now this next point is important: if insulin is the link, you must avoid most dairy products because dairy (in spite of being low GI/GL) really sends your insulin levels up.

If you're trying low-GI but still going for milk products, expect failure.

My skin has cleared up a lot since going on a low-GL non-dairy diet. It's still not 100 percent, but I only adhere to the diet about 2/3 of the time, so I figure there is some residual acne still coming through, along with some still being produced, but at a lower level than before.

If I could up the adherence figure and throw out any other particularly insulinotropic foods from my diet (I still consume plain cocoa, which is known to be insulinotropic), maybe I could get there.

On the other hand, maybe the last couple of months have just been nature's idea of a joke and I'll soon go back to being like before ... sad.gif

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It's not just dairy, any protein rich food requires a surprising amount of insulin compared to their GI/GL level. Meat, fish, eggs, etc... However we can't just go out and avoid protein dense foods can we so again, and this is key for everyone who isn't allergic or whatever to foods, moderation is key. Dairy, junk food, etc... all in moderation.

However, even though these foods have a higher insulin level than GI/GL, they are still pretty damn low. In fact all dairy, meats, etc... are still below the level of that of brown rice, grains, LENTILS, fruits, etc... Meaning that for the vast majority of foods that aren't protein rich, the insulin index is predicted accurately by the corresponding foods GI/GL level. Are you going to give up lentils, fruits, brown rice, etc... that you all tout as great acne foods in place of dairy, red meat, etc...

I think some of you that aren't intolerant to these foods should rethink why you don't like them. Is it dairy you think is bad or is it things like antibiotics, growth hormones, etc... that you object to. If it's the latter, it shouldn't be a problem outside of the US and maybe England and even within you have organic alternatives.

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Blackbirdbeatle, I congratulate you on a well thought-out and reasoned post! eusa_clap.gifeusa_clap.gifeusa_clap.gif

Bryan

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Get real, Minny.  As "blackbirdbeatle" pointed out, brown rice has just as high a GI as white rice.  And refined grains, most likely.

Oh, by all means!  lol.gif

Bryan

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I'll "get real" while you eat your white rice and white bread.  Geez

I just find that grains in their most natural state are best for our family.

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I agree with Minny though when she says it's better to eat natural foods, regardless of the GI/GL level. It just so happens that "natural" more often than not happens to mean nutrient dense and I'll eat my brown rice becuase of the extra fiber and my lentils because it has high protein, fiber, overall calories which I need to keep up my weight. The most nutrient dense food I've seen by far is calf liver. If you look at the stats for it, it has numerous vitamins and minerals where it provides like 500% of the RDA and countless others where it provides like 30-100%. It produces a high insulin response but man is it nutritious.

I also don't worry about insulin that much because I eat plenty of low insulin foods(READ: veggies which are pretty much it for foods that don't create much of an insulin response, well fats as well I suppose). I also exercise like crazy and workout and that really helps my body accept the insulin/glucose because I actually need a lot of that energy to keep me as active as I am and to feed my muscles.

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Uhh...yes, but we weren't talking about what's best for overall health.  Somebody had asked SPECIFICALLY about the glycemic index of foods, and the relationship of that to acne.  You immediately replied to that person with an exclamation ("Heck yes"), and suggested the substitution of brown rice for white rice.  You strongly implied that brown rice has a lower GI than white rice, which is not the case.

I certainly agree with you about your preferance for "natural" foods, but I think you should learn to use a little more precision in your reading and writing (I also couldn't help but notice that recently in another thread, you confused what a poster had said with what he had QUOTED from another person).

No, I haven't read that.  Sounds like a good one!  Have you read "Nutrition Against Disease", by the famous biochemst Roger Williams?  It has an excellent section in it about food faddism, including the unscientific prejudices that some people have against milk.  In fact, a couple months back, I posted several paragraphs of what he said right here on this site.  Did you read that?

Why didn't you post that nice, clear statement to that other guy, instead of the one that strongly implied that brown rice has a lower GI than white rice? wink.gif

Bryan

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Sweetjade,

Sorry, no refs for the II stuff, other than the pitifully meagre things that are out there already.

BlackBirdBeatle,

As I understand it the insulin response provoked by milk is much worse not only by what you would expect from its own GI, but by comparison to _other protein-containing foods_. So I can eat beef, but drinking milk is a big mistake. Milk has been described as 'strikingly insulinotropic'. I haven't seen anything similar in the lit about beef or eggs (beef gives a higher insulin response than eggs, by the way). So some proteins are safer than others for these purposes, it seems - and dairy proteins are apparently the worst.

Regards,

kx

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Not true. In the only real study done quite a bit of dairy was found to have a relatively low insulin response. It was high compared to it's GI/GL but it was still lower than brown rice, fruits, etc... Cheese, cottage cheese, butter, etc... I believe milk and yogurt was the two that were higher but it may only have been milk.

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Excuse me ok? Gosh you really do jump on me.  It all started with that "get real Minnie" statement, which I didn’t think was the best way to make a point either, but since it was directed at me, I felt a need to respond. 

And what a lecturer you are to boot.  Ok - I'll be more careful in all my readings and in everything I type.  I APOLOGIZE to all I may have misled.  Please forgive me as I was in a big hurry when I made that first post and didn't think too clearly when I stated that brown rice was the better choice when it comes to GI diets.  I hope you didn't all rush out and purchase a 5 lb bag on my account

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Blackbirdbeatle,

You are partly correct and partly wrong. Correct in that there is some variation in the insulin response offered by dairy foods - cheese gives about the same or lower response than beef (from memory, beef is in the high forties, cheese in the low forties. For comparison, eggs are in the low thirties, and fish stands at near sixty!). However, apart from cheese and probably butter (though I do not recall a figure for this), _most_ dairy products have a _very high_ insulin index score: around 80 or so.

In terms of triggering an insulin response, pound-for-pound milk is twice as bad for you as beef.

So it looks like you can get away with cheese and butter. All other dairy products (including yoghurt) are highly insulinotropic.

If high insulin levels are part of the acne problem, and we are seeking a method of dietary control, then it stands to reason that we have to severely curtail or entirely eliminate high-GI cereals and insulinotropic milk products (i.e. most of them). Though I am pleased to see I might be able to start eating cheese again ...

Regards,

kx

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