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manolis_04

what is a trans fat?

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Same thing. Trans fats is what you get when you take an unsaturated fat (Poly or mono) and subject it to hydrogenation, usually hardening it. There are no health benefits from it, it doesn't even make foods taste better as many other bad things do suich as MSG or refined sugar. It's pretty much only for the appearance of foods.

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Yes, anything that says hydrogenated or paritally hydrogenated is a trans fat. They chemically alter the oil, as BBB says, to make it more "stable" which is a complete joke because it becomes totally rancid and carcinogenic by the process. A hydrogenated liquid oil will be a thicker consistency, so that's why it's in cool whip, peanut butter, crackers, cookies and a million other things. Become a vigilant label reader if you want to avoid it.

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just to add to this...

Trans fatty acids are actually harder to remove from our arteries, they tend to cling to the wall of our arteries more than normal fats.

This has got to be one of the worst modern food creations.

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Yeah. Avoid anything with the word "hydrogenated," or "shortening" on the label. High heat such as deep drying also changes cis fats into a trans configuration, to some degree. The higher the heat the more the change.

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Yeah. Avoid anything with the word "hydrogenated," or "shortening" on the label. High heat such as deep drying also changes cis fats into a trans configuration, to some degree. The higher the heat the more the change.

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I had read a little phrase about 2 weeks ago and I decided to do a search on it. Someone said something like: "Hydrogenated oil is one molecule away from being plastic" or something like that. Then, this is something I found when looking. I'm gonna try to put up some other links on this as well. Check this out:

The following article is an excerpt from the book

"The Facts About Fats", by John Finnegan, 1993.

Permission to reprint was given by:

Celestial Arts Publisher

PO Box 7123

Berkeley, CA 94707

---------------------

Fred Rohe is a well-known figure in the natural foods movement and author of several books, including "The Zen of Running", "Dr. Kelley's Answer to Cancer", and "The Complete Book of Natural Foods". He operates an advertising agency called Organic Marketing and is a marketing consultant for the natural foods industry. What follows is an historic study on margarine, which he tells in his own words.

The Great Margarine Experiment -

"Between 1965 and 1973, I owned a couple of natural food stores, one in San Francisco, California, and one in Palo Alto. One day, I was talking to a food technologist who shopped regularly in my San Francisco store, and he told me how he thought the term 'plastic food' must have originated. Some biochemist, he speculated, must have observed that, when looked at through a microscope, a hydrogenated fat molecule looks very much like a plastic molecule. Spontaneously, he or she coined the phrase.

"There was something in the conversation much more compelling to me than any notion he had about how the term originated. 'Well,' I asked, 'if it looks a lot like plastic, isn't it, in fact, a lot like plastic?"

'Yes,' he answered. 'Lipid chemists actually talk about plasticizing oils.'

"His answer made me think about what business I was in. I was selling a lot of margarine to people who were assuming, as I had, that it was real good. Should I just tell them about it, or should I take a more radical approach? I decided to discontinue selling margarine, as well as products containing vegetable shortening, margarine's cousin, and to perform a little experiment.

"It was a real layman's experiment, not the least bit technical. I put a cube of margarine (the kind I had been selling) on a saucer, and placed the saucer on a windowsill in the back room of my store. I reasoned that if I made it readily available, and if it were 'real' food, insects and microorganisms would invite themselves to the feast. Flies, ants and mold would be all over it, just as if it were butter. If nature treats margarine the way it would treat butter, I thought, it would be circumstantial evidence that margarine is really more like food than like plastic. Seeing such evidence, I could then sell margarine again.

"That cube of margarine became infamous. I left it sitting on the windowsill for about two years. In all that time, nobody ever saw an insect of any description go near it. Not one speck of mold ever grew on it. All that ever happened was that it . . . half-puddled down from the heat of the sun beating through the windowpane, and it got dusty - very dusty. A cube of margarine does not clean up very well. Finally, it started looking so revolting that I decided to terminate the experiment. For me, the experiment had not been foreshortened. I had reached the conclusion long before that margarine really is not food. It is really a form of edible plastic.

"Apart from the experiment, what brought me to that conclusion was learning about hydrogenation, the process of hardening vegetable oils so they can be made into margarine and vegetable shortening. No matter what kind of oil it is, hydrogenation ruins its nutritional value.

"To hydrogenate, natural oils are heated under pressure for six to eight hours at 248-410°F and reacted with hydrogen gas, using a metal-like nickel or copper as a catalyst. If this process is brought to completion, as in vegetable shortening, you have a partially hardened oil, as in most margarines . . .

"Nutritionally worse than saturated oils are the partially hardened oils produced by hydrogenation. This is due to the formation of 'trans' fatty acids. According to Bailey's Industrial Oil Guide, the percentage of fat that has been transformed into trans fatty acids in margarines ranges between 20 percent and 40 percent. [. . . Because of their unusual molecular structure, trans fatty acids disrupt normal metabolic functions; raise LDL cholesterol levels; lower HDL levels; and also interfere with the work of necessary essential fatty acids throughout the body.] . . .

"If an altered fat molecule takes the place of an essential fat molecule in your membrane structure, the result is that your membrane then has a faulty structure . . . Faulty structure causes a faulty function. Faulty membranes are just one of the many [abnormalities] incorporated into our natural defense systems by the altered molecules in our industrialized food supply.

"Hydrogenation, which until now has drawn so little attention, may turn out to be one of the very worst of the many nutritional insults introduced during the 20th century. In the 1990s, death from heart attacks is 35 times more frequent than it was in 1900.

"It would be foolish to suggest that hydrogenated fats are the sole cause of the contemporary epidemic of heart disease, but a little-known study undertaken in India suggests a major role played by altered fats, in this tragic state of affairs. It was reported in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 1967, 20:462-75.

The study was performed by Dr. Malhotra, medical doctor for the Indian National Rail System. He found two population groups in India, one in the north, the other in the south. The northerners were meat eaters, and the main source of fat in their diets was 'ghee' (clarified butter). You might assume, therefore, that they had high cholesterol levels. You would be right.

"The southerners were vegetarians, with much lower cholesterol levels. Even so, they had 15 times the rate of heart disease compared to their northern neighbors. The major dietary difference, Dr. Malhotra found, was in the kind of fat the southerners used. They had abandoned the traditional use of ghee (real food), in favor of 'plastic food' (margarine and refined polyunsaturated vegetable oils).

"A follow-up study done 20 years later found that the Indians in north India are having many MI (heart attack) deaths. The British medical journal, 'The Lancet' on November 14, 1987, contained a letter from Bihari S. Raheja of Jasiok Hospital in Bombay. He wrote that MI (myocardial infarction) deaths in India have greatly increased as the polyunsaturated liquid vegetable fats, and the margarines made from them, have largely replaced ghee in the Indian diet.

"It seemed there were two reasons for the switch: one was that margarine was cheaper than ghee; the other was that doctors had been telling people that they would be healthier if they replaced the 'bad' saturated fat of ghee with the 'good' polyunsaturated fat of refined vegetable oil.

"I wish I could tell those Indians not to believe it, that the modern experiment of replacing natural foods with industrialized foodstuffs has proven to be a health disaster. Maybe they would get the point, if I could tell them [about my cube of margarine experiment, in the saucer on my windowsill] . . . "

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Yes, learn which oils you can heat to high heat.  Coconut is stable at high heat, and I sometimes stir-fry with sesame oil, but olive oil should be left unheated IMO, or heated VERY gently; on low heat.

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Weirdly enough, the "smoke point" test which indicates coconut oil is more stable than olice oil is not always accurate. In Udo Erasmus' book, Fats that Heal, Fats that Kill, he relays the findings of a study in whcih olive oil was exposed to high heat of similar to high temperature stovetop frying. The olive oil had ZERO hydrogenation. So, olive oil is a stable frying oil (rice bran oil is even better, but very expensive). Dr. Perricone recommends using using olice oil exclusively for cooking.

My doctor, an MD and naturopath, has told me that coconut oil must be consumed with 1 week of harvesting. But I am very skeptical of this claim.

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Is that Udo of Udo's Chioce oils(OMega fatty acids as well)? If so he makes the biggest piece of crap quality products. I wouldn't touch his oils with a 10 foot pole.

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Is that Udo of Udo's Chioce oils(OMega fatty acids as well)? If so he makes the biggest piece of crap quality products. I wouldn't touch his oils with a 10 foot pole.

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No it's not the soybean content it's just the quality is crap. I'd go with just about any other oil or omega blend over that one.

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Same with me BBB. What do you mean the quality isn't good? How do you know? Had it tested or something? eusa_eh.gifeusa_think.gifshock.gif

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Same with me BBB.  What do you mean the quality isn't good?  How do you know?  Had it tested or something? eusa_eh.gif  eusa_think.gif  shock.gif

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Lol, no not tested by me. It always affected me bad(The exact same oils from any other company helped me) and didn't last long or was rancid when I got it even when the original due date was still months away.

I ran across a review by someone who did test them and the concensus was that Udo's Blend was the worst. Health from the sun was among the best, hense I buy from them. It was in a magazine like discovery or new science or something I can't remember. It was at the begining of my supplement craze(And also the Omega 3 craze) a few years ago and it stuck with me ever since.

THey also use cheaper quality sources for thier oils. You are all talking baout getting back to nature and the purest quality well there are other companies that do better.

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Hmmmm....I don't recall them effecting me in a bad way or anything but to be honest I take macadamia nut oil myself now; one tablespoon in the morning and one at night sometimes. I love that stuff. Tastes fantastic.

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Regarding Denise's article -

Natural lipids/fats, in fact, are very similar to plastics, both being primarily hydrocarbons. Plastics are supersaturated and contain a few other elements. However, it is not difficult to convert natural fat into plastic, so it should not be seen as something horrendous. Just a friendly heads up smile.gif.

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