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lovelycrimsonred

Appt. Tmrw To Obtain 2Nd Course Of Isotretinoin. Luck Needed!

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I've updated my signature to contain my acne rx history, to the best of my knowledge. I've been on rx acne medication, both oral antibiotics and topical creams, for 20 years. I am 30 years old. When I was 24, after suffering from the physical and psychological effects of acne throughout middle school, high school, college, and beyond, a dermatologist finally took pity on me and prescribed isotretinoin (Claravis). I responded well to the treatment and had almost no side effects, not even dry skin (expect for slightly dry orifices). By the end of treatment, I was 100% clear.

In 2011, about 10-20% of my acne came back, especially on my back, neck, and scalp. I began seeking a dermatologist with whom I could complete a second round of isotretinoin, not an unusual request for someone who has undergone one treatment cycle. As of 2015, I have seen 4 dermatologists who have been happy to continue taking my money and prescribing me more oral antibiotics and topical medications, but who have refused to oversee a second round of isotretinoin. Despite the fact that there is a potential cure for my condition, these dermatologists would rather see me suffer for another two decades.

Acne is a treatable condition that does not have to ruin adolescence and young adulthood, but it ruined mine and has left me with physical and emotional scarring. On the one hand, I realize that it's vain to complain about non-fatal skin conditions when children are dying of cancer, cities are being bombed, and people are starving or freezing to death on this very planet. On the other hand, knowing that others are worse off has not prevented me from suffering from my own condition. Growing up, I did not go out with friends when invited because I did not feel I could face the world. I did not sleep over friends' houses because I did not want to have to go through my acne regimen at their house, and I did not want to stain their sheets and pillows with BP. All my sheets, towels, and pillows were bleached for more than a decade until I refused to use BP any longer. I did not participate in gym class or sports due to the fear that sweating would worsen my acne. I did not run for student council because I did not want to stand in front of my classmates and make a speech. I did not wear sleeveless, V-neck, or scoop-neck clothing because of my upper-arm, back, and chest acne. I did not go to the beach with my friends because I did not want to wear a bathing suit and reveal my back acne, and my prescriptions suggested limited sun exposure. I did not go on group trips that would require me to stay overnight. I did not go to prom. I did not have my senior photo taken. I did not date until college, at which point I could not readily accept the affection of another because I felt unworthy of being with someone who did not have acne.

After I completed my course of isotretinoin in 2009, I suddenly realized what I was like to live. I could suddenly face the world. For the first time in my life since childhood, I felt happy. I started making positive live changes. I realized how depressed I had been from 1995-2009 due to my acne, something I had not realized until I left that dark period.

I refuse to go back to that dark period in my life. I refuse to let my acne reoccurrence ruin my life. I refuse to allow dermatologists to take my money and prescribe me the same useless treatments over and over. I refuse to accept that no dermatologist will finally allow me to have a potential 100% cure of my condition when there is a medication that may do just that. I will go to my appointment tomorrow armed with as many medical records as I could gather as well as a written, signed letter that specifies that I want to complete a second course of isotretinoin regardless of whether my doctor recommends the treatment, and that I will not take no for an answer.

My only other option is to live with my condition or to purchase isotretinoin illegitimately online, and I refuse to be bullied into those choices by dermatologists who refuse to oversee my treatment, which is a reasonable and called for treatment given my long history of chronic acne, my positive response to isotretinoin in 2009, and my lack of negative side effects.

Wish me luck. Onward and upward.

LovelyCrimsonRed

Edited by lovelycrimsonred

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Hey Lovelycrimsonred, I am right there with you! I know it's late and you already know how things went with the doctor a few days back, but I hope they helped you. I am starting my second course any day now (waiting for my insurance to Pre-Authorize my medication costs). Your story sounded familiar to mine in that once I finished my first course I had flawless skin. I knew what it was like to not bleach all my towels and favorite shirts, I could go all day without worrying which parts of my face peeled off or were an oil slick, the list goes on and on...it was the life I always wanted to have. Once the acne slowly started to come back I immediately demanded a second course. I tried two full months of antibiotics, and two different topicals and nothing really helped. I'm still sitting here with acne on my face, embarrassed.

-Just know you're not alone and hopefully your doctor listened to you :)

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lovelycrimsonred, on 11 Mar 2015 - 21:09, said:

I've updated my signature to contain my acne rx history, to the best of my knowledge. I've been on rx acne medication, both oral antibiotics and topical creams, for 20 years. I am 30 years old. When I was 24, after suffering from the physical and psychological effects of acne throughout middle school, high school, college, and beyond, a dermatologist finally took pity on me and prescribed isotretinoin (Claravis). I responded well to the treatment and had almost no side effects, not even dry skin (expect for slightly dry orifices). By the end of treatment, I was 100% clear.

In 2011, about 10-20% of my acne came back, especially on my back, neck, and scalp. I began seeking a dermatologist with whom I could complete a second round of isotretinoin, not an unusual request for someone who has undergone one treatment cycle. As of 2015, I have seen 4 dermatologists who have been happy to continue taking my money and prescribing me more oral antibiotics and topical medications, but who have refused to oversee a second round of isotretinoin. Despite the fact that there is a potential cure for my condition, these dermatologists would rather see me suffer for another two decades.

Acne is a treatable condition that does not have to ruin adolescence and young adulthood, but it ruined mine and has left me with physical and emotional scarring. On the one hand, I realize that it's vain to complain about non-fatal skin conditions when children are dying of cancer, cities are being bombed, and people are starving or freezing to death on this very planet. On the other hand, knowing that others are worse off has not prevented me from suffering from my own condition. Growing up, I did not go out with friends when invited because I did not feel I could face the world. I did not sleep over friends' houses because I did not want to have to go through my acne regimen at their house, and I did not want to stain their sheets and pillows with BP. All my sheets, towels, and pillows were bleached for more than a decade until I refused to use BP any longer. I did not participate in gym class or sports due to the fear that sweating would worsen my acne. I did not run for student council because I did not want to stand in front of my classmates and make a speech. I did not wear sleeveless, V-neck, or scoop-neck clothing because of my upper-arm, back, and chest acne. I did not go to the beach with my friends because I did not want to wear a bathing suit and reveal my back acne, and my prescriptions suggested limited sun exposure. I did not go on group trips that would require me to stay overnight. I did not go to prom. I did not have my senior photo taken. I did not date until college, at which point I could not readily accept the affection of another because I felt unworthy of being with someone who did not have acne.

After I completed my course of isotretinoin in 2009, I suddenly realized what I was like to live. I could suddenly face the world. For the first time in my life since childhood, I felt happy. I started making positive live changes. I realized how depressed I had been from 1995-2009 due to my acne, something I had not realized until I left that dark period.

I refuse to go back to that dark period in my life. I refuse to let my acne reoccurrence ruin my life. I refuse to allow dermatologists to take my money and prescribe me the same useless treatments over and over. I refuse to accept that no dermatologist will finally allow me to have a potential 100% cure of my condition when there is a medication that may do just that. I will go to my appointment tomorrow armed with as many medical records as I could gather as well as a written, signed letter that specifies that I want to complete a second course of isotretinoin regardless of whether my doctor recommends the treatment, and that I will not take no for an answer.

My only other option is to live with my condition or to purchase isotretinoin illegitimately online, and I refuse to be bullied into those choices by dermatologists who refuse to oversee my treatment, which is a reasonable and called for treatment given my long history of chronic acne, my positive response to isotretinoin in 2009, and my lack of negative side effects.

Wish me luck. Onward and upward.

LovelyCrimsonRed

I wish you all the amazing luck in the world! I am not sure why your doctor (much less four others) wouldn't recommend isotretinoin for you, especially if you've been on it before with such great success - it just makes absolutely no sense! Is your previous dermatologist retired or unavailable? Perhaps - if you can get in touch with that dermatologist somehow, they may be willing to make a recommendation to your current derm on your behalf.

In any case, good luck, good luck, good luck! And don't give up! You are an adult requesting a medication with a PROVEN success rate, and barring any health reasons, you should get that medication! There are side-effects and dangers with taking accutane, as with MANY OTHER COMMONLY PRESCRIBED medications. For a doctor not to prescribe it to a healthy adult who will obviously benefit is just ludicrous.

Opiates, pretty much given out like tick-tacks these days, actually kill thousands of people yearly. Do we have to jump through hoops and blood tests and pregnancy tests to get that medication? Nope. Doctors hand out antibiotics before even taking the time to adequately diagnose your sniffles,contributing the rise of antibiotic resistant diseases. Are there any mandatory waiting periods to get those drugs? Nuh-uh. And here, we have a medication that actually really works for a majority of people without issue, that actually significantly improves people's lives and prevents severe physical and psychological trauma when prescribed appropriately,and a dermatologist can just say "no" because they said so. That just SUCKS. And even if they say yes, we (adults who are more than capable of making our own choices and evaluating the pros and cons) have to get pregnancy tests, blood tests, psychological tests just to have the privilege of paying exorbitant prices for this medication, the dermatology appointments and the tests themselves. It makes me so angry that you, as a 30 year old adult woman, can be prevented from taking this medication because of the obvious ignorance of your medical providers.

Gah. Sorry for the rant, just know you are in good company with your feelings :) Please, keep us posted!

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