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Hello! 

Unfortunately, I have been blessed with oily and acne prone skin. My oiliest areas are the T-zone, which I find I need to blot every hour, and I have yet to find a solution to this. Are there any good products that oily people have had good luck with? 

I wear makeup if that makes a difference. I wear Becca mattifying primer and Estee Lauder Double Wear foundation. 

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some people here have had good results with the caveman regiment (ie not washing your face or minimal washing) -your skin calms down and stops producing so much oil after a few days (imo never was your face more than once daily).

you could try a mild, sls free soap or a soap free bar like sebamed

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The most common mistake with oily skin is thinking that your skin is too oily to hydrate.

I grew up with oily skin. As I grew older and went to esthetician school (skincare), I realized that MANY oily skin types are actually oily/dehyrated (dehydrated being the key word - NOT dry). Oily skin will often overproduce oil due to dehydration. It becomes a vicious cycle because people with oily skin will often not hydrate or try to get rid of natural oils quickly, leading to more dehydration, leading to more oil.

The only way to combat dehydration is : 1.) Drink a lot of water 2.) Hydrate your skin with a water based moisturizer.

I recommend drinking more water (this has helped my oily skin tons - I drink about 8+ cups a day) and moisturizing day and night with a water based moisturizer, such as Garnier's or Belif's Aqua Bomb.

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Check out my Oily thread, maybe a few helpful parts.
 

/topic/354191-oily-skin-must-go/?do=embed&comment=3502665&embedComment=3502665&embedDo=findComment">

 

Edited by OilyOneCanobe

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4 hours ago, tiffanyclaire said:

 Oily skin will often overproduce oil due to dehydration.

 
Skin does not over produce oil from dehydration. This is a really common myth. Oily skin is caused by internal factors; it has nothing to do with how dehydrated you are. Your sebaceous glands do not "make up" for the moisture lost from dehydration. 

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On 7/25/2017 at 6:48 PM, ImTheTinMan said:
On 7/25/2017 at 2:13 PM, tiffanyclaire said:

 Oily skin will often overproduce oil due to dehydration.

 
Skin does not over produce oil from dehydration. This is a really common myth. Oily skin is caused by internal factors; it has nothing to do with how dehydrated you are. Your sebaceous glands do not "make up" for the moisture lost from dehydration. 
Oily skin is not actually always produced by internal factors. As a licensed esthetician, oily skin can very much be "temporary" because of lack of moisture on the skin. What you apply topically can often make your skin OILIER (being the key term) than it normally is because people will often try to "dry it out." Although it is often caused by internal factors (hormones, diet, etc.) it can also be bettered externally which is what OP asked for advice for.  Edited by tiffanyclaire

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Yes agree with Tiffany...for me personally my oily skin improved dramatically when i quit exfoliating so often( probably dehydrated ). Its hard to say for sure the cause of your oily skin, but I would not rule out completely something other than internal factors.

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Is there scientific evidence that the sebaceous glands produce more oil when the skin gets dried out? As a person who actually has oily skin, topicals do not affect my sebaceous glands and there has been no scientific evidence to prove that whatsoever. One could dry out their skin completely, and still produce the same amount of oil. Why? Because your sebaceous glands do not know how much sebum is on the skin. No matter how much moisturizing cream you put on your skin, your sebaceous glands will continuously secrete sebum steadily. Here's a discussion about it: http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/35818-the-myth-of-skin-washing-and-sebum-production/

 

7 minutes ago, Alliloz said:

Yes agree with Tiffany...for me personally my oily skin improved dramatically when i quit exfoliating so often( probably dehydrated ). Its hard to say for sure the cause of your oily skin, but I would not rule out completely something other than internal factors.

Really? Try testing it out with a Sebutape and tell me if your skin ACTUALLY produces more oil when you over exfoliate. 

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1 hour ago, ImTheTinMan said:

Is there scientific evidence that the sebaceous glands produce more oil when the skin gets dried out? As a person who actually has oily skin, topicals do not affect my sebaceous glands and there has been no scientific evidence to prove that whatsoever. One could dry out their skin completely, and still produce the same amount of oil. Why? Because your sebaceous glands do not know how much sebum is on the skin. No matter how much moisturizing cream you put on your skin, your sebaceous glands will continuously secrete sebum steadily. Here's a discussion about it: http://www.acne.org/messageboard/topic/35818-the-myth-of-skin-washing-and-sebum-production/

That study/thread is outdated. Furthermore, as anything with skin - your mileage may vary. Just because you, or I for the matter, may not notice an increase in oil production when skin is dried out, it doesn't mean that many others don't. That's what's so difficult about skincare - what may be true for one person, may not be true for the other. I don't have a specific case study to cite, but here's an research journal  [in relation to cleanser and skin type compatibility] from 2006. I don't think it's available to the public, but it's available to read for those that have scholar/research accounts. 

"In addition to containing dyes and perfumes that can irritate and exacerbate acne, these cleansers often are too harsh and can result in excessive drying of the skin, which leads to overcompensation by the oil glands and ultimately to more oil on the surface of the skin. " 

Edit: You can read more on the topic by using Google scholar and researching oily skin and the effects of x,y,z products. You should be able to find a few case studies about oily skin and/or reducing the appearance of oily skin. 
Edited by tiffanyclaire

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1 hour ago, tiffanyclaire said:
That study/thread is outdated. Furthermore, as anything with skin - your mileage may vary. Just because you, or I for the matter, may not notice an increase in oil production when skin is dried out, it doesn't mean that many others don't. That's what's so difficult about skincare - what may be true for one person, may not be true for the other. I don't have a specific case study to cite, but here's an research journal  [in relation to cleanser and skin type compatibility] from 2006. I don't think it's available to the public, but it's available to read for those that have scholar/research accounts. 

"In addition to containing dyes and perfumes that can irritate and exacerbate acne, these cleansers often are too harsh and can result in excessive drying of the skin, which leads to overcompensation by the oil glands and ultimately to more oil on the surface of the skin. " 

Edit: You can read more on the topic by using Google scholar and researching oily skin and the effects of x,y,z products. You should be able to find a few case studies about oily skin and/or reducing the appearance of oily skin. 
All of the websites claiming that skin overcompensates from dryness lack scientific evidence, therefore, they're not reliable sources. Moreover, people who say that their skin overcompensates from dryness base it on personal observations without knowing what's ACTUALLY going on. These products may make people's skin APPEAR more oily, but not actually oily. Oil production is caused by androgen binding to the sebaceous gland receptors. As far as I know, topicals have no effect on androgen levels, therefore no topicals will affect the amount of oil produced at all. Is that enough explaining? If not, here's an explanation from a dermatologist:
https://www.sharecare.com/health/healthy-skin/what-myths-about-oily-skin
By the way, just because a thread is old does NOT mean it's outdated.  Edited by ImTheTinMan

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I've dealt with the same problem myself. For the acne on your forehead, are you using an topical gels like tretinoin? If not you might want to consider it- its not only great for acne but it also dries out the skin making it significantly less oily. However, the drying effect can get to be a bit much so make sure you're also moisturizing regularly. If that isn't an option for you I've tried applying regular talcum powder on my face before I go to bed and I've seen that really help in decreasing the oiliness. The main problem with the oil is that your body doesn't stop producing the oil even after your acne has cleared, which kind of sucks, which is why I've had to resort to methods like these to keep my face less shiny. I hope I've helped! :)  

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