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Hi, well, i stopped drinking milk (other dairy too).

But i wanted to know wether soy milk is good???

I think its better: less fat, less hormones ( i think??),

same amount of protein, no lactose.

What do you guys think?

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There are plenty of negatives about soy milk. Just do some google searches on it. I tend to stay away from it as well.

Cinderella's Dark Side

The propaganda that has created the soy sales miracle is all the more remarkable because, only a few decades ago, the soybean was considered unfit to eat - even in Asia. During the Chou Dynasty (1134-246 BC) the soybean was designated one of the five sacred grains, along with barley, wheat, millet and rice. However, the pictograph for the soybean, which dates from earlier times, indicates that it was not first used as a food; for whereas the pictographs for the other four grains show the seed and stem structure of the plant, the pictograph for the soybean emphasizes the root structure. Agricultural literature of the period speaks frequently of the soybean and its use in crop rotation. Apparently the soy plant was initially used as a method of fixing nitrogen.13

The soybean did not serve as a food until the discovery of fermentation techniques, some time during the Chou Dynasty. The first soy foods were fermented products like tempeh, natto, miso and soy sauce. At a later date, possibly in the 2nd century BC, Chinese scientists discovered that a purée of cooked soybeans could be precipitated with calcium sulfate or magnesium sulfate (plaster of Paris or Epsom salts) to make a smooth, pale curd - tofu or bean curd. The use of fermented and precipitated soy products soon spread to other parts of the Orient, notably Japan and Indonesia. The Chinese did not eat unfermented soybeans as they did other legumes such as lentils because the soybean contains large quantities of natural toxins or "antinutrients". First among them are potent enzyme inhibitors that block the action of trypsin and other enzymes needed for protein digestion. These inhibitors are large, tightly folded proteins that are not completely deactivated during ordinary cooking. They can produce serious gastric distress, reduced protein digestion and chronic deficiencies in amino acid uptake. In test animals, diets high in trypsin inhibitors cause enlargement and pathological conditions of the pancreas, including cancer. 14

Soybeans also contain haemagglutinin, a clot-promoting substance that causes red blood cells to clump together.

Trypsin inhibitors and haemagglutinin are growth inhibitors. Weanling rats fed soy containing these antinutrients fail to grow normally. Growth-depressant compounds are deactivated during the process of fermentation, so once the Chinese discovered how to ferment the soybean, they began to incorporate soy foods into their diets. In precipitated products, enzyme inhibitors concentrate in the soaking liquid rather than in the curd. Thus, in tofu and bean curd, growth depressants are reduced in quantity but not completely eliminated.

Soy also contains goitrogens - substances that depress thyroid function.

Soybeans are high in phytic acid, present in the bran or hulls of all seeds. It's a substance that can block the uptake of essential minerals - calcium, magnesium, copper, iron and especially zinc - in the intestinal tract. Although not a household word, phytic acid has been extensively studied; there are literally hundreds of articles on the effects of phytic acid in the current scientific literature. Scientists are in general agreement that grain- and legume-based diets high in phytates contribute to widespread mineral deficiencies in third world countries.15 Analysis shows that calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc are present in the plant foods eaten in these areas, but the high phytate content of soy- and grain-based diets prevents their absorption.

The soybean has one of the highest phytate levels of any grain or legume that has been studied,16 and the phytates in soy are highly resistant to normal phytate-reducing techniques such as long, slow cooking.17 Only a long period of fermentation will significantly reduce the phytate content of soybeans. When precipitated soy products like tofu are consumed with meat, the mineral-blocking effects of the phytates are reduced. 18 The Japanese traditionally eat a small amount of tofu or miso as part of a mineral-rich fish broth, followed by a serving of meat or fish.

Vegetarians who consume tofu and bean curd as a substitute for meat and dairy products risk severe mineral deficiencies. The results of calcium, magnesium and iron deficiency are well known; those of zinc are less so.

Zinc is called the intelligence mineral because it is needed for optimal development and functioning of the brain and nervous system. It plays a role in protein synthesis and collagen formation; it is involved in the blood-sugar control mechanism and thus protects against diabetes; it is needed for a healthy reproductive system. Zinc is a key component in numerous vital enzymes and plays a role in the immune system. Phytates found in soy products interfere with zinc absorption more completely than with other minerals.19 Zinc deficiency can cause a "spacey" feeling that some vegetarians may mistake for the "high" of spiritual enlightenment.

Milk drinking is given as the reason why second-generation Japanese in America grow taller than their native ancestors. Some investigators postulate that the reduced phytate content of the American diet - whatever may be its other deficiencies - is the true explanation, pointing out that both Asian and Western children who do not get enough meat and fish products to counteract the effects of a high phytate diet, frequently suffer rickets, stunting and other growth problems.20

Soy Protein Isolate: Not So Friendly

Soy processors have worked hard to get these antinutrients out of the finished product, particularly soy protein isolate (SPI) which is the key ingredient in most soy foods that imitate meat and dairy products, including baby formulas and some brands of soy milk.

SPI is not something you can make in your own kitchen. Production takes place in industrial factories where a slurry of soy beans is first mixed with an alkaline solution to remove fiber, then precipitated and separated using an acid wash and, finally, neutralized in an alkaline solution. Acid washing in aluminum tanks leaches high levels of aluminum into the final product. The resultant curds are spray- dried at high temperatures to produce a high-protein powder. A final indignity to the original soybean is high-temperature, high-pressure extrusion processing of soy protein isolate to produce textured vegetable protein (TVP).

Much of the trypsin inhibitor content can be removed through high-temperature processing, but not all. Trypsin inhibitor content of soy protein isolate can vary as much as fivefold.21 (In rats, even low-level trypsin inhibitor SPI feeding results in reduced weight gain compared to controls.22) But high-temperature processing has the unfortunate side-effect of so denaturing the other proteins in soy that they are rendered largely ineffective.23 That's why animals on soy feed need lysine supplements for normal growth.

Nitrites, which are potent carcinogens, are formed during spray-drying, and a toxin called lysinoalanine is formed during alkaline processing.24 Numerous artificial flavorings, particularly MSG, are added to soy protein isolate and textured vegetable protein products to mask their strong "beany" taste and to impart the flavor of meat.25

In feeding experiments, the use of SPI increased requirements for vitamins E, K, D and B12 and created deficiency symptoms of calcium, magnesium, manganese, molybdenum, copper, iron and zinc.26 Phytic acid remaining in these soy products greatly inhibits zinc and iron absorption; test animals fed SPI develop enlarged organs, particularly the pancreas and thyroid gland, and increased deposition of fatty acids in the liver. 27

http://www.healingcrow.com/soy/soy.html

If you must have your milk then I suggest either rice milk or almond milk.

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Almond milk is delicious, too. Although very expensive. sad.gif

I haven't found soya milk to have affected my acne in any way, but I am aware that it does have negative side effects, and that I should be drinking almond milk instead. I just can't afford it as a poor student, though. sad.gif I think that as far as acne goes, soya is better than dairy, despite its possible negative effects.

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Almond milk is delicious, too. Although very expensive.  sad.gif

I haven't found soya milk to have affected my acne in any way, but I am aware that it does have negative side effects, and that I should be drinking almond milk instead. I just can't afford it as a poor student, though.  sad.gif I think that as far as acne goes, soya is better than dairy, despite its possible negative effects.

Was that from some Chain eMail? what negative side effects?

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Almond milk is delicious, too. Although very expensive.  sad.gif

I haven't found soya milk to have affected my acne in any way, but I am aware that it does have negative side effects, and that I should be drinking almond milk instead. I just can't afford it as a poor student, though.  sad.gif I think that as far as acne goes, soya is better than dairy, despite its possible negative effects.

Is it expensive? Here, it's comparable to soy milk in price.

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where do you buy yours? I can't look for any sad.gif

I'm in CT so we have different supermarket names, but the local supermarket Shaw's has the Pacific Foods brand of almond milk. A health food store called Wild Oats has the blue diamond growers brand(which tastes better and has more vitamins).

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Yes almond milk is goooooooooooooood.

I love chocolate soy milk (vanilla is good too). hmmm

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American milk isn't that great. All the hormones and "milk Producers" that the FDA allows them to use on the cows are banned in just about every other industrialized nation. It causes many problems, including cancer(The FDA even said so and I don't know why it's not on their ban list. Probably the reason so many Cox-2 inhibitors were kept on so long.). That being said I drink milk and eat dairy all the time, but I'm not from the states so I don't have that conflict to worry about.

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Was that from some Chain eMail? what negative side effects?

Well, I've read many reports on how soya may not be all that great. But if I was that concerned about the 'side effects' (silly term to have used, I know - sorry!), I wouldn't drink it. I think pretty much every food has some 'negative' aspects if you google it. I think if you got TOO obsessive about food, you just wouldn't eat anything. neutral.gif

Is it expensive? Here, it's comparable to soy milk in price.

Yeah, over in the UK, almond milk is £1.99 for a 1 litre, whereas Soya Milk is £0.69, so quite a big difference. sad.gif

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About hormones... Since I have started to use Birth control pill my acne is going away completely. I dont know if this has to do with the hormones in it but they work good on my skin.

I dont think stopping milk and dairy products will improve your skin. I mean give it a try but...I dont know. I just think acne comes from a wrong way for your body to process its oil.

And soy milk, well, it sure dont taste the same in cereals. Eww

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I was thinking about this too.

I know that Soy Milk has a lot of estrogen in it which is what women have a lot of when pregnant which is why they get all the emotional highs and lows...

I heard that estrogen helps maintain a nice healthy pimple free complextion which is why a woman's skin looks so healthy while pregnant.

any thoughts?

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Guest Brandon

I say, yay. If you really don't want to ditch milk from your diet, but are concerned about how it will effect your skin....then get silk! Good stuff.

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A while ago (probably a few months now) I stopped drinking cows milk and replaced it with soya milk. since then i rarely ever get new pimples. im just going through the process of the red marks fadeing.

i would definately recommend soya milk

i had also had other things done in the last few months aswel so its hard to pinpoint whether the soya milk is the most beneficial. other changes include: having amalgam (silver) fillings removed because they contain mercury - got white fillings put it instead, i drink green tea every day, i eat less junk food, i eat pumpkin seeds and brazil nuts daily, i have cod liver oil and omega 3 tablets daily, i also use a sauna and steam room 2-3 times a week...

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Thanks,

Are there any benefits to drinking organic milk?

Would you say almond milk is better for you?

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Unfortunately, almond milk doesn't contain as much protein, calcium or vitamin B12 as ordinary milk, so if you drink a lot of cows milk and decide to replace it with almond milk, it might be an idea to include other protein and calcium sources in your diet such as leafy green vegetables and canned fish.

Almond milk also tends to contain added sugar in the form of maltodextrin. But overall, I would say it is better for acne-prone people to drink than cows milk, in my experience.

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Guest Brandon
Thanks,

Are there any benefits to drinking organic milk?

Would you say almond milk is better for you?

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Are there any benefits to drinking organic milk?

You avoid supporting a horribly cruel industry.

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In my opinion soy milk really helped my skin...I remember the last time my face was pretty much cleared up and the only difference was that I was drinking soymilk...thats just me though...anyways...if you look at sweetjades post about anti-androgens, she talks about how soy contains an abundance of equol which is an anti-androgen...so...im back to drinking soymilk eusa_angel.gif if my face gets cleared up..i will be sure to post a topic about how well it worked...thats if it helps me clear up.. biggrin.gif

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hey whoitis...let me know how your soymilk experiment goes. I've cut it out awhile ago, but I never could tell if it did anything for me or not. I would like to introduce it back (I miss it cause I don't drink milk!) if it wouldn't aggrivate my acne. Good luck!

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