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SaraLauren

Getting Isotretinoin Prescribed Privately

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Hi,

I have suffered from acne since I was 13. Whatever there is to try I've tried. I spent so many years slathering creams and peroxides and god knows what on my face, as well as taking antibiotics. When I was 17 I finally went on a course of Roaccutane as my acne had flared up pretty badly. You know when it goes from having lots of spots here and there...to suddenly having your cheeks completely covered in them with no normal skin in between. Roaccutane worked a charm.

Now I'm 23, for the past 5 years I've still had mild aacne, but nothing like how bad it used to be. Over the past few months however its suddenly gotten bad again - and when I say bad its nothing like as severe as when I went on Roaccutane the first time, but still enough that I don't even want to leave the house.

So my question is this, I cannot be doing with the whole waiting months to see a derm on the NHS again. I want to see one privately straight away. Can I afford it - not really, but I would honestly live on plain pasta for the next 6 months just to have clearer skin. If I see a private derm, and I am paying, can I be like look Roaccutane is the only thing that works, get me on it. My fear is that I will spend a ridiculous amount on just the initial consultation for them to be like - no your skin isn't bad enough to go on roaccutane. I'll attatch pictures so you can see post-443575-0-60708600-1420323002.jpgpost-443575-0-39685000-1420323038.jpg

I know it's not severe- but surely it has to be classed as persistent at this point?

Any help would be much appreciated!

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I would suggest just finding the core cause of your acne, instead. It really is the quickest way, but only if you're lucky enough to find it. Plus it's expensive. A naturopath is the easiest way to do this. But if your insurance won't cover one, and you don't want to pay, then try any of these tests: Leaky Gut, Gut Health, Digestive Health, Food Sensitivities, Food intolerances, Food Allergies

The ones in bold are the ones I have, and the ones you should probably try first. It's more likely that you have these two, but honestly your root cause may be none of these. I've cleared my acne by avoiding foods I don't agree with.

My suggestion to you is to look into your past and figure out what might be the cause of your acne. Do some research and get some tests on what you think may be wrong with your body. Acne is a rash, and should be treated as a rash would. Obviousely something is causing it, so that's what people should be looking for.

Good Luck! I know it's hard!

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Thanks for the reply! It just runs in my family though unfortunately :/ I've explored all food related options. My Dad had it bad, my brother and sister have it - I just got unlucky in the acne gene lottery :/

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Acne is genetic/hormonal and changes to diet would have minimal, if any, effect. You are correct in seeing a dermatologist. They will take into account your history when deciding what course to take. RO is prescribed for persistent acne even if it is not severe. They will know what to do and you will get it sorted out. Good luck!

I'm sorry, but to claim that diet plays no role in acne is silly. You are absolutely right that genetics and hormones are the key, but hormones aren't just arbitrary agents, randomly there.

After all, how do you think hormones trigger acne? Changes in hormone levels trigger more sebum production while genetic factors such as being sensitive to these fluctuations in hormone levels and having skin types prone to clogged pores, result in pimples. How are hormone levels affected? DIET. EXERCISE. Stress, having medical conditions like PCOS, the list goes on and on. Insulin, for example, is a hormone. Foods that trigger insulin-resistance in women, such as cow's milk and processed sugar, can be culprits. Consuming foods from hormone-treated animals may also play a role. Not getting enough vitamins and antioxidants. Not getting enough sleep. Those are just a few examples of foods and behaviors that trigger changes in hormone levels. And yes, I was told this by my dermatologist, so I'm not just pulling this off the internet or out of thin air.

You can't change your genetics. So there is value in trying to minimize foods and behaviors that trigger your acne. It might not be the cure-all, but it can be really helpful.

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Acne is genetic/hormonal and changes to diet would have minimal, if any, effect. You are correct in seeing a dermatologist. They will take into account your history when deciding what course to take. RO is prescribed for persistent acne even if it is not severe. They will know what to do and you will get it sorted out. Good luck!

And to take @SiriBai's comment further, Diet can have a severe affect on your body. If you eat complete crap everyday, it can wear and tear on your digestive system. If your digestive system is fucked, your body will call on other recources to help get rid of the toxins that are released in the blood stream. The reaction to the toxins in the blood stream can result hives, acne, etc. Even if the awful food didn't do damage to your digestive system, it can negatively affect other aspects leading to chain reactions that can cause acne, or diabeties, or obesity, whatever.

I probably did a crappy job of explaining it, but a bit of research on gmo's, mercury, fructose, and all that other crap they put in our food should give you some insight.

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I guess I'll reply even though the post above's been edited, I definitely think that attacking acne from a variety of sides is the best approach for most of us. Many people do need prescription and topical products in addition to lifestyle and diet changes. I didn't mean to imply that they don't have their place. I visit a dermatologist and am using a variety of topicals and birth control, so I'd be a hypocrite if I said that. I just want to explain how acne is directly related to hormones and genetically being sensitive to hormone fluctuations, and that those hormones can be regulated through the help of diet and exercise, but perhaps it's not always enough to completely eradicate it.

However, I stand by my own opinion that Isotretinoin is toxic: it was originally intended as a form of chemotherapy and we can't begin to understand the long-term effects.

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I guess I'll reply even though the post above's been edited, I definitely think that attacking acne from a variety of sides is the best approach for most of us. Many people do need prescription and topical products in addition to lifestyle and diet changes. I didn't mean to imply that they don't have their place. I visit a dermatologist and am using a variety of topicals and birth control, so I'd be a hypocrite if I said that. I just want to explain how acne is directly related to hormones and genetically being sensitive to hormone fluctuations, and that those hormones can be regulated through the help of diet and exercise, but perhaps it's not always enough to completely eradicate it.

However, I stand by my own opinion that Isotretinoin is toxic: it was originally intended as a form of chemotherapy and we can't begin to understand the long-term effects.

Hey, no worries :) I actually think we have crossed wires - I do agree with you that attacking acne from a variety of sides is the best go. When I stated that diet doesn't cause acne, that was information I'd received from the various dermatologists I've visited over the years. I don't think my statement was silly - I was more saying that in relation to people who think it's best to only rely on food to fix this issue. However I do agree that some foods can reduce inflammation, and diet and exercise can go hand in hand with another treatment plan (as you've acknowledged). I just agree with the docs that diet alone ain't gonna fix severe acne. Reading your post, I can see that you are knowledgable and would probably agree.

I think Iso is just a personal decision people have to make - and that's not a factual issue, just related to opinion and what's best for the individual.

Anyway, cheers for the input!

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Hey, no worries I actually think we have crossed wires - I do agree with you that attacking acne from a variety of sides is the best go. When I stated that diet doesn't cause acne, that was information I'd received from the various dermatologists I've visited over the years. I don't think my statement was silly - I was more saying that in relation to people who think it's best to only rely on food to fix this issue. However I do agree that some foods can reduce inflammation, and diet and exercise can go hand in hand with another treatment plan (as you've acknowledged). I just agree with the docs that diet alone ain't gonna fix severe acne. Reading your post, I can see that you are knowledgable and would probably agree.

I think Iso is just a personal decision people have to make - and that's not a factual issue, just related to opinion and what's best for the individual.

Anyway, cheers for the input!

I'm glad we agree on most fronts. I know that in the '80s and '90s, dermatologists were saying that diet and acne aren't related but my derm says that general opinion is changing back in some respect, acknowledging that there's a link. The problem is, it's really hard to isolate cause vs. correlation. And some people just are destined to have bad skin. =(

I don't know where my acne comes from, because I don't have a history of it in my family, really. My mom had some sort of rash in her early twenties, treated by a round of antibiotics, but it's nothing like mine. My brother had some acne as a teenager but he's outgrown it. And I had nearly perfect skin (re: the occasional isolated zit) until my twenties. That's why I think it's hormonal & diet related or that I have some underlying medical condition that's causing it (although I'd like to claim I'm in perfect health).

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