Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...
dermpatron

Acne and scars made me an Atheist

Recommended Posts

I am by no means of the imagination evil or cynical. Just seems silly to believe there is some greater being watching over us. Belief in Gods was something man made to explain the phenomena about them and it is so ingrained in our culture that we can't move on from our primitive behavior. I beleive in coincidence.

Anyone else not believe in God?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not really sure what I believe in, but I don't believe all that stuff that god created the universe in what..7 days or something! rolleyes.gif I'm doing biology at uni and it's pretty safe to say that that theory is wrong. But then sometimes you wonder that there has to be something that created us the way we are today, who knows?!

Link to post
Share on other sites

"I cannot conceive of a personal God who would directly influence the actions of individuals, or would directly sit in judgment on creatures of his own creation. My religiosity consists in a humble admiration of the infinitely superior spirit that reveals itself in the little that we, with our weak and transitory understanding, can comprehend of reality. Morality is of the highest importance-but for us, not for God."

Einstein

idea.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
I'm not really sure what I believe in, but I don't believe all that stuff that god created the universe in what..7 days or something!  rolleyes.gif  I'm doing biology at uni and it's pretty safe to say that that theory is wrong.  But then sometimes you wonder that there has to be something that created us the way we are today, who knows?!

Link to post
Share on other sites

Im sort of agnostic but sometimes I cant help but believe in some sort of God just because I dont know what made this world. the big bang theory is nice but I cant ever help but thing what was here before the big bang theory..

Link to post
Share on other sites

I beleve in God. Quite deeply, actually.

But I'm not Christian. I don't believe in the concepts of sin, or evil, or of salvation. I'm not Wiccan, or much of anything that requires a regimen of worship. Call me lazy, but I just prefer to talk to God on my way to work and let it be.

Alot of people say they are 'aethist' but what they really mean is "I'm pissed off at the Christian idea of God." There are so many different ideas of God out there to choose from - hell, to pick and choose any piece of anything you like to make up what you want - that it seems silly to just get angry at just one version of God.

dermpatron doesn't seem to be one of those folks, tho. smile.gif

Link to post
Share on other sites
Alot of people say they are 'aethist' but what they really mean is "I'm pissed off at the Christian idea of God." There are so many different ideas of God out there to choose from - hell, to pick and choose any piece of anything you like to make up what you want - that it seems silly to just get angry at just one version of God.

Link to post
Share on other sites

No offense to anyone, but i find the belief in god very silly. I just cannot bring myself to even understand the people who believe in god. I don't understand how they do it. I'm a highly scientific person and i requiere proof every step of the way in order to even consider the probability of something being true.

So no, i do not believe in god, and i don't plan on believing in him/her/it any time soon.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Agreed, Cindy.

In High School, we were once asked to write a short essay on the purpose of education. I wrote that it was to teach students HOW to learn, the building process, the step by step process of research and assimiliation of information into your own life and actions.

I got an A, apparently only a few other students out of 130 had a similar theory.

As far as history, it is written by the winners. Why is that pages and pages of our social studies books were dedicated to the battle over ending slavery, but the Japanese-American camps during WW2 were given only a paragraph? Is it because we as a country were 'supposed' to be over that by then, and it was embarressing?

I try not to let those things make my head hurt TOO much (I have to ration enough energy to go to work and clean house occasionally!), but it does get me into a gibbering mess sometimes.

As far as religion, I found I didn't believe in the majority of Christianity - although there were a few bits I liked that I kept. I found out that I'm WAY to clumsy to be dancing around circles of candles, so Wicca was generally out. I did like thier dedication to nature, so I like talking long walks and occasionally talking to trees. I liked the whole Buddhist compassion thing and "God is everywhere" thing, but didn't much like the idea of "Life is suffering." So, bits and pieces, movies and books, conversations here and there with different people all make up what I believe.

And yes, I WILL admit to occasionally getting frothy at the mouth at the 'religious right'. But not too many days, anymore.

It's okay, Ewok. I don't understand aethism. I have a friend who is, indeed, a true aethist, and I just don't get it. Not even intellectually. But that's okay. There's plenty out there I don't understand, and plenty I probably won't understand even until the day I die!

Link to post
Share on other sites

If you believe in God or not, an explanation for why we are diseased is because it will effect us in our lives. God has known us before birth. He has made and created our plan. (This is from a religous view)

I am an atheist, so I think what I stated above is yoooohabullshit... but people that are turning down religion... come on, thats just stupid.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm not sure if I believe disease is rooted in spiritual design or not. I have an addictive personality, which has led me down some really not so fun roads. I'm more of the mind to believe that my personality devolped more from enviromental factors and conditioning, but I do try to reap spiritual benefits from my experiences.

I mean, what the hell, why not? Gotta look on the bright side of things!

Link to post
Share on other sites

It would appear that I am preaching to the converted (or unconverted, as it were) by sharing this but I believe that many of you will find this interesting. At 17 I read this http://www.freethoughtfirefighters.org/SAD...a_dying_man.htm and decided to study as much as I could about theology before becoming an atheist. The language is rather ornate as it is translated from the 18th-century French, but this is a gospel for any self-professed atheist, along with Nietzsche's Der Antichrist.

While atheists are often stigmatized as being arrogant, pretentious and condescending (history's most famous atheists being French, after all), the argument that it is quite simply the most intellectually responsible course to take is difficult to reconcile with the fact that most if not all of history's greatest minds, including luminaries vastly cleverer than you and me put together, have been very religious (including Einstein, despite the implication of the previous quotation, who in his last years claimed that he had been convinced of the existence of a benevolent higher power after hearing Yehudi Menouin play the violin)... only thing is these intellectual giants all gave great credence to different religions, usually whichever one was most appropriate to their own cultural context. Consider that even the vast majority of Nobel Prize laureates, ostensibly among the more intellectually robust and responsible members of humankind, are not openly atheistic. Indeed the one openly atheistic individual ever awarded the Nobel Prize also happens to be the only person in the history of the Nobel Prize who actually REJECTED it: the creator of existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, in 1964.

The best resource I have found for understanding why as atheists we should actively believe what we do and find strength, meaning and purpose in these beliefs is here http://www.infidels.org/news/atheism.

"If god did not exist it would be necessary to invent him."

- Voltaire

Link to post
Share on other sites
It would appear that I am preaching to the converted (or unconverted, as it were) by sharing this but I believe that many of you will find this interesting. At 17 I read this http://www.freethoughtfirefighters.org/SAD...a_dying_man.htm and decided to study as much as I could about theology before becoming an atheist. The language is rather ornate as it is translated from the 18th-century French, but this is a gospel for any self-professed atheist, along with Nietzsche's Der Antichrist.

While atheists are often stigmatized as being arrogant, pretentious and condescending (history's most famous atheists being French, after all), the argument that it is quite simply the most intellectually responsible course to take is difficult to reconcile with the fact that most if not all of history's greatest minds, including luminaries vastly cleverer than you and me put together, have been very religious (including Einstein, despite the implication of the previous quotation, who in his last years claimed that he had been convinced of the existence of a benevolent higher power after hearing Yehudi Menouin play the violin)... only thing is these intellectual giants all gave great credence to different religions, usually whichever one was most appropriate to their own cultural context. Consider that even the vast majority of Nobel Prize laureates, ostensibly among the more intellectually robust and responsible members of humankind, are not openly atheistic. Indeed the one openly atheistic individual ever awarded the Nobel Prize also happens to be the only person in the history of the Nobel Prize who actually REJECTED it: the creator of existentialism, Jean-Paul Sartre, in 1964.

The best resource I have found for understanding why as atheists we should actively believe what we do and find strength, meaning and purpose in these beliefs is here http://www.infidels.org/news/atheism.

"If god did not exist it would be necessary to invent him."

- Voltaire

Link to post
Share on other sites

I am a Buddhist because my parents are but I always find myself questioning any religion. And i find alot of things that religion preached hrad to believe. I mean at times turning to religion can give you peace and hope but if you really think about it, mankind are corrupted by religion most of the time. And there are so many religion that you wonder which one is the god? So i dont really believe in any religion but i do kind of believe that there is a godlike figure somewhere out there just because there are alot of things in life that cannot be explained. Human design is truely amazing.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Here's another quote:

"We must question the story logic of having an all-knowing all-powerful God, who creates faulty Humans, and then blames them for his own mistakes."

-Gene Roddenberry, Creator of Star Trek (1921-1991).

Antony, ever heard of Camp Quest? 

http://www.camp-quest.com/

Link to post
Share on other sites
Personally I think that if you reject god then you must necessarily reject morality (in a classical sense, at least).

Antony: You say it's difficult to reconcile the "intellectually irresponsible" fact with the fact that many intelligent people believed in god, then you say that Einstein became convinced after hearing good music. Does not jive. It's just appeal to authority - look at the strength of arguments, not who makes them.

and afaik, most nobel prize winners are not vastly intelligent, just above average. I really have nothing to back that up though.

edit: another thing to take into account is that most of history's luminaries have lived in an age when it was risky to be an athiest.

Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest OrangeFlower

I find this thread saddening

I used to be agnostic/atheist

im not afraid to admit now, that since i've begun to believe in Him that the idea of God brings me comfort

yet believing in God and having faith isn't always comfortable -but life is like that

there was this story that a pastor in church told us-im really bad at remembering details but it was about a boy in Russia who lived in an orphanage.

the orphans were taught religion and morals and he started believing in God

one day as an arts and crafts project they had to make nativity scenes. He was only like 7 years old.

he put two babies in the manger of baby jesus. When asked why he put two babies in this 'crib' he said the other one was him.

He then said something like, i had nothing to offer jesus, so i told him that i would keep him warm by laying in the manger beside him as another baby.

He said he had no mother or father anymore and that all he would want in return is if Jesus was with him forever and always.

I think there is still a little 'child' within us that will always look for a Father, greater than the father or mother on earth because they are so disappointing. Even when i was atheist and my boyfriend was an atheist we still mentioned 'God' as if he was real. We would joke about it. But there was that child in us that longed for the hope.

Link to post
Share on other sites
A humanist summer camp? Brilliant! I have GOT to sign up as a counsellor this summer!

I see that the Canadian Camp Quest is at Muskoka-- my cousins have a place up there and I used to go up to my buddies' cottages in Muskoka for weekend parties all the time back when I was in high school in Toronto (live in Dublin now).

What a terrific concept, but I really wonder what kind of lovely, eccentric parents send their kids there, because in North America today it really is an act of almost deviant social protest to be outspokenly secular (not that I disapprove; indeed I applaud), as in to emphatically not observe socially institutionalised rituals deriving from organised religion, such as Christmas for glorifying the anniversary of a human being's alleged incarnation as a god in human form, which while maintaining your ideological integrity as a secular humanist/atheist won't make for the happiest of kids when they're the only ones on the block to not get the latest Pogs or whatever (I know I'm like so 1996). Instead of Kumbaya do they sing Monty Python's The Galaxy Song http://www.metrolyrics.com/lyrics/62656/Mo...hon/Galaxy_Song and instead of canoeing do they conduct rigorous and repeatable empirical experiments?

Link to post
Share on other sites

I think science is a bit fickle as it will tell you that something can't come out of nothing, but yet it won't admit that there is a supernatural element out there, because to me it is theory of deduction, nothing ordinary and physical could have started this world and if it did, where did that come from? Therefore, an eternal God outside of time and space must exist and it is not coincidental that as humans we are born with a sense of morals, questions, sense of spirituality that you can't measure by science but is there, it's not emotional immaturity its human nature. We are imperfect and get religion wrong quite a bit, however, maybe the perfect god who made us imperfect had his reasons and our intellect just can't fathom it, but as christians we can use our faith with our intellect, and I believe both are powerful.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes


×