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scottmac80

tetracycline & alcohol

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Hi.

The Oxytetracycline directions do not mention alcohol - is it like milk... ok to have a few beers as long as its 2 hours before/ 1 hour after you take the tablets?

thanks.

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Hey. It's always been my understanding that drinking while taking an antibiotic negates the positive effects of the antibiotic. Alcohol basically stops it from working. If you want to swallow a useless pill everyday and not reap the benefits, then drink. If you want the antibiotic to work at its fullest, then don't drink.

(Or, you can just do what I do and only allow yourself to ocassionally drink on weekends and hope for the best)

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I assumed the same about alcohol and tetra, but it mentions nothing about it on my instruction sheet. I would like to know because I am fond of drinking - yet obviously would revise my habits if it was really necessary. Anybody have more info?

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i drink, and im on tetra and im clearing.. try not to drink when its time to take it, dont worry bout it so much.. it works great

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ok, let me get this straight. anti biotics clear spots. and alcohol kills anti-biotics. the logical thing to do would be to bathe your face in beer right...?

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ok, let me get this straight.   anti biotics clear spots.  and alcohol kills anti-biotics.   the logical thing to do would be to bathe your face in beer right...?

You are joking right?

Interactions:  Avoid drinking alcohol or using medications that contain alcohol or eating foods prepared with alcohol while taking this drug, and for three days after you finish the medication.  Alcohol may cause nausea, abdominal cramps, vomiting, headaches and flushing.

Some info on medication and alcohol interaction:

A drug has to travel through the bloodstream to the site in the body where it is to have its desired effect. The drug's effects then diminish over time, as it is processed [metabolised] and eliminated from the body. Alcohol behaves in a similar fashion, travelling through the bloodstream, before being metabolised and eliminated, primarily by the liver.

The extent to which each dose of any drug reaches its site of action may be termed its availability. Alcohol can influence the effectiveness of a drug by altering its availability. A single drink of alcohol or several drinks over some hours may prevent a drug's metabolism by competing with the drug for the same processing sites within the liver. This type of interaction prolongs the drug's availability, and may increase the risk of side effects from the drug. On the other hand, chronic alcohol abuse may cause an increase in the liver's ability to process the drug, thus decreasing availability and reducing its effects. This effect may persist for several weeks after stopping drinking. To complicate matters further, a drug may affect the way in which alcohol is broken down, increasing the risk of becoming intoxicated.

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QUOTE(blackpepper @ Jan 20 2005, 02:20 AM)

ok, let me get this straight. anti biotics clear spots. and alcohol kills anti-biotics. the logical thing to do would be to bathe your face in beer right...?

*

You are joking right?

yes, i was............ 'joking'

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