Jump to content
Acne.org
Search In
Find results that contain...
Find results in...

Recommended Posts

On 11/24/2017 at 3:20 PM, OilyOneCanobe said:

Have you looked into RU58841 at all? (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7625751 & https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9449168)

Seems widely available in a topical solution and used by people regrowing their hair - hrmm..  Edited by Eugene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 28/11/2017 at 3:08 AM, Eugene said:

Have you looked into RU58841 at all? (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7625751 & https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/9449168)

Seems widely available in a topical solution and used by people regrowing their hair - hrmm.. 

Hi Eugene,
The link sais it uses finasteride and  RU58841. Where is this available for hair? Sais it reduces sebaceous glands by 60%, certainly worth a look into further.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
5 hours ago, OilyOneCanobe said:

Hi Eugene,
The link sais it uses finasteride and  RU58841. Where is this available for hair? Sais it reduces sebaceous glands by 60%, certainly worth a look into further.

 


I found quite a few places mentioned by people, though the solutions are really high in ethanol/alcohol. Might be worth formulating a gentler DIY version with the powder they're selling instead if it works:

https:// anageninc. com/ru58841-solution-50ml.html
https:// www.chemyo.com /ru58841-solution.html

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

So from a topical point of view, moisturizing is essential to keeping oily skin controlled. Your skin overcompensates is oil when it is dehydrated beneath the skin. Some symptoms you can feel when your skin is dehydrated is tightness or itchiness. Also when your skin is adequately hydrated, it can perform at its optimal level; the skin barrier naturally fights off bacteria and absorbs nutrients. 

I've been using some good korean skincare with helpful nutrients, including fermented products that help my skin absorb what it needs. Also rosehip oil is great for oily skin- it has a high linoleic to oleic acid ratio- which is what you want. Rosehip gets absorbed easily into the skin and does not leave a goopy layer on top. It also regulates oil production and has helped tremendously in fading my acne scars! :)

As far as supplements go, I just take fish oil and L-Lysine tablets. Although I will do more research on this topic. Hope this helps!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Oily skin and acne have been a huge struggle for me so I thought I'd add my thoughts to this thread. 

I currently take low dose accutane and B5 for my skin. This is working for me right now and I really don't have side effects from it. I definitely don't think doing this is for everyone, but my skin is extremely stubborn. Also, my mental health is pretty reliant on how horrible my skin is doing. I'm pretty healthy overall, and so I figure taking these things is like my one unhealthy habit.

Anyway, even while taking these things I do notice that my oil production fluctuates. For me it seems to be mostly based on how much fat I consume (even good fats). If I take Omega 3 or eat foods high in Omega 3 I'm a grease ball. Same thing happens to me when I eat nuts. So I try to eat a low fat diet. I have also noticed that my skin is less oily when I eat a lot of fiber, so I eat lots of oatmeal, prunes, etc. 

I also workout a ton. I workout 6 days a week. However, I have not noticed this make any difference in my skin.

This is working relatively well for me right now. My skin is a constant battle, though, so it's possible I may have to reevaluate my routine in the future. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi paigems,

There's some good material earlier on in this thread that may help you, just read through from page 1. There's a strong chance your body lost it's ability to process fats. Slowly, over time, your stomach acid has decreased and your bile has thinned, and now anything you eat that involves bile is met with resistance (or a stress response) from your body. There are some good suggestions given earlier that would help this out. 

To steer this conversation back to what it was, I always go back to the notion that your body knows how to overcome oily skin much better than any treatment we can do for it, so the key is getting your body back to normal again.

The latest bit of research I'm playing around with may be HUGE for oily skin sufferers. I don't want to say too much because it's mostly theory at this point, but I'm quickly learning how important it is. Simply put, oily skin might be a result of an inflamed portion of your brain that becomes insulin resistant. In order to overcome this insulin need, it changes how your body handles certain kinds of fat (triglycerides, specific fatty acids, etc) and what it does with them. This theory supports so much of the stories I hear about oily skin, why it improves sometimes and doesn't other times. It relates to the way the body interprets sensory input (signals from the outside world), stress, emotions, etc. and the responses it initiates internally. The relationship between oily skin and our brain is huge, because it explains the CHANGE in sebum that is so characteristic (yet overlooked) with oily skin, not just the amount. Also, interestingly enough, the area around the inflamed part is surrounded by emotional centers that seem to also affect it, explaining why emotional stress (stressful social situations) for many bring a rush of oil.  

The brain is not well understood, so the research isn't plentiful right now. Also, the notion that the brain can become insulin resistant and dictate the way our body controls fats is relatively new (at least as a mainstream concept). But, it's not just great for those with oily skin, it helps those with many other issues as well, like weight issues. It seems your body does interesting things when your brain is insulin resistant and trying to get it's insulin (or leptin) fix.

The solution isn't exactly straightforward either, but it involves resetting this area of your brain to become less inflamed and sensitive to insulin again. Typical things like a low inflammation diet helps, but some other stuff (still being explored) may help as well. Once you address this issue, there's nothing right now saying you can't return to having 100% normal skin, without the need for any skincare or mega dosing or accutane or anything. Your brain just simply tells your skin what lipids go where, and your body behaves like it should. Very exciting information for those who want to go the natural route and heal his or her body. I'll report back as soon as I can confirm more...

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

MyBody101, 

Do you have any studies regarding decrease stomach acid and bile thinning? Is this something that is backed up by science? I know many others that have problems taking Omega 3. There are a lot of people that report worse acne (even cysts) and oily skin from taking it. 

Some other comments I have regarding other things mentioned in this thread:

- If sebum produced was in direct correlation with triglyceride/cholesterol levels, then accutane should technically make people more oily. Accutane is known to increase serum triglyceride levels. My triglyceride levels were through the roof when I was on a large dose of accutane, but my skin was very dry. 

-Certain medications that are supposed to lower serum triglycerides supposedly increase sebum production. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16675962

- If insulin resistance was the root cause of excess sebum production, wouldn't you expect diabetics to have severely oily skin? A lot of diabetics have perfectly normal skin. Perhaps insulin resistance is an exacerbating factor, but I do not believe it is the root cause. 

As long as we're discussing the brain, though, I will mention that my skin is less oily when I take an SSRI. When I stop taking an SSRI my oily production increases dramatically. I am not sure why this is. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 30/11/2017 at 3:45 AM, Eugene said:


I found quite a few places mentioned by people, though the solutions are really high in ethanol/alcohol. Might be worth formulating a gentler DIY version with the powder they're selling instead if it works:

https:// anageninc. com/ru58841-solution-50ml.html
https:// www.chemyo.com /ru58841-solution.html
Hi Eugene

Looking at this again, the ethanol is just a carrier for the dht inhibitor they are using on the skin.  Although the oily skin reduction results in their trials were slightly higher in %, we can get the exact same effect of dht topical downplay with green tea at 3% egcg from the studies posted earlier in this thread by body101 (props),  applied once a day. It does the exact same thing.   Please scroll back through the thread, the trials are somewhere on here.
I have added this to my usual moisturiser and plan to continue with it. Does take 8 weeks to get to max effect though.
I wouldn't call it the cure, but I notice a difference which for such little effort is good enough for me.

I use a green tea concentrate, and calculate the egcg from there. Then add it to my moisturiser considering the weight ratio.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi guys, its been a while. 
Skin has been doing well of late,  Oil is under control...dare I tempt fate by typing this!

Its 17:30 in the afternoon and I've been walking for about an hour, I really should have more oil on my face than a Saveloy from the chip shop. Enough Oil to make Saudi Arabia want to Invest in pipe lines to my house, and enough Oil to run the risk of being invaded. 
You get the picture. 

But I'm not, the man in the mirror is Oil free. I may have to change my name.

My previously mentioned regime of mammoth proportions indeed has kept things under control, but I've built further on it. The only issue now is I have no clue which Individual protocol has had the highest contributory effect, so I'll list everything and you can go to town with it. (Perhaps it's the sum of all parts.)


I Intermittent fast for 16-20 hrs a day.  ("Go hungry") Abs are visible - stay lean or get lean.
Walk 10mins after every meal.
Walk for an hour a few days of the week.  
Full body weight training 2-3 times a week.
Nutribullet once a day, (spinach, celery, apple, banana, dark cocoa, coriander, ginger, tumeric, pepper, yoghurt, mixed nuts, apple cider vin)
Cold shower or bath twice a week.
Red LLLT 2-3 times a week , (I bought one off amazon)
Right before bed I take half a glass of water and sprinkle in a tea spoon of tumeric and a little pepper, and a splash of   apple cider vin. (Consider it an overnight liver clean)
Get good quality  sleep starting before 12pm.
ACV + Ginger shot 30min before main meal
Don't drink with food, 30min pre and post.

As for skin supplements....
DIM
Zinc
B complex
Copper
Vit D 30000iu per week (safe limits)
Ashwagandha (before bed)
Vit A  (Within the limits of the safe daily allowance) 

As for skin care, this is last on the list for a reason. It's no-where near as important imo as the above, but still It needs doing. 
I double wash, once with sunflower oil and then with a cleanser.
Alternate nights with an aha one night and adapalene the next.
Follow with green tea induced moisturiser 3% egcg.
Drink  plenty of clean water, I avoid tap.


Now that's about it. Take what you want from it, maybe only a few of these things are doing it or maybe its the effect of a little across the board, either way it works.


  

Edited by OilyOneCanobe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a heads up, I've accidentally found the first product with 3% EGCG: the Ordinary Caffeine + egcg. I've used it for undereyes but recently asked the company about the concentration of EGCG. I might go ahead and try applying it all over the face. Or at least half to see what happens. Though I'm not sure about of topical effects of 5% caffeine.. 

Edited by Eugene

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 03/07/2018 at 7:02 PM, Eugene said:

Just a heads up, I've accidentally found the first product with 3% EGCG: the Ordinary Caffeine + egcg. I've used it for undereyes but recently asked the company about the concentration of EGCG. I might go ahead and try applying it all over the face. Or at least half to see what happens. Though I'm not sure about of topical effects of 5% caffeine.. 

Hi Eugene

Looks good, the green tea egcg trials used 3% in an emulsion to get the results they mention, so this meets the spec.
Mine is home made, half mineral water half sunflower oil (emulsion), and I measure up the 3% egcg concentrate from a liquid I buy from amazon. Shake up and spray. Store in the fridge, lasts me about 2 weeks then I make another. A cheap way, but the same thing.
Hope its helping. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/6/2018 at 1:34 PM, OilyOneCanobe said:
Hi Eugene

Looks good, the green tea egcg trials used 3% in an emulsion to get the results they mention, so this meets the spec.
Mine is home made, half mineral water half sunflower oil (emulsion), and I measure up the 3% egcg concentrate from a liquid I buy from amazon. Shake up and spray. Store in the fridge, lasts me about 2 weeks then I make another. A cheap way, but the same thing.
Hope its helping. 
 
Any updates to share with us OilyOneCanobe on how your skin's doing these days? 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 14/09/2018 at 9:54 PM, MyBody101 said:
Any updates to share with us OilyOneCanobe on how your skin's doing these days? 

 
Hi there,
A bit of an oily return for me unfortunately... I put on a few pounds of fat and my oiliness has increased noticeably after a long stretch of being oily free. Disappointing.

I came to the conclusion that my way of controlling oily skin is largely via being as lean as possible, to abs very visible. Sebum ingredient ratio's considering, It made sense. But this was kind of cheating I admit, but it worked.
When I was leaner my hand palms would become extremely dry where I had to start using hand creams, I never experienced this before and can only put it down to my fat soluble vitamins being more easily metabolised stored and accessible while I was much leaner. And ofcourse the considerably less available triglycerides in my blood.  This all pushing me over the scale from extra oily to extra dry, not complaining at all though it was great.
Since becoming a bit chubby I have mixed a few ingredients around lately as pictured...after more study on the problem. (Staying super lean all of the time as a solution is incredibly difficult.)
The derma-roller pictured is used once a month, anti ageing and all that jazz. But it also temporarily damages my sebaceous glands and gives me 4-5 days window of noticeably less oiliness post treatment (Once a month only). The scary mask replaces my red lamp, so red LLLT 20min daily..from papers I have read this disturbs the sebaceous glands and dampens it down. The other pills are just one each per day. 
And lastly I use the egcg 3% emulsion.    
After noticing my oily increase after putting the fat chub back on, I had to accept that my regime of treatments and pills needed a mix up, so ratio of vitamin A has been upped to 7500iu's per day, with food this probably hits a little more.. this is within safe tolerances after doing some research the limit would be 10,000iu a day, before any reported adverse side effects have been reported, and I added the pictured sawpalmeto complex recently.. from studies it has been shown to dampen dht down by 30% as opposed to finesteride which pushes dht down by 60%+ in studies. I think this  is a safer option as I don't want to strip dht long term but only regulate it. As a bald headed guy I figured out I must have a lot of this. 
Ashwagandha and amla powder (not pictured) are also added to my smoothies for the adrenals/cortisol regulation.  So this is my current regime/stack. 
As I get back onto the treadmill to lose fat it will be difficult to tell if I'm using the fat loss to do the job or the stack.. but its the best I can do.
(A back-up, back-up plan, is always to destroy the sebaceous glands via lasers. But this idea is staying on the shelf. And would take me to the Dark Side!)

How are things with you and the oily battle??

1.thumb.JPG.572b1b3ead87ae922756a780dbf3d54a.JPG      Edited by OilyOneCanobe

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi, I'm after some advice from you all. I have recently changed my diet by cutting out most carbs and sugar to try and keep my blood sugar levels good. However I need to continue to eat enough food to gain weight as I'm quite skinny and have been trying to gain weight for a long time.

I'm eating a lot of meat and fish, eggs, lots of vegetable, bacon and sausages for breakfast. Nuts and dark chocolate too but I'm about 10 days into it and it seems to have made my skin worse. I'm wondering if I'm eating to much fat and it's making me oilier 

Do you think it will get better after a while or shall I start eating some carbs again. 

I'll be adding green tea and a few other things into my regime when I get paid this week so hopefully I'll see some results soon.

I've been oily for about 4 or 5 years now and it just seems to be getting worse. I'm 30 years old and it's so embarrassing. It's costing me about small fortune in blitig papers

I should add that I use epiduo 2.5% each night for acne but I'm thinking of stopping that. My acne seem's to be under control after cutting dairy out  

Edited by Ricky w

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/6/2018 at 1:34 PM, OilyOneCanobe said:
Hi Eugene

Looks good, the green tea egcg trials used 3% in an emulsion to get the results they mention, so this meets the spec.
Mine is home made, half mineral water half sunflower oil (emulsion), and I measure up the 3% egcg concentrate from a liquid I buy from amazon. Shake up and spray. Store in the fridge, lasts me about 2 weeks then I make another. A cheap way, but the same thing.
Hope its helping. 
 
Any updates to share with us OilyOneCanobe on how your skin's doing these days? 

 
On 9/20/2018 at 12:45 PM, OilyOneCanobe said:
Hi there,
A bit of an oily return for me unfortunately... I put on a few pounds of fat and my oiliness has increased noticeably after a long stretch of being oily free. Disappointing.

I came to the conclusion that my way of controlling oily skin is largely via being as lean as possible, to abs very visible. Sebum ingredient ratio's considering, It made sense. But this was kind of cheating I admit, but it worked.
When I was leaner my hand palms would become extremely dry where I had to start using hand creams, I never experienced this before and can only put it down to my fat soluble vitamins being more easily metabolised stored and accessible while I was much leaner. And ofcourse the considerably less available triglycerides in my blood.  This all pushing me over the scale from extra oily to extra dry, not complaining at all though it was great.
Since becoming a bit chubby I have mixed a few ingredients around lately as pictured...after more study on the problem. (Staying super lean all of the time as a solution is incredibly difficult.)
The derma-roller pictured is used once a month, anti ageing and all that jazz. But it also temporarily damages my sebaceous glands and gives me 4-5 days window of noticeably less oiliness post treatment (Once a month only). The scary mask replaces my red lamp, so red LLLT 20min daily..from papers I have read this disturbs the sebaceous glands and dampens it down. The other pills are just one each per day. 
And lastly I use the egcg 3% emulsion.    
After noticing my oily increase after putting the fat chub back on, I had to accept that my regime of treatments and pills needed a mix up, so ratio of vitamin A has been upped to 7500iu's per day, with food this probably hits a little more.. this is within safe tolerances after doing some research the limit would be 10,000iu a day, before any reported adverse side effects have been reported, and I added the pictured sawpalmeto complex recently.. from studies it has been shown to dampen dht down by 30% as opposed to finesteride which pushes dht down by 60%+ in studies. I think this  is a safer option as I don't want to strip dht long term but only regulate it. As a bald headed guy I figured out I must have a lot of this. 
Ashwagandha and amla powder (not pictured) are also added to my smoothies for the adrenals/cortisol regulation.  So this is my current regime/stack. 
As I get back onto the treadmill to lose fat it will be difficult to tell if I'm using the fat loss to do the job or the stack.. but its the best I can do.
(A back-up, back-up plan, is always to destroy the sebaceous glands via lasers. But this idea is staying on the shelf. And would take me to the Dark Side!)

How are things with you and the oily battle??

1.thumb.JPG.572b1b3ead87ae922756a780dbf3d54a.JPG     

Sorry to hear that OilyOneCanobe! 
 

I’ve been following a pretty fascinating rabbit hole for the last few months. Still plenty to discover, but getting to some very interesting conclusions. 

 

It started when I asked a relatively simple question - 

 

Is oily skin even a skin issue? 

 

Sure, your sebaceous glands are going crazy, everyone knows that. 

 

It’s even reflected in the common definition of oily skin: 

 

Oily skin is skin type characterized by too many lipids (aka oil) on the skin surface due to overactive sebaceous glands. 

 

But with everyone being so caught up with how active our sebaceous glands are, I asked, what if they’re not doing anything wrong? 

 

What if they’re not the issue, nor are the other message carrying parts of the body (like testosterone, DHT, insulin, IGF-1, etc)?

 

What if the whole chain of oily events is one big 100% intentional act, to serve another purpose somewhere else in the body?

 

Follow that rabbit hole and you’ll eyes will start to open. 

 

More to come as soon as I get my notes together… 

 

Stay strong OilyOnes… 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 23/09/2018 at 9:33 PM, Ricky w said:

Hi, I'm after some advice from you all. I have recently changed my diet by cutting out most carbs and sugar to try and keep my blood sugar levels good. However I need to continue to eat enough food to gain weight as I'm quite skinny and have been trying to gain weight for a long time.

I'm eating a lot of meat and fish, eggs, lots of vegetable, bacon and sausages for breakfast. Nuts and dark chocolate too but I'm about 10 days into it and it seems to have made my skin worse. I'm wondering if I'm eating to much fat and it's making me oilier 

Do you think it will get better after a while or shall I start eating some carbs again. 

I'll be adding green tea and a few other things into my regime when I get paid this week so hopefully I'll see some results soon.

I've been oily for about 4 or 5 years now and it just seems to be getting worse. I'm 30 years old and it's so embarrassing. It's costing me about small fortune in blitig papers

I should add that I use epiduo 2.5% each night for acne but I'm thinking of stopping that. My acne seem's to be under control after cutting dairy out  


Hi Ricky,
I tried the keto diet and found it didn't help me with oiliness, no stone un-turned and all that. I felt it was worth exploring.  I do notice a difference with whole wheat products to white flour products though, seems to make me more oil-puffy and that's not a good look. So I stick to whole wheat across the board, breads Pasta etc (in moderation).. I don't see a problem with it from my research, the keto-mafia would say otherwise though :)
You mention you are eating a lot more to put on weight, each time you eat no matter what it is you will temporarily spike your insulin, this continuous spiking throughout the day isn't great for us oily folk at all. And I'll guess its more this that is happening and has suddenly made you more oily than the actual type of food. I personally only eat during an 8 hour window, and walk for 10min after every meal. 
Experiment with your eating "times", and see if there is any change. I don't mean eat less, just either space your eating out massively or group it all much closer together. No grazing.  And get good quality sleep, any negative with my sleep and I become oilier than a Colombian cartel's accountant! 



 
11 hours ago, MyBody101 said:
Any updates to share with us OilyOneCanobe on how your skin's doing these days? 

 
Sorry to hear that OilyOneCanobe! 
 

I’ve been following a pretty fascinating rabbit hole for the last few months. Still plenty to discover, but getting to some very interesting conclusions. 

 

It started when I asked a relatively simple question - 

 

Is oily skin even a skin issue? 

 

Sure, your sebaceous glands are going crazy, everyone knows that. 

 

It’s even reflected in the common definition of oily skin: 

 

Oily skin is skin type characterized by too many lipids (aka oil) on the skin surface due to overactive sebaceous glands. 

 

But with everyone being so caught up with how active our sebaceous glands are, I asked, what if they’re not doing anything wrong? 

 

What if they’re not the issue, nor are the other message carrying parts of the body (like testosterone, DHT, insulin, IGF-1, etc)?

 

What if the whole chain of oily events is one big 100% intentional act, to serve another purpose somewhere else in the body?

 

Follow that rabbit hole and you’ll eyes will start to open. 

 

More to come as soon as I get my notes together… 

 

Stay strong OilyOnes… 

 

 

I recall reading somewhere an intriguing theory that Vit D(hormone) deficiency or another Sun based catalyst was maybe why increased oiliness occurred, as it apparently was the skin screaming for what it needed more of and pumping out extra oil as a kind of solar panel. Sounded far fetched to me, but I wonder if this is the direction your looking at. 
Looking forward to reading your work

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To all Oily sufferers,
Could this also be a body clock function issue? hmmm I wonder. 
Please can you leave a comment about your sleep wake cycles , amount of daytime sun you get outside and how oily you are?
I know from experience as a night owl, if I allow myself to go to sleep 2-4am for several days back to back I would easily bet my skin would be oily as hell during the day. Interesting to hear other experiences 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 9/20/2018 at 10:45 AM, OilyOneCanobe said:

Hi there,
A bit of an oily return for me unfortunately... I put on a few pounds of fat and my oiliness has increased noticeably after a long stretch of being oily free. Disappointing.

I came to the conclusion that my way of controlling oily skin is largely via being as lean as possible, to abs very visible. Sebum ingredient ratio's considering, It made sense. But this was kind of cheating I admit, but it worked.
When I was leaner my hand palms would become extremely dry where I had to start using hand creams, I never experienced this before and can only put it down to my fat soluble vitamins being more easily metabolised stored and accessible while I was much leaner. And ofcourse the considerably less available triglycerides in my blood.  This all pushing me over the scale from extra oily to extra dry, not complaining at all though it was great.

 

Are you sure it's about body fat percentage, and not calorie intake? Calorie restriction lowers testosterone and increases SHBG:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3569090/

"The data from the present study show that long-term CR with adequate nutrition is associated with lower circulating sex hormones in healthy lean men. Serum concentrations of total and free testosterone were significantly lower in CR participants than in body fat-matched endurance runners and non-obese sedentary individuals who were consuming Western diets.

The data from the present study also show that long-term CR with adequate nutrition is associated with a marked increase in SHBG, a circulating protein that binds to sex hormones and inhibits the function of these hormones."

 

Personally my skin is a little less oily when I eat in a caloric deficit, and a little more oily when I eat in a caloric surplus. Do you know how many calories you were eating when you were very lean?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Hey guys, sorry for the delay, but here’s what I’ve been working on lately. I think you’re gonna find it interesting - 

 

I think before we can get into any remedy for oily skin, we have to figure out what the actual problem is. 

Oily skin is commonly defined as this -

 

“Oily skin is characterized by an increased amount of lipids on the skin surface due to overactive sebaceous glands”.

 

This makes it sound as if the issue is the sebaceous glands being overactive, and if we can figure out how to stop them from being overactive, then we can “defeat” oily skin. 

This also happens to be the basis for almost every skincare product on the market which fights oily skin. Somehow get the sebaceous glands to calm the f down, either through constriction, drying, moisturizing, or even just breaking them. 

 

But what if it’s all wrong? 

 

If you’re on this site reading about oily skin, you know that skincare doesn’t solve your problem, there’s something else going on that no one has been able to figure out. 

To see any progress with oily skin, we have to start over with our understanding of it. For me, that started with this question - 

 

What if oily skin isn’t even a skin issue? 

 

Like... at all. 

 

(think about that for a second)

 

What if the sebaceous glands aren’t overactive at all, but behaving exactly as they should? 

What if the hormones that trigger oily skin, from testosterone and dht on the skin, to insulin and IGF-1 inside the body, are behaving exactly as they should? 

What if everything related to your skin being oily is 100% intentional and necessary? 

In that case, we would really need to know the “why” behind all these actions. What bigger purpose could they serve?
 

Why is there an abundance of oil (or lipids) on my skin for seemingly no reason? 

Why, every time I eat a carb, does my body expel excess fats/lipids/oils onto my skin? 

It’s such a strange mystery. 

But if we look at it in a different light, it may finally start making perfect sense. 

We assume that our skin is the only place that experiences a boost in lipids. 

 

What if that’s not the case? 

 

Inside the body, fat cells seem to get their cues from the same place that the sebaceous glands do, the blood. 

In older adults, there’s even a connection between visceral fat and oily skin, which OilyOneCanobe noted when he said he needed to see his abs to gain ground on his oily skin. 

What likely is happening is there’s an abundance of lipids circulating inside our body, not just on our skin. 


Now, think about this concept on it's own. 

What happens when you add excessive amounts of lipids to any human, or even mouse for that reason, in a lab experiment? 

The answer is insulin resistance. 

Many studies show this to be the case. 

So now the question becomes, what’s the point of your body getting flooded with lipids that seem to create an environment inside your body that encourages insulin resistance? 

Why would your body purposely cause itself to become insulin resistance? 

 

Here’s the kicker…

 

Because when the BODY experiences insulin resistance, the BRAIN can get it’s fix. 

Your brain consumes more glucose than any other organ, and when it comes to glucose, it’s the alpha. Insulin is the key that unlocks the doors for glucose to be used by the cells.

If you want to know why your skin gets oily, understand it’s not just your skin, it’s your whole body experiencing an influx of lipids. 

Your brain sends these lipids to mute your body’s ability to uptake glucose because your brain isn’t getting it’s fix, and it simply won’t stand to see less important organs thrive when it can’t.

Why isn’t the brain getting it’s fix? Well, because it’s developed insulin resistance as well, and it needs more glucose to perform normal functions. And add in the fact your brain/hypothalamus is likely inflamed, which means it needs more glucose to handle all the situations that draw on it (aka stress), and you can see that the brain has a serious problem going on.

So the next time you think about the oil pouring down your face, understand it’s your brain that needs something right now. 

(Interesting to note, think about the fact you have sebaceous glands all over your body, but where are the ones that commonly trigger with oily skin? Pretty close to the hypothalamus.) 

It’s a pretty different concept, I know, but I believe this is ground zero for oily skin, and it’s the concept in which all future body based oily skin treatments will eventually stem from. 

Not to say it’s easy to overcome, as there’s a few more parts of our body that come into play that complicate the situation. However, I’ve been hard at work figuring out the best way to unravel this problem. And I’m almost ready to share the solution…

Stay strong oily ones! 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 1/29/2019 at 9:02 AM, MyBody101 said:

 

Hey guys, sorry for the delay, but here’s what I’ve been working on lately. I think you’re gonna find it interesting - 

 

I think before we can get into any remedy for oily skin, we have to figure out what the actual problem is. 

Oily skin is commonly defined as this -

 

“Oily skin is characterized by an increased amount of lipids on the skin surface due to overactive sebaceous glands”.

 

This makes it sound as if the issue is the sebaceous glands being overactive, and if we can figure out how to stop them from being overactive, then we can “defeat” oily skin. 

This also happens to be the basis for almost every skincare product on the market which fights oily skin. Somehow get the sebaceous glands to calm the f down, either through constriction, drying, moisturizing, or even just breaking them. 

 

But what if it’s all wrong? 

 

If you’re on this site reading about oily skin, you know that skincare doesn’t solve your problem, there’s something else going on that no one has been able to figure out. 

To see any progress with oily skin, we have to start over with our understanding of it. For me, that started with this question - 

 

What if oily skin isn’t even a skin issue? 

 

Like... at all. 

 

(think about that for a second)

 

What if the sebaceous glands aren’t overactive at all, but behaving exactly as they should? 

What if the hormones that trigger oily skin, from testosterone and dht on the skin, to insulin and IGF-1 inside the body, are behaving exactly as they should? 

What if everything related to your skin being oily is 100% intentional and necessary? 

In that case, we would really need to know the “why” behind all these actions. What bigger purpose could they serve?
 

Why is there an abundance of oil (or lipids) on my skin for seemingly no reason? 

Why, every time I eat a carb, does my body expel excess fats/lipids/oils onto my skin? 

It’s such a strange mystery. 

But if we look at it in a different light, it may finally start making perfect sense. 

We assume that our skin is the only place that experiences a boost in lipids. 

 

What if that’s not the case? 

 

Inside the body, fat cells seem to get their cues from the same place that the sebaceous glands do, the blood. 

In older adults, there’s even a connection between visceral fat and oily skin, which OilyOneCanobe noted when he said he needed to see his abs to gain ground on his oily skin. 

What likely is happening is there’s an abundance of lipids circulating inside our body, not just on our skin. 


Now, think about this concept on it's own. 

What happens when you add excessive amounts of lipids to any human, or even mouse for that reason, in a lab experiment? 

The answer is insulin resistance. 

Many studies show this to be the case. 

So now the question becomes, what’s the point of your body getting flooded with lipids that seem to create an environment inside your body that encourages insulin resistance? 

Why would your body purposely cause itself to become insulin resistance? 

 

Here’s the kicker…

 

Because when the BODY experiences insulin resistance, the BRAIN can get it’s fix. 

Your brain consumes more glucose than any other organ, and when it comes to glucose, it’s the alpha. Insulin is the key that unlocks the doors for glucose to be used by the cells.

If you want to know why your skin gets oily, understand it’s not just your skin, it’s your whole body experiencing an influx of lipids. 

Your brain sends these lipids to mute your body’s ability to uptake glucose because your brain isn’t getting it’s fix, and it simply won’t stand to see less important organs thrive when it can’t.

Why isn’t the brain getting it’s fix? Well, because it’s developed insulin resistance as well, and it needs more glucose to perform normal functions. And add in the fact your brain/hypothalamus is likely inflamed, which means it needs more glucose to handle all the situations that draw on it (aka stress), and you can see that the brain has a serious problem going on.

So the next time you think about the oil pouring down your face, understand it’s your brain that needs something right now. 

(Interesting to note, think about the fact you have sebaceous glands all over your body, but where are the ones that commonly trigger with oily skin? Pretty close to the hypothalamus.) 

It’s a pretty different concept, I know, but I believe this is ground zero for oily skin, and it’s the concept in which all future body based oily skin treatments will eventually stem from. 

Not to say it’s easy to overcome, as there’s a few more parts of our body that come into play that complicate the situation. However, I’ve been hard at work figuring out the best way to unravel this problem. And I’m almost ready to share the solution…

Stay strong oily ones! 

 

 

This is all really interesting stuff and is far more enticing than the usual advice about oily skin, which has done nothing for me and many others. Along the lines of what you are saying, what are things that can be done to improve oily skin? I know I've tried every treatment under the sun for my oily skin and it hasn't helped one bit. I'm looking forward to hearing more about your findings.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On ‎1‎/‎29‎/‎2019 at 6:02 PM, MyBody101 said:

 

Hey guys, sorry for the delay, but here’s what I’ve been working on lately. I think you’re gonna find it interesting - 

 

I think before we can get into any remedy for oily skin, we have to figure out what the actual problem is. 

Oily skin is commonly defined as this -

 

“Oily skin is characterized by an increased amount of lipids on the skin surface due to overactive sebaceous glands”.

 

This makes it sound as if the issue is the sebaceous glands being overactive, and if we can figure out how to stop them from being overactive, then we can “defeat” oily skin. 

This also happens to be the basis for almost every skincare product on the market which fights oily skin. Somehow get the sebaceous glands to calm the f down, either through constriction, drying, moisturizing, or even just breaking them. 

 

But what if it’s all wrong? 

 

If you’re on this site reading about oily skin, you know that skincare doesn’t solve your problem, there’s something else going on that no one has been able to figure out. 

To see any progress with oily skin, we have to start over with our understanding of it. For me, that started with this question - 

 

What if oily skin isn’t even a skin issue? 

 

Like... at all. 

 

(think about that for a second)

 

What if the sebaceous glands aren’t overactive at all, but behaving exactly as they should? 

What if the hormones that trigger oily skin, from testosterone and dht on the skin, to insulin and IGF-1 inside the body, are behaving exactly as they should? 

What if everything related to your skin being oily is 100% intentional and necessary? 

In that case, we would really need to know the “why” behind all these actions. What bigger purpose could they serve?
 

Why is there an abundance of oil (or lipids) on my skin for seemingly no reason? 

Why, every time I eat a carb, does my body expel excess fats/lipids/oils onto my skin? 

It’s such a strange mystery. 

But if we look at it in a different light, it may finally start making perfect sense. 

We assume that our skin is the only place that experiences a boost in lipids. 

 

What if that’s not the case? 

 

Inside the body, fat cells seem to get their cues from the same place that the sebaceous glands do, the blood. 

In older adults, there’s even a connection between visceral fat and oily skin, which OilyOneCanobe noted when he said he needed to see his abs to gain ground on his oily skin. 

What likely is happening is there’s an abundance of lipids circulating inside our body, not just on our skin. 


Now, think about this concept on it's own. 

What happens when you add excessive amounts of lipids to any human, or even mouse for that reason, in a lab experiment? 

The answer is insulin resistance. 

Many studies show this to be the case. 

So now the question becomes, what’s the point of your body getting flooded with lipids that seem to create an environment inside your body that encourages insulin resistance? 

Why would your body purposely cause itself to become insulin resistance? 

 

Here’s the kicker…

 

Because when the BODY experiences insulin resistance, the BRAIN can get it’s fix. 

Your brain consumes more glucose than any other organ, and when it comes to glucose, it’s the alpha. Insulin is the key that unlocks the doors for glucose to be used by the cells.

If you want to know why your skin gets oily, understand it’s not just your skin, it’s your whole body experiencing an influx of lipids. 

Your brain sends these lipids to mute your body’s ability to uptake glucose because your brain isn’t getting it’s fix, and it simply won’t stand to see less important organs thrive when it can’t.

Why isn’t the brain getting it’s fix? Well, because it’s developed insulin resistance as well, and it needs more glucose to perform normal functions. And add in the fact your brain/hypothalamus is likely inflamed, which means it needs more glucose to handle all the situations that draw on it (aka stress), and you can see that the brain has a serious problem going on.

So the next time you think about the oil pouring down your face, understand it’s your brain that needs something right now. 

(Interesting to note, think about the fact you have sebaceous glands all over your body, but where are the ones that commonly trigger with oily skin? Pretty close to the hypothalamus.) 

It’s a pretty different concept, I know, but I believe this is ground zero for oily skin, and it’s the concept in which all future body based oily skin treatments will eventually stem from. 

Not to say it’s easy to overcome, as there’s a few more parts of our body that come into play that complicate the situation. However, I’ve been hard at work figuring out the best way to unravel this problem. And I’m almost ready to share the solution…

Stay strong oily ones! 

 

 

So if we follow this, ketosis diet might solve the problem right ? Since the brain wont ask for glucose but cétones ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.


  • Personalized Advice Quiz - All of Acne.org in just a few minutes

×